Questions tagged [difference]

This tag is for questions about the difference in meaning between certain words, phrases, or sentences.

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2answers
119 views

"I thought she will/would go there tomorrow" Why should we use would in this sentence?

"I heard (that) it will rain tomorrow" In this sentence I know we should use will However "I thought she will/would go there tomorrow" Why should we use would and not will in this ...
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1answer
27 views

Chocolate/chocolates- meaning difference in given scenario

I hate chocolates. I hate chocolate. Do both these sentences mean the same thing? I have a feeling the second sentence means the speaker hates chocolate as a flavor whereas the first one means they ...
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1answer
851 views

"Content", "Satisfied", "Pleased" or "Happy"

I have alredy read the similar thread, but unfortunately it didn't include useful information to me! In my eyes, the nuance between these synonymous words is as below: Between content and satisfied/...
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1answer
60 views

Do "hiding behind"/"when hide behind" convey the same meaning here?

Guitarists find security hiding behind the bulky instrument. Guitarists find security when hide behind the bulky instrument. Are these sentences the same?
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1answer
32 views

"Consider" vs. "look" when asking someone to take a fact into consideration to back up one's point

Is there any difference between consider and look when asking someone to take a fact into consideration to back up one's point? For example: That guy is really rude. Consider how he treated the ...
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1answer
23 views

meaning of 'but' in incomplete sentences

summary 'But' is a conjunction to express a contrast between two ideas. Incomplete sentences allow us to omit information without changing the intended meaning. This makes it difficult to identify the ...
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1answer
43 views

Difference between 'How ... enjoying the job'/'How ... getting on with your job'

Is there a difference in meaning between these two sentences? How are you enjoying the job so far? How are you getting on with your job?
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1answer
838 views

What is the difference between "The task isn't processed" and "The task hasn't been processed"?

A project team there are a few tasks. The team manager asks for the status of one from them. What's the right answer? The task isn't processed/handled. The task hasn't been processed/handled. ...
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0answers
25 views

What's the difference between 'much of' and 'much'?

I read in a book this sentence: You may wonder how much of a risk there is. From my previous experience, 'much of' means 'a great portion of', but in the above sentence, it seems not. I think it means ...
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2answers
4k views

What is the difference between curly braces and curly brackets?

I'm really confused about it, sometimes I read something and it refers to {} as curly braces and sometimes to curly brackets, what is the difference between those two terms? Are they referring to the ...
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1answer
183 views

What is the difference in meaning betweee the structure "not...or," "neither...nor, " and "not...nor/neither"?

Is there any difference in meaning between the following sentences? My tablet isn't good or bad. My tablet is neither good nor bad. My tablet isn't good, nor is it bad. My tablet isn'...
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1answer
77 views

What is the difference between this and that while referring to an idea or situation or thing ,which is not present on the spot?

E.g when two persons are talking together, the most common communication are 1.that's good/nice/true 2.how will you find this man/how do you know this ? IN BOTH THE SENTENCES THE SPEAKER RELATES THE ...
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1answer
40 views

Is there any difference in meaning beteen "hang on" and "hang in" in the sense of continuing despite difficulties?

Is there any difference in meaning between hang on and hang in in the sense of continuing despite difficulties? For example: The patient is in a coma. He's hanging in there. The patient is in a coma. ...
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2answers
42 views

What is the difference between "My sole is tickling" and "My sole is ticklish"?

According to my research, "My sole is tickling" refers to "uncomfortable feeling" or a very little pain like an ant bites you or so, while "My sole is ticklish" refers to ...
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3answers
77 views

Proper use of alike

Are the following two sentences grammatical? He is indifferent alike to praise and blames. He is indifferent to praise and blames alike
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3answers
42 views

"Namely", "I.e." and "That is (to say)"

According to the dictionary definitions, all these three items mean identical to me: a. namely b. i.e. c. that is (to say) They are used when one needs to give more details about something that ...
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1answer
19 views

(Do) you look forward to...?

