Questions tagged [direct-objects]

For questions about the direct object, which is the object acted upon by the subject and the verb.

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Roles of objects and subjects

I am trying to understand the roles of subjects (agentive, identified, characterized, affected, etc) and roles of objects (affected, resultant, eventive, recipient). Example 1: Having finished their ...
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'It is a car' What is the subject verb and object here?

I have read english word order is 'Subject Verb Object' Here Car seems to be the subject, is - verb , then what is it? If the sentence order is 'Subject Verb Object' , then It should be subject?
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Is "seep" just intransitive?

I was reading "Tunnels" and I found the next sentence: ...walls were caked with efflorescence and streaked with chalky lime scale where fissures had seeped moisture. I looked the word &...
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Does this sentence sound idiomatic: "I know here." to mean "I know this place."

Imagine you came to a place where you suddenly remembered you had seen before. In this situation; Can I say "I know here"? Or do I have to say "I know this place." In other words, ...
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Is the noun (Nancy) a subject or object in this case?

In the following sentence, I say that (Nancy) is a subject, but the test corrector says it is a direct object. Which one is correct? Here comes Nancy.
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Is additional preposition required for phrasal verbs with double object?

Firstly, sorry for my ignorance. I am studying about phrasal and prepositional verbs in these days. My question is "Is additional preposition required for phrasal verbs with double object?". ...
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The passive voice with prepositional objects

The question concerns changing of the form and place of the direct object and prepositional objects in a sentence after it was reverted to the passive voice. For example let's consider the following ...
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How to analyze this sentence, 'He apologised to me for that.'?

'He apologised to me for that.' I know that 'he' is the subject and 'apologised' the verb but I don't know about the rest.
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2 answers
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intransitive use of "drink"

In the following sentence, the object it is necessary, isn't it? But why? a. The milk was so hot that I couldn't drink [it]. The verb drink has an intransitive use, not necessarily related to ...
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Direct object and indirect object for "excite"

For the following sentence, It is this which has excited so curious an interest in his life and character. "so curious" is an indirect object (people is omitted after "curious"),...
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Is 'yet to arrive' a direct object of 'have'?

They have yet to arrive. In this sentence, the understood meaning is that 'they' are going to arrive, but they haven't arrived yet. However, I'm struggling to break this down grammatically. In the ...
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he said to me, "traitor" change to indirect

he said to me, "traitor" change to indirect would the indirect be : He called me a traitor. or He told me that I have been a traitor.
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john said, "David must go tomorrow." would the indirect form be John said that David must have gone the following day?

john said, "David must go tomorrow." would the indirect form be John declared that David must have gone the following day ? or would it be: john said that David would have to go the ...
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Is 'cry' a catenative complement in this example?

In the provided example (below), is 'cry' considered a catenative complement? He made him cry. 'Him' is the object of 'made,' so 'cry' must be a complement. I know that a verb cannot function as an ...
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Direct objects of "teaching a skill"

If you teach someone to do something, you give them instructions so that they know how to do it. When teach is used with a to-infinitive like this, it must have a direct object. He taught ✳(me) to ...
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What is the real function of objects?

I expect you to be my friend. I expect that you’ll be my friend. I see the only difference is that “you” is an object in sentence 1 and that-clause is an object in sentence 2. In this situation, I ...
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Usage of "paid" and "paid for"

Why is it "paid for" and not "paid" in this sentence: Bobo has repaired and repainted the car, but when the woman goes to take out her wallet, the boy shakes his head and says, “...
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He supplied the terrorist with weapon

He supplied the terrorist with weapon Why not supply here follows norms of direct object, indirect object. He supplied the terrorist a weapon (Just like he gave me a book)
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What happened to the missing object or objects in “for us to define as we see fit”?

Reading through this paragraph, I wonder why the object to see is missing from as we see fit, even though the interpretation remains natural and smooth without it: In 1783, Goethe wrote, “Nature is ...
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Is it grammatically correct to say: "I never lend anyone it"?

Is the use "I never lend anyone it" grammatically correct? I'm asking about it because its flow of reading sounds a bit clumsy to me. Can you give me this book? - This book was signed by my ...
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How should I order the sentence with "noun clause" and "wh clause"?

I hope that all of you have a nice day. When the subject is a bit long, we can use "it" as the representative of the "that-noun clause". What if the object or subject complement is ...
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"So as to make difficult the test" or "So as to make the test difficult"

Can one use (a) instead of (b)? a. We changed the questions so as to make difficult the test. b. We changed the questions so as to make the test difficult. Or can one use (c) instead of (d)? c. We ...
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Direct object or Adverb?

'He told me a story' Me- indirect object(it answers question from 'whom') A story- direct object (it answers question from 'what') 2.'He asked me to go' Here, 'me'- indirect object and also the agent ...
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What are ways to ask a question about a direct object in English?

In the sentence: "They help poor families", how do we make a question which the answer is "poor families"? Back in school they taught us that we should use "do" while ...
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I had a kind of feeling this might happen. (what is object?)

I had a kind of feeling this might happen. a kind feeling [a kind]noun of [feeling this might happen]noun phrase I wonder which object is correct.
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Form of a verb in a direct object of an introductory verb: <Verb> + <Direct Object containing a verb>

What is the form of a verb in an infinitive subordinate which is direct object of a verb: to-infinitive, bare infinitive, conjugated verb, or gerund? For example would we say: I see the company to ...
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Which is correct: Betty and he are friends or Betty and him are friends? Please explain. Thank you

Isn't it him is an object pronoun and not subject pronoun. Why do we need to use Betty and him and not Betty and he? Please explain. Thank you.
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How can we identify the structure of a sentence with the verb "ask" and how can we use it correctly?

