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Questions tagged [dummy-pronouns]

A dummy pronoun, also called an expletive pronoun or pleonastic pronoun, is a pronoun used for syntax without adding further meaning. An example is the "it" in "it is raining".

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Can we use "It varies a lot" at the beginning of a new paragraph?

Can we use "It varies a lot" at the very beginning of a sentence or a paragraph in written English? I just had a harsh debate with the part-time lecturer about whether we could use "It ...
J.Moon's user avatar
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"It's an honour to see you": Is it dummy "it"?

"It's an honour to see you." Is it dummy "it" and is "to see you" a real subject? "To see you is an honour." Or does "see you" function as an adverb ...
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1 answer
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What does "it" refer to in this sentence

It would help if you created a timeline for yourself and stuck to it when completing your project. What does it refer to?
doraemon1's user avatar
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1 answer
151 views

What exactly is a dummy-it?

When someone, for example, reads a book or watches a movie, and they say: "It was a good movie" or "It was a good reading" Are these kinds of sentences a dummy-it or just an &...
Sunless's user avatar
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3 votes
4 answers
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When ask about someone's gender, can I say "Is it a man or a woman ?"

This is my son's textbook. Q:"Is it a man or woman" A: "A man" Guoguo: Hi, Mike. Why are you standing there? Mike: Hi, Guoguo. I'm waiting for my dad's friend. Guoguo: Is it a man ...
Qiulang 邱朗's user avatar
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There vs It: 1) <There is> <It is> likely to be heavy snowfall; 2) <There are> <It is> bound to be changes when the new system is introduced

oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com: (1a) There is likely to be heavy snowfall. my variant: (1b) It is likely to be heavy snowfall. What is the difference between (1a) and (1b)? oxfordlearnersdictionaries....
Loviii's user avatar
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-1 votes
2 answers
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Could this structure be correct: "There is the cleanest park I've been to"?

I was asked to say if the sentence "There is the cleanest park I've been to" is correct or no. I said no and it should be "This is the cleanest park I've ever been to". Then I ...
Shahrooz's user avatar
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It will be awesome/interesting/nice, etc. if you can join us. - is "it" a dummy it?

Example 1 It will be awesome/interesting/nice...etc. if you can join us. Example 2 If you can join us, it will be wesome/interesting/nice...etc. Can it be written this way like Example 2? I always ...
vincentlin's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
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"It is a good habit for children to read books everyday." - original: For children to read books everyday is a good habit?

"It is a good habit for children to read books everyday." I'm not quite sure how to analyze this sentence. Is the "it" a dummy pronoun? I think the whole infinitive clause is &...
vincentlin's user avatar
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What is the exact value/role of pronoun "it" in this context?

In "Why Haven’t We Made IT Safer to Breathe in Classrooms", what is the actual role the pronoun "it" plays on this sentence? What does "it" refer to? What do I need "...
harola barros's user avatar
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2 answers
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How many meters is it/are there/is there between?

Which one is correct? 1 How many meters is it between this tree and that car? 2 How many meters is there between this tree and that car? 3 How many meters are there between this tree and that car?
user1425's user avatar
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1 answer
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"It" -- a dummy subject or not?

The following are two example sentences of "versus" in the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary. The first question: Is the "it" a dummy subject in both? The second question: Could ...
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Can you refer to "THIS" as "IT"? For example: Is THIS the library? a) Yes, IT is. b) Yes, THIS is

This is from the British council's speaking content. A student is looking for the library and comes to the place, but he is not sure if he came to the right place. So he asks: Student: Is this the ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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Why does English have to use "it", when "it" refers to nothing and has no meaning?

These are the relevant sentences below. It is raining, It is rainy, sunny, cloudy. It is difficult for me to understand. It is easy for you to say. It is essential that you have some experience. It ...
하하호호's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
41 views

than (it) seems/appears

(1a) These boxes contain more toys than it seems possible. — as far as I know, it's correct (1b) These boxes contain more toys than seems possible. — is it correct? (2a) These boxes contain more toys ...
Loviii's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
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'To dance is fun' Versus 'It is fun to dance'

I am going through an English grammar book written for a particular test that I am targeting. The other day, when I was studying 'Infinitives' from it, I stopped at a sentence. To dance is fun. I knew ...
Ashutosh's user avatar
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3 answers
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It "is/was" crazy that he did not attend school for a whole month. - is or was?

