Questions tagged [difference]

This tag is for questions about the difference in meaning between certain phrases or sentences.

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105
votes
8answers
147k views

Is there any difference between being ill and sick?

I can say I'm ill or I'm sick. But what is the difference between the usage of these terms? I've heard that one can use sick for longer-term and ill for shorter-term, but is that really correct? How ...
96
votes
11answers
7k views

Free as in “free speech”, not as in “free beer”

Free software is a matter of liberty, not price. To understand the concept, you should think of free as in free speech, not as in free beer. — Richard Stallman Translating free to my language (...
91
votes
11answers
312k views

What is the difference between “nope” and “no”?

What is the difference caused by using “nope” instead of ”no”? Is it used because “nope” sounds better and not straight like “no”? In some situations, it feels like nope is better to use than no even ...
77
votes
6answers
338k views

What's the difference between “center” and “centre”?

Which one is correct: examination center or examination centre? What is the difference between center and centre? Is the difference only in spelling? What is the usage difference?
70
votes
6answers
8k views

(In, On or At) GitHub?

What's the difference between say: "The project will be on GitHub", "The project will be in GitHub" and "The project will be at GitHub"?
58
votes
12answers
9k views

Difference between “illegal” and “very illegal”

From my understanding of English, "very" means "more than the usual" or "to a higher extent". I've seen on several places the expression "very illegal", such as here as an example: https://youtu.be/...
49
votes
7answers
699k views

Usage “in spite of” and “despite of”

What are the difference between these two prepositions: "despite of" and "in spite of"? And what is the general usage of this two: choose in different situation, followed by etc.
45
votes
4answers
56k views

What's the difference between “last” and “latest”?

When should I use "last" and "latest"? I found two examples: What was the last book you read? Karen was always up to date on the latest fashions It seems both mean "the most recent". Can we use ...
41
votes
8answers
123k views

The difference between “Older” and “Elder”

What is the difference between "Older" and "Elder" ? And are they interchangeable ?
39
votes
4answers
8k views

What is the difference between IMO and IMHO and IHOP?

I was reading a public forum, and I saw the following abbreviations: IMO IMHO IHOP As far as I see, these are interchangeable somehow, but I don't understand the correct usage of them. Just assuming ...
38
votes
9answers
168k views

“co-worker” vs. “colleague”

What is the difference between "co-worker" and "colleague"? In my company there is an employee whose name is Bob. But Bob and I, we don't know each other. In this case, is Bob my "co-worker" or "...
37
votes
5answers
71k views

What is the difference between “do you like” and “would you like”?

Do you like candy? Would you like some candy? Do you like walking? Would you like to go for a walk? What is the difference? And are they the same or not? Do they any use in different situations?
37
votes
7answers
13k views

Why is 'The Chinese have invented the printer' wrong?

In the textbook by by Raymond Murphy, Intermediate English Grammar, 2nd edition, on page 26: "The Chinese invented printing." Raymond Murphy says that we can't use the present perfect here. ...
37
votes
10answers
764k views

What is the difference between “me neither” and “me either”?

I want to know the difference between "me neither" and "me either", are both correct?
37
votes
4answers
220k views

What is the difference among “Sign up”, “Sign in” and “Log in”?

As I said in the title, I am wondering what is the meaning of the following expressions, and what are the differences between them ? "Sign up" "Sign in" "Log in"
36
votes
4answers
59k views

Is Let us = Let's?

Many times I heard these words interchangeably. I want to know if "Let's" and "Let us" are used for the same meaning. I think (for me): "Let us" is word used for requesting. Like Let us do something ...
36
votes
2answers
146k views

What is the difference between “wait” and “await”?

I'd like to know the difference between the two verbs since they seem to have the same meaning. When should I use await, and when wait?
34
votes
3answers
156k views

Differences between “mandatory” and “compulsory”

What is the difference between mandatory and compulsory? Are they synonyms? Can they be used interchangeably especially with regard to something you must do? Writing the essay is a mandatory task. ...
34
votes
2answers
320k views

Working in / for / at?

Which is the correct way to tell where I'm working? I'm working in XYZ company. I'm working for XYZ company. I'm working at XYZ company. Or is there any difference in the meaning?
33
votes
11answers
18k views

What is the difference between robbing and stealing?

In a song (The Troubles by U2), there is this: Somebody stepped inside your soul Somebody stepped inside your soul Little by little they robbed and stole Till someone else was in control I ...
33
votes
4answers
16k views

What is the difference between can and could in 'Can/could you please explain this to me?'

Can you please explain this to me? Could you please explain this to me? I am unable to figure out which to use which situation. I did google, and some posts say they are both the same, even if ...
30
votes
4answers
37k views

What is the difference between “hug” and “embrace”?

What is the difference between hug and embrace? Hug: Squeeze (someone) tightly in one's arms, typically to express affection. Embrace: Hold (someone) closely in one's arms, esp. as a sign of ...
29
votes
3answers
77k views

“file doesn’t exist” or “file doesn’t exists”

You’ve requested the example.txt file. That file doesn’t exist/exists. Which one should I use? Why?
27
votes
2answers
1k views

Dates and times: “on”, “in”, “at”?

