Questions tagged [difference]

This tag is for questions about the difference in meaning between certain words, phrases, or sentences.

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-1
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1answer
22 views

which is correct: she has complained ABOUT or AGAINST me to the principal

which is correct: she has complained ABOUT or AGAINST me to the principal
0
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0answers
22 views

What's the difference between "since" and "ever since"? [duplicate]

It's seems to me that both "since" and "ever since" have the same meaning. For example, we can say: We both liked the idea and have been working on it ever since. And also: We ...
3
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1answer
92 views

I have been involved in art/arts/the arts

Let's say I did music, dancing and acting in my life. Can I use these three words interchangeably? I think I probably can. I have been involved in art. I have been involved in arts. I have been ...
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2answers
35 views

when is it (un)necessary to add -ing [closed]

Sometimes I get confused if I should add -ing or not. For example, is 'view history' or 'viewing history' correct? or are both technically correct? In general what part of language does this question ...
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1answer
23 views

to anyone whosoever vs. whomever — without a following verb

Is whosoever interchangeable with whomsoever? Please see the 6 examples below. to anyone whosoever Reliability: If these statements are taken as universal claims , applying to anyone whosoever, they ...
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1answer
23 views

Distance between two objects that should not touch: separation or clearance?

I have two objects (not people) that should not touch each other and so I need to verify that the distance between the first object and the second object is greater than a certain threshold. I can ...
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0answers
25 views

What is the difference between 'ameliorate' and 'alleviate'? [closed]

What is the difference between 'ameliorate' and 'alleviate'? They are both rather formal and mean "to make something bad better" (pain, problem, etc.). So how do I distinguish them?
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1answer
27 views

legally innocent and not guilty

I'd like to know if there's any difference between "legally innocent" and "not guilty." The scientist is legally innocent. The scientist is not guilty.
0
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1answer
32 views

Brand New v. New Brand

Brand New v. New Brand What is the difference between “brand new” and “new brand”? I think “brand new” represents a very new item or product just purchased, while “new brand” indicates a very new ...
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1answer
29 views

Is there a difference between "X itself" and "X proper"?

Today I learned a new usage of "proper" in the form of "X proper" which means, according to Cambridge Online Dictionary, "belonging to the main, most important, or typical ...
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0answers
13 views

'Try' vs. 'Say'

Regular verbs take the default '-ed' suffix to form its simple past tense and past participle form : "try / tried / tried". Conjugation of the verb 'say' is : "say / said / said". ...
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0answers
41 views

I/me (a spy) [What is the grammatical difference?]

From Chapter 19 of Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban by J. K. Rowling: "Innocent, but scared!" squealed Pettigrew. "If Voldemort's supporters were after me, it was because I put ...
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1answer
24 views

Regular weak verb vs Irregular strong verb

We know verbs that end with '-d ', '-ed' & '-t' in their past forms are called weak or regular verbs. And the verbs that form their past tense by changing the inside vowel or in different ...
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1answer
13 views

Differences of "no" "there is no" and "there is not"

When to use them? What is the difference? For example: No problem. There is no problem. There is not problem.
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1answer
41 views

What is the difference between in and on?

There are two sentences :- The children play on the playground. or The children play in the playground. The second looks better and we can say it is correct because they are playing in the ...
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1answer
18 views

"Quirk" vs. "Oddity" [closed]

What is the practical difference between the words "quirk" and "oddity"? I do understand they are very common and propably can be used interchangeably in many contexts, but here ...
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0answers
35 views

The difference between a boundary and boundaries

I am wondering what's the difference between a boundary and boundaries? As I can guess, the boundary is, for example, an edge of some sort of figure: But the boundaries is the all boundaries: ...
5
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4answers
753 views

"to the place I was once separated, I will return"

I'm writing a story and I want to use the line to the place I was once separated, I will return. Now my question is, do I have to use "separated from" or can I simply keep it as "...
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0answers
31 views

"it don't" vs "it doesn't" [duplicate]

Quote from Huey Lewis & The News – Hip to Be Square Lyrics | Genius Lyrics: It's not too hard to figure out, you see it every day And those that were the farthest out have gone the other way You ...
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1answer
31 views

What is the difference between "first thing" and "first things first"?

In Russian "first thing" and "first things first" are translated almost identically, so I can not understand when use one or another. For example you can say "We'll talk about ...
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1answer
33 views

"smooth like butter in daily life" is right? [closed]

I want to express melting naturally or smoothly like butter in everyday life. How do you like it? Can I write "smooth life butter in daily"?
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1answer
20 views

Is there any difference between "see what happens" and "see what's going to happen"?

Could you tell me if there is any difference between see what happens and see what's going to happen? For example: I can't say which boxer and how will win. Let's just wait and see what happens. I ...
2
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3answers
457 views

When do we say "he talked down to her" and "he put her down"?

talk down to somebody ​to speak to somebody as if they were less important or intelligent than you put somebody down (informal) to make somebody look or feel stupid, especially in front of other ...
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0answers
41 views

Is "vernacular" or "jargon" suitable to describe the special words that a particular group of people use in their industry?

I'm listening to a podcast about American truckers' life. The first episode introduces the names that truckers use to call the different trucks. For example: "reefer trucks": refrigerator ...
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0answers
36 views

What's the difference between 'generic' and 'common'?