Example 1 It is/was nice that you told me these details. Example 2 It is/was crazy that he did not attend school for a whole month. Example 3 It is/was ridiculous that she did not go on the road ...
vincentlin's user avatar
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2 answers
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Can we use existential 'there' and 'there' simply as an adverb of place together?

Existential 'there' works as a dummy subject. And, 'there' is also an adverb of place. So, in a situation when I need to use them together it is considered correct or needs rewording to sound natural. ...
RADS's user avatar
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1 answer
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"It was Ken's birthday yesterday"/"There was Ken's birthday yesterday"

I was doing exercises from Murphy's textbook and came across the following sentence: It was Ken's birthday yesterday. We had a party. I should have changed 'it' to 'there' where it was necessary, so ...
Denis's user avatar
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2 votes
4 answers
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It awaits you to

In the following sentence, what does the "it" refer to? Is it a dummy subject that refers to the infinitival phrase "to test your golfing abilities at a challenging but extremely fun ...
Apollyon's user avatar
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3 votes
4 answers
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What is the function of "there" in the structure, "There is/are/..."?

In the following sentence, what are the form and function of the word "there"? There were fifteen cats and an eviction notice on Janet's front porch. My answer was this: Form: adverb of ...
Maria Rodriguez's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
32 views

There used to be many, even more than (there) are today

There used to be many, even more than (there) are today. There were many, even more than (there) are today. Is there optional is both sentences?
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“I will study hard before IT is the test” Is it correct to use "it" in such cases?

Is it correct to use "it" in cases like the following: I will study hard before it is the test. I will go shopping before it is the party. I am not sure at all, but I think it'd be best to ...
user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
91 views

What part of sentence does the underlined infinitive work in the sentence?

I can understand the meaning of the red underline part in the picture, however, I can't tell the part of the sentence of those infinitives in the subordinate clause. Is it the actual subject of the ...
Henry Wang's user avatar
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1 answer
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it took a lot of effort

a. It took a lot of effort for the bridge to be constructed. Is that sentence grammatically correct? The intended meaning is that constructing the bridge took a lot of effort. I am used to sentences ...
azz's user avatar
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-1 votes
1 answer
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There will be Jay, Jenny and I/me/myself at dinner

There will be Jay, Jenny and I/me/myself at dinner. Which is the most formal here? EDIT: I just realized there are two more options here using the reflexive pronoun "to add emphasis to the ...
GJC's user avatar
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0 answers
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there is almost nothing / there isn't much left / there aren't many left

Are all answers on the question idiomatic? I saw the second answer in my English training course, but my version was the first answer. I don't understand why "there isn't much left" is used ...
Sergei's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
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Which is the correct answer to "who is…?": "He is…" or "It is…"?

I'd like to know how to begin the answer to the following question. Who is the actor that played an action hero in Speed, a cyber-criminal in The Matrix, a killing machine in John Wick, and who’s now ...
Apollyon's user avatar
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1 answer
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"It's quite full up this year." vs "They are quite full up this year." [duplicate]

How do you choose what pronoun to use "It" or "They" if "They" is also used as a gender-free singular? Is there no any logic? It's quite full up this year. They are ...
Sergei's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
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left it to us, as a basic exercise, to V

I'd like to know if the pronoun "it" can be dropped in the following. What'd be the correct analysis? The teacher left it to us, as a basic exercise, to sort the balls into different colors....
Apollyon's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
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for us to condone such actions

a. It will damage our country's reputation for us to condone such actions. b. For us to condone such actions will damage our country's reputation. ======================= c. It will damage our country'...
azz's user avatar
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7 votes
2 answers
153 views

Is it incorrect to leave out the impersonal "it" in the following sentence?