(Do) You look forward to getting back to work? In speech would there be any difference between adding do or not? If you omit it could it indicate that the speaker is more certain that he does look ...
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1answer
17 views

Difference in meaning between "It is 500 miles" and "it is going to be 500 miles" in context

Would you tell me if there is any difference in meaning between it is 500 miles and it is going to be 500 miles in the context below? The load is going from New York to Ohio. It is 500 miles in total/...
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1answer
33 views

This question relates to "What" and "Whose"

[Basically I want to know the names of all the teachers of X college so that I can choose what teacher would be perfect for me] What teacher lectures are you providing? Or Whose teacher lectures are ...
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1answer
74 views

Drawing/Attracting

Tim completely lost his cool and started yelling at the waitress, drawing/attracting everyone's attention. Two questions: Are both "drawing" and "attracting" okay in a example ...
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0answers
25 views

lockout and lockdown

What's the difference between lockout and lockdown in Covid contexts? Consider this headline: NT records 403 new cases of COVID-19, as it exits lockout, introduces vaccine pass system https://www....
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1answer
23 views

"Be not taller than 72 inches to fit..." or "be no taller than 72 inches to fit..."?

Would you tell me if I need to use not or no in the context below? The box has to be not/no taller than 72 inches to fit into the trailer. If both are possible, is there any difference in meaning?
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1answer
24 views

The temperature will increase "during" or "throughout" the night?

If I want to tell someone that the temperature is going to increase over the period of night, how can I say that? The temperature will increase during the night. or The temperature will increase ...
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1answer
27 views

Is there any difference between "She lives on a far-flung land" and "She lives on a far-off land"?

The Oxford dictionary says far-off adjective /ˈfɑːr ɒf/ /ˈfɑːr ɔːf/ [only before noun] ​a long distance away far-flung adjective /ˌfɑː ˈflʌŋ/ /ˌfɑːr ˈflʌŋ/ [usually before noun] (literary) ​a ...
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2answers
31 views

Are "until" and "before" close to interchangeable in this context?

If you say it happened three hours ago, why haven't you contacted us until/before now. Does the sentence have the same meaning no matter which of "until" and "before" I choose? ...
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2answers
76 views

"The package can be picked up till 5 p.m." or "the package can be picked up by 5 p.m."?

Would you tell me if I have to use till or by in the context below? The package can be picked up till 5 p.m. and then we close. The package can be picked up by 5 p.m. and then we close. Generally ...
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1answer
29 views

What is the difference between "I expect a call in the afternoon" and "I'm expecting a call in the afternoon"? [closed]

Would you tell me what is the difference between I expect a call in the afternoon and I'm expecting a call in the afternoon? Are both perfectly natural? If so, which one is more common?
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2answers
122 views

What is the difference between, "it means," "this means," and "which means"?

What is the difference between these: it means, that means, and which means? For example: They gave her the nickname Katie because it means "pure." I don't know if that means she is ...
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1answer
11 views

Does "any" change to "some" in reported speech?

This sentence appeared in a reported speech exercise assigned to me. "Are there any oranges in the fridge?", she asked her mom. This is the exercise's key — it changed "any" to &...
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1answer
52 views

A man for whom or A man in whose case

Which of the following sounds better in a formal manner? A man for whom one year has not passed(elapsed) since he was graduated from the college. A man in whose case one year has not passed(elapsed) ...
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2answers
54 views

Use of more and as many as in different place

I wrote four sentence with “more” and “as much as” used in different places in sentences. Is there a difference among sentences in meaning ? It really confuses me. There are ten times more bacterial ...
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1answer
58 views

Is there any difference in meaning between "hang out with someone" and "hang around with someone"?