I’m often confused when I speak about times and dates. What is the rule for using on, in, and at in the following sentences? I will do it ___ Tuesday. We married ___ March. He returned ___ the same ...
27
votes
7answers
137k views

Difference between “in time” and “on time”

I have an appointment at 8 and I arrive there at 7:55, is it "on time" or "in time"? What about "the nick of time"?
27
votes
4answers
517k views

Difference between “where are you from” and “where do you come from”

What is the difference between "where are you from" and "where do you come from"? Are they the same? Are they used in the same situations or not? When you see someone for the first time which one ...
25
votes
6answers
20k views

What is the difference between “you are being” and “you are”?

Having a debate on whether "You are being a jerk" and "You are a jerk" have the same meaning in context. Are you calling someone a jerk if you state they are "being" a jerk or is the context that they ...
25
votes
3answers
4k views

What are the differences between “to talk” and “to speak”?

Both verbs "to talk" and "to speak" refer to the same action. Is their meaning exactly the same? When is more appropriate to use one, or the other verb?
25
votes
4answers
19k views

what is the difference between “yet” and “still”?

what is the difference between "yet" and "still"? When we can use "still"? and when we can use "yet"? Are they synonyms or not? "The plan could yet succeed." Can I use "still" in that sentence ...
25
votes
1answer
18k views

What's the difference between words “number”, “count”, “amount” and “quantity”? [closed]

I just can't understand when i should use one of these words and when another. They are too similar, but looks like they are not absolutely the same. So what is the difference between them?
24
votes
5answers
8k views

What's the difference between “vanilla” and “plain” when talking about yogurts?

Merriam Webster explains vanilla (when used as an adjective) as: lacking distinction : plain, ordinary, conventional It's not obvious why vanilla has such a meaning, and why plain is listed as its ...
24
votes
3answers
7k views

What does “Yes, you can. But you may not.” mean?

In a cultural function, some seats were reserved for the distinguished persons. But an ordinary spectator wanted to have one of those reserved seats which were empty. He said to the guard, "Can I sit ...
24
votes
8answers
9k views

Is there any difference between friendly and kind?

A music teacher is portrayed as follows: “She talks to everyone. She always says hello.” Thus, is she friendly or kind? Cambridge Dictionary defines friendly as behaving in a pleasant, ...
24
votes
7answers
26k views

Glass vs Cup - differences in usage

In everyday spoken language when you, as native English speakers, say "glass" and "cup" are they considered as a synonym for you or you have a special meaning for each one of them? As a non native ...
24
votes
5answers
189k views

Which one is correct, “in the USA” or “in USA”?

I want to know, what are the differences between "in the USA" and "in USA"? When to use "the" before a nation's name?
23
votes
5answers
119k views

Difference between “nice to see you” and “nice to meet you”

What is the difference between "nice to see you" and "nice to meet you"? Are they the same or not?
23
votes
5answers
71k views

Difference between “fast food” and “junk food”

What is the difference between "fast food" and "junk food"? Are they the same or not? "Are they used in the same way?"
23
votes
4answers
4k views

Difference between “ignite” and “kindle”

Can't grasp the difference and the use cases of these 2 words. They both seem to mean something close to "set on fire", but what is the exact meaning, and are their use cases the same? Can one ignite ...
22
votes
4answers
3k views

Why is “crime story” more correct than “criminal story”?

Criminal is an adjective and story is a noun. Why is "crime story" used instead of "criminal story"? While both crime and story are nouns. What's this latter combination? Is "criminal story" even ...
22
votes
3answers
7k views

Is there any difference in pronunciation between the words “fiancé (a male)” and “fiancée (a female)”?

I see no difference between transcriptions above-mentioned words, and what words / variants would be better to use in those meanings? fiancé /fɪˈɑːnseɪ/ /fɪˈɒnseɪ/ /fɪˈɒ̃seɪ/ - ODO fiancée /fɪˈɒnseɪ/ ...
21
votes
3answers
37k views

“He likes swimming” or “He likes to swim”?

One can say: He likes swimming or He likes to swim. What is the exact meaning of each of these? What is the difference?
21
votes
4answers
12k views

Are “sort” and “order” interchangeable?

Do both sentences mean the same thing? Please, would you order the papers by number? Please, would you sort the papers by number?
21
votes
10answers
9k views

Wealthy and Rich, what's the difference

Is there any difference between someone being wealthy and someone being rich? For instance, is Bill Gates rich or wealthy? Or maybe he is both. I don't get the subtle difference if any.
21
votes
1answer
25k views

What is the difference between “look”, “see”, and “watch”?

When should I use "look", "see", and "watch"? I'm watching "Star Trek". Have you seen "Star Trek"? Are the examples above correct?
20
votes
7answers
51k views

“I have little money” vs. “I have a little money”

What is the difference between “I have little money” and “I have a little money”? Are they the same?
20
votes
5answers
7k views

'I wish to speak WITH a British accent' or 'I wish to speak IN a British accent' - is there a difference?

I wish to speak with a British accent? What is the impact of using in instead of with in the above sentence?
20
votes
3answers
34k views

'to' versus 'in order to'

Is it always possible to just use 'to' instead of 'in order to'? What is actually the additional information provided by 'in order to'? I understand in order to as meaning that the aforementioned ...
19
votes
4answers
3k views

How often do native speakers use the word “to scathe”? Is it OK if I use it instead of “to injure”?

The word "to scathe" is the synonym of the word "to harm" or "to injure". However, I have never noticed how somebody uses it. Is it OK to occasionally use it instead of &...
19
votes
8answers
6k views

What does “the proverbial middle finger” mean?

I read the following line on a certain book: We've given the proverbial middle finger to the society I know that proverbial means something to do with a proverb. But, how the middle finger has ...

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