The two words both have the meaning that something is of the ordinary kind and not special. There are 2 examples (from Collins dictionary) following: ...generic California apartments, the kind that ...
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1answer
24 views

"(Deal / Grapple) with something" VS "(Tackle / address) something"

Deal with something: to take action in order to achieve something or in order to solve a problem. Grapple with something: to try to deal with or understand a difficult problem or subject. Tackle ...
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0answers
14 views

Difference among "Technical development", "technology development" and "technological development"

I think these phrases are correct(correct me if I'm wrong). So, Are any differences among the phrases technical development, technology development and technological development?
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1answer
24 views

Difference between sort of agree and half agree

I would like to know if there is any difference between "I half agree " and "I sort of agree". I have searched Internet and find the meaning of "sort of" meaning " ...
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1answer
24 views

Is it correct to say the wine is have drunk or the wine is half drank [closed]

Is it correct to say, "The wine is have drunk" or "The wine is half drank?"
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2answers
28 views

Past Continuous or Past Perfect Continuous? What is wrong with my logic?

My Exercise: Fill in the gaps by putting the verbs in the correct tenses Harry looked great. He ______ (wear) his new suit. Key: Past Continuous - was wearing My Question I think "Past ...
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0answers
19 views

Which of the two sentences is grammatically correct on sounds natural?

I've been remembering this picture for as long I've been remembering myself. I've been remembering this picture since I've been remembering myself. Which sentence is right? I think they have the same ...
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0answers
14 views

Be staying or to stay what is the difference in meaning

I'm going to be staying. I 'm going to stay. Is there a difference in the meaning? May the first one indicate that it won't be for a long time?
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0answers
18 views

‘Type of protected area’ or ‘protected area type’

I came to this sentence that says: The designation of other types of protected area may limit activities such as oil drilling I was wondering if ‘protected area types’ may work instead of ‘types of ...
1
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1answer
34 views

Is there any difference between "next time" and "next time around"?

Could you tell me if there is any difference between next time and next time around? For example: If you pay for the dinner this time, next time/next time around it's on me.
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4answers
2k views

Difference between "Simultaneously", "Concurrently", and "At the same time"

According to Lexico, the word simultaneously means "At the same time". And the word concurrently means "Existing, happening, or done at the same time". And the word (phrase?) at ...
2
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2answers
157 views

Are "nor" and "or" both grammatically correct in the following sentences?

Since there's no warning nor error thrown, I assume it's valid AHK code? Since there's no warning or error thrown, I assume it's valid AHK code? Which one is grammatically correct or both are ...
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1answer
32 views

difference between 'there is not a' and 'there is not any' constructions in the following sentences

A grammar book I am reading says in some cases 'no' = 'not a' or 'not any', and gives the following two examples: (1) We had to walk home because there was no bus. (= there wasn't a bus) (2) There ...
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1answer
238 views

The usage between "etc." and "and so on"

Are there any difference between” etc.” and “and so on”? What cases I shouldn't use “etc.” or “and so on”?
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1answer
13 views

Are 'everyone' and 'every one' are interchangeable when I use them to refer to people?

When I use 'everyone' or 'every one' to refer to people, are they interchangeable? For example, here are some sentences: As soon as everyone had arrived, we began the meeting. She's very popular. ...
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1answer
30 views

Difference between "I gotta go" and "I have to go" [closed]

Regardless the grammar, don't you use "I gotta go" when you need to leave NOW whereas "I have to go" can include the sometime in the future?
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1answer
24 views

In the last year vs. last year

What's the difference between "in the last year" and "last year" in the following? In the last year, barriers have come tumbling down. Last year, barriers came tumbling down.
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1answer
53 views

This user prefers to keep an air of mystery about "them"? [duplicate]

Apparently, this user prefers to keep an air of mystery about them. Since "this user" is singular and "them" is plural, is using "them" as the pronoun correct here?
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2answers
61 views

"Before God...." versus "In the presence of God..."

I am writing my wedding vow. For brevity I am considering replacing "XX, in the presence of God, our family and our friends I take you to be my wife..." with "XX, before God, our family ...
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2answers
34 views

"Sanitize" Vs "Disinfect"

I was wondering if there is any significant difference between: Sanitizing: to make something completely clean and free from bacteria. and Disinfecting: to clean something using chemicals that kill ...
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1answer
20 views

Can 'on the outside' be replaced by just 'outside'?

I understand that the phrase on the outside is commonly used. However, I wonder if I can leave out on the. Here's a sentence I took from this He may be cheerful on the outside, but that’s not how he ...
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1answer
44 views

Stuart (came-reached-arrived-turned )second in the swimming competition

What is the correct choice , arrive and reach used to talk about a place only , example:stuart arrived in France, turned is used when an age has passed ,example he turned 15 , that all I know
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1answer
24 views

Difference between "by way of illustration" and "as an illustration"

I'd like to know there is any difference in meaning between "by way of illustration" and "as an illustration"? or there are used interchanged? I'd like to use it in the following ...
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0answers
33 views

'thought it was" or "thought it would"

I thought it was cheaper to send it airmail but in fact when the postman told me the price it was very expensive. I thought it would be cheaper to send it airmail but I was wrong it was very ...
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0answers
34 views

Difference between usage of: "Now on" vs "Now"

I am writing a technical paper. I have a statement of the following form that I want to write: "From now on, we will use Theorem 1 instead of Theorem 2." Is the word: "on", ...
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1answer
28 views

Can you tell me the difference between 'all over the world' and 'throughout the world'?

Could you tell me the difference between these phrases: 'all over the world' and 'throughout the world' as well as give me some examples?

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