Could you tell if there is any difference in meaning between hang out with someone and hang around with someone? For example: Mike is always hanging out with that guy. Mike is always hanging around ...
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1answer
17 views

in past years / in the past years

In past years Mr. Jones, although a hard master, had been a capable farmer... I'm wondering if in past years can be replaced with in the past years? Do they have the same meaning or not?
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3answers
59 views

Difference between the book took 3 years to write and was 3 years in the making

the book took 3 years to write. the book was 3 years in the making. Are there any differences between the above two sentences? Looking at the dictionary it feels like they convey basically the same ...
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2answers
65 views

Compare 'will' with 'would'

Two persons are in a scene.A said"why didnot you meet me at the station?" B said"I was busy in completing my work.I know you would understand. Then he tell about his work.I don't know why B used would ...
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1answer
99 views

Are there any differences between "environmental problem" and "environment problem"?

An environmental problem is a problem that is related to the environment. I also see that an "environment problem" can convey the same meaning. The former is a combination ADJ+NOUN (environmental + ...
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1answer
2k views

Difference between "related to" and "associated with"

What is the difference between associated with and related to such as: This degree is (related in / associated with) an increase.
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1answer
24 views

Is there any difference between "right" or "correct" for confirmation?

The question revolves around 'right?' at the end added when the speaker is not sure about her/his understanding. I think it is common to use "..., right?" where "..." is the ...
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1answer
707 views

"to the extent that" vs "to the extent where"

Is there any difference between: To the extent where education is concerned, no major issues were reported. To the extent that education is concerned, no major issues were reported. ?
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3answers
287 views

What is the difference between "coalesce" and "merge"?

What is the difference between "coalesce" and "merge"? In my native language, I get a similar translation of these words. For example: I coalesce the code I merge the code
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2answers
31 views

When you’re close vs when you’re close up

And when you're close up, give me the shivers - the song Shivers by Ed Sheeran And when you’re close, give me the shivers - my made up example I’m wondering if there’s any difference between close up ...
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2answers
101 views

Difference in meaning due to the position of adverb

What is the difference between the following two sentences ----- It can be easily changed into a subordinate clause. It can easily be changed into a subordinate clause. Do they both mean ...
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2answers
28 views

Take to the streets vs go to the streets

Angry citizens took to the streets to protest the war. Angry citizens went to the streets to protest the war. Can I replace took with went in sentence 1? Would it make any difference? From what I ...
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1answer
27 views

From what I understood vs understand

From what I understood, … From what I understand, … I always have trouble telling which one to use whenever asking a question, writing an email, etc. Are they interchangeable or are they used in ...
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2answers
347 views

"Go off of something" vs. "go from something"

Would you tell me if there is any difference in meaning between go off of something and go from something in the sense of making a decision based on something? For example: I'm not sure if the ...
0
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1answer
104 views

How to choose among "ride a bus" "take a bus" and "be-verb on a bus"?

I'm an experienced native speaking ESL teacher looking for a concise way to explain how to choose between "ride a bus", "take a bus" and "be-verb on a bus". I know a ...
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1answer
29 views

"I told you how I felt that nothing could come close." or "I told you how I felt that nothing comes close."

I'm confused about this since this is in past tense. which one of the following is correct? 1 I told you how I felt that nothing could come close. or 2 I told you how I felt that nothing comes ...
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1answer
27 views

Pass covid to someone vs pass covid on to someone

He went to the party and passed covid to everybody. He went to the party and passed covid on to everybody. As far as I know, in the case of flu, virus, etc we should use pass on to. However, is there ...
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2answers
76 views

Singular or Plural in this sentence?

I'm writing a story about meeting a very old professor whose work I really like, and was wondering which of the following is correct: "Dying professors are rarely the destination of 10,000-mile ...
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1answer
33 views

Is there a difference between "come" and "come out" in the sense of arriving at a place?

I have noticed that people, particularly Americans, sometimes say come out instead of come in the sense of arriving at a place. For example, in the 23rd episode of the fifth season of Friends Joey, ...

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