I'm studying infinitives and gerunds now, and I found out that the verb "ask" can have a direct object. For example: I asked to go to the park. I asked my parents to go to the park. (I know ...
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What is the direct object in "He gave her a kiss"?

I understand that if you give something to someone, that "something" is the direct object while that "someone" is the indirect object. However, I have a hard time believing "...
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Why is the direct object incorrect in this sentence?

In the following statement, the direct object "them" is incorrect and should be removed. Why? I believe that all the principles that underlie how a radio works are beneficial to use them in ...
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Can I say "they wanted me to fit in this world?" and "they wanted to fit me in this world"? Are they both correct?

I feel like they are both correct in the speaking but also feel like maybe one of them is incorrect grammatically because of the obeject pronoun. Is there a rule to object pronoun before or after ...
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5 answers
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Object of the verb "pay"

Under the entry dedicated to the verb “pay” within Longman Dictionary of Contemporary, it is stated: "Do not use pay followed directly by a noun referring to the thing you are buying. Use pay (...
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Is "I wonder whom you make cry" a correct sentence?

I would like to say "You made someone cry. I wonder whom." in only one sentence. And now this is what I've got: I wonder whom you made cry. To me, though, it sounds pretty odd that there isn't an ...
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"Give him it"/"Give it to him" vs. "Give John it"/"Give it to John"

Subject + indirect object + direct object: "Give him it." Subject + direct object + preposition + indirect object: "Give it to him." Similarly, "Give it to John" is ok. But what's the wrong ...
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Phrasal verbs confusion

I saw the following sentences on the cambridge online site.I made some changes and I want to know if they are applicable ? 1- They are digging up the potatoes. (Original) 2- A detective to dig up ...
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"which I gave to you or which I gave you"

Where are the flowers which I gave to you? or Where are the flowers which I gave you? I can subconsciously choose the latter, but isn't there any grammatical rule that could cover this topic? I ...
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Verb plus adjective in adjective phrase

The would make me feel alive. Is there an elipsis with 'to' infinitive marker that not displayed before feel? Is there an adjective phrase 'feel alive' with adjective head? Is the 'to feel alive' a ...
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Why did not delete the ‘it' in the sentence ' Unless ..., have a professional check it.'

Why did not delete the ‘it' in the sentence ' Unless the owner can present recent certification that the house is free of termites, have a professional check it.' I think this sentence is not right ...
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Can a to infinitive and a gerund both be an object of the verb teach?

To infinitive and gerund can be an object of the verb teach? I wonder if these sentences are grammatically correct or incorrect and reasons. 1) I teach you to speak English. 2) I teach you ...
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4 votes
2 answers
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Why does something "belong to someone" and not "belong someone"?

The confusing language lesson bewildered John. Detective Frey believed the suspect's story. You're trying to befriend someone who doesn't trust you. If the examples above are correct, this one ...
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I'm stuck changing active sentences into passive ones

I was given these two sentences: Photographers photographed Brad Pitt as he left the restaurant. Our teacher has given us lots of homework this week. Those are both written using the ...
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Can I replace "to fish" with "fishing" in the sentence "Teach a man to fish, and you feed him for a lifetime"?

Give a man a fish, and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish, and you feed him for a lifetime. Would you tell me whether I can replace "to fish" with "fishing"? Give a man a fish, and you ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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Omission of object

In the following sentence A, is the word "stop" an intransitive verb or a transitive verb? If it's a transitive verb, should the object word such as that/it be added like in the sentence B? A: ...
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Is it grammatically possible to use prepositions 'of/from' in the following sentence: 'I'm a long way off (of/from) being fluent.'?

I am not sure whether I can use prepositions 'of/from' in this kind of structures and how am I to know how to use them properly? I have looked the phrase up and the only examples they give are when it ...
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3 answers
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"Awakened" as transitive verb

With awakened being a transitive verb requiring a direct object, in the sentence He was awakened by a loud crash. is “he” both the direct object and the subject of the sentence? The sentence was ...
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2 answers
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Which part of speech is this?

"It is obligatory for companies to provide details of their industrial processes." The sentence above has phrase "obligatory for companies" and phrase "to provide details of their industrial ...
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2 votes
1 answer
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The plan that I want to give [to] you. Direct, Indirect object in attributive clause

I don't know the grammar rule I must apply in the following sentences. Do I need to add to? Here is the book that I want to give [to] you. Here is the plan that I want to give [to] you. Here is the ...
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2 votes
1 answer
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Who is the direct object and who is the indirect object

In the following sentence, Who is the direct object and who is the indirect object? I know the woman in the blue dress.
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2 votes
1 answer
991 views

"All I did was do something" is correct?

I saw several the following examples beginning with "All I did was": All I did was see something. All I did was hire her. All I did was tell him the truth. Are these sentences correct? Why a verb ...
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4 votes
2 answers
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"The file I sent (to) you". Using the preposition

to send somebody something to send something to somebody Is it necessary to use the preposition in sentences like these, in which the direct object stands before the verb? Open the file I sent ...
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