To me, sentences "I hate that you can swim and I can't" and "I hate it that you can swim and I can't" are both correct, and including an impersonal "it" is only a matter ...
Askeladd's user avatar
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1 answer
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"This", "that" and "it" difference

I know the difference between "that" and "this" that "this" is used to point to something near you, while "that" is used to refer to something far from you, but ...
Antonia A 's user avatar
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What does "it" refer to in "make it into the knockout stage"? [closed]

There is a sentence in a newspaper Revisit the Rugby World Cup - the first hosted in Asia and the first to see Japan make it into the knockout stage -with some of the best images of all the highs ...
Tobi's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
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Have to parse "appreciate it if."

I will appreciate it if you can help me. Someone says "it" is the dummy object, with the if-clause being the real one. I doubt it , because if that is the case, "if" can be replaced with "whether", ...
ForOU's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
6k views

“It” used with plural nouns

Maybe it is an interference from my native tongue, but why is it correct to say “It is the locations that make this tournament special”. Since there is the pronoun “it” for singular, and “they” for ...
Dan93's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
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"You and I" or "you and me"

"You and I" is supposed to be used in the subject of the sentence. If the sentence starts with "It's you and I", does that mean it's supposed to be "you and me" because "It" is the subject and "you ...
clickbait's user avatar
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12 votes
4 answers
3k views

What is the meaning of "it" in "as luck would have it"?

What is the meaning of "it" in the following sentences? Our car broke down on the road, but as luck would have it, there was a garage nearby. I arrived a little late and, as luck would have ...
user22046's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
40 views

Does anyone has a dog in "their" home [duplicate]

I have read this ELL question and this ELU question but I still don't understand how to use this one: Does anyone has a dog in their home? Should I use their or something else?
Bonn's user avatar
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2 answers
66 views

When should a sentence start with the pronoun "it"?

As a spanish speaker, i sometimes have problems with the personal pronoun it. Example: It can be dangerous to drive if you are tired. The question is: How do I know when to start the sentence ...
claudio sepulveda's user avatar
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0 answers
16 views

How do you parse the sentence and what is "it"?

The bulk and weight of coal required in the majority of manufacturing industries is large in comparison with the bulk and weight of other raw materials. This is not always true -- as with the ...
Charlie's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
760 views

It is threads versus they are threads

I don't understand why the author used "It is" rather than They are in the following sentence. It is threads, not processes, that are the units scheduled by the system for execution on the ...
Display Name's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
35 views

Should I use 'isn't there' to show no food that I have been craving for? [closed]

"When the food you are craving for isn't there, the last choice you have is Maggi." Is my grammar correct? Or can you change my sentence so it will be better than mine? Thanks!
Nurul Aina's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
813 views

It is + adjective + doing

It is no use crying. It is expensive running this car. It is a waste of time doing this. Why we have this pattern of sentence construction? I more often meet with some sentences have ...
Young's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
2k views

There + verb , is it grammatical?

There didn't exist computers. Will there happen similar events in the future? Are these sentences grammatical or is my mind making stuff up? I haven't been able to find much on the net.
user7945753's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
485 views

dummy "it" and the the verb "make"

I really want to know about the relation between dummy "it" and the the verb "make". These example sentences are from TOEFL, and I collected all of them which includes dummy "it" after the verb "...
Belle's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
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What does "it" mean in these lines? [duplicate]

Can you please help me understand to which noun do it [pronoun] refers to in the below sentences? He is the murderer. Later it was found he is not. The it in the second sentence: " Later it...", ...
user3769778's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
1k views

What does "it" refer to in, "Strange as it may seem..."?

I have a sentence below and some say it means "the Sahara" but I doubt it as it doesn't make sense if it does. Does anyone have any idea about it? Strange as it may seem, the Sahara was once an ...
Park Mike's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
712 views

what does ''it'' refer to in a sentence?

If I see an article advertised, it is the surest proof I know that the article does what is claimed for it, and that it is good value. What does the word "it" refer to? Is the word "it" a "dummy ...
Aung Thu's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
866 views

why we need dummy subjects and it's usage?

There is a book on the table -- existential clause A book is on the table -- basic version A book is there -- (there= on the table, adverb of place) An existential clause is a clause that refers to ...
nanu1's user avatar
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