Questions tagged [ellipsis]

This tag is for questions about the omission of words that are superfluous and/or can be inferred from context.

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2answers
42 views

“Fed up with” or “Fed up”

Is it correct if I don't write 'with' in this sentence?; I fed up (with) reading this book last year. I forgot to write 'with' in the above sentence. But I want to know if the sentence is still ...
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15 views

if you want to do it

a. You can do the work properly if you want to do it. I think in (a) 'it' would be taken to mean 'the work'. But could 'it' also mean a1. You can do the work properly if you want. in other words You ...
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1answer
30 views

Can I imply “kind” or “type” instead of explicitly writing it?

There are 5 English books and 5 French books. Can I say “there are two books” instead of “there are two types of books”? For example: There are grapes and an apple, and there are two (kinds of) ...
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1answer
25 views

Some people wanted to, but the police failed to reveal they

In Garner's Modern American Usage, Garner provides the following quote from a newspaper article: “There are a number of people who might have wanted to kill Robert [...], but the intervening two ...
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1answer
44 views

'Some' is a mandatory word? [duplicate]

The well-known book English Grammar in Use [for intermediate] p.143 give this exercise choice: I went to the library and borrowed books/some books. The book answer (some books): I went to the ...
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1answer
18 views

Can I omit an object after 'those who + verb?'

Those who speak English respect those who don't speak English. Those who speak English respect those who don't speak. Those who speak English respect those who don't. I believe the first and third ...
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1answer
49 views

The Number Of Uninsured Won’t Fall As Much As Expected

Generous subsidies will be available for sick people and families with children who really need medical care to buy individual coverage, but healthy single people between the ages of twenty-six and ...
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1answer
32 views

Why there is no “is” in “Internal storage running out”? [duplicate]

I had this notification in my phone: "Internal storage running out". Wonder what the grammar rule allows to omit "is" in such sentences? I would like to read more about it. Thanks ...
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1answer
19 views

“Please don't be” after “I'm sorry”

I'd like to know if "please don't be" is properly used in the following: M: The book was quite hard for him. He spent a whole year reading it. W: Oops, I’m sorry ... M: Please don’t be. ...
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0answers
21 views

Is there anything omitted before sufficient? [duplicate]

We should be less concerned with students' 'cognitive impatience', however, than by what may underlie it: the potential inability of large numbers of students to read with a level of critical analysis ...
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22 views

Would like or Would like to have

Q. Hi! What would you like to have? Q. Hi! What would you like to order? A1. I'd like to have an orange juice. A2. I'd like an orange juice. Is there any difference between "would like to ...
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What are some adjectives that are usually used without a subject or verb in response to something, similar to “agreed”?

Consider the following example: A: How about I do the dishes and you make dinner? B: Agreed. Could you give me other examples for adjectives that are usually used in this way?
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35 views

ellipsis: [the people too]

Does "the people too" in the following mean the council hates the people too? Or the people hates the place too? Go to almost any city and you find sink estates where you get the feeling ...
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2answers
36 views

Pronoun ellipses in given context

Give me a movie everyone loves but you just can't stand. Give me a movie everyone loves but you just can't stand watching. Give me a movie everyone loves but you just can't stand it. Is the first ...
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2answers
21 views

Is “one had” missing before “Another swore to destroy it”?

In Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2 (2011), Voldemort orders his team to fire spell on Hogwarts shield dome. Then scene cuts to Harry Potter trying to convince Helena to destroy diadem: ...
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1answer
36 views

Omitting “if” at the middle of a sentence

In my book, it just told me about omitting "if" at the beginning of a sentence. Then what about "if" in the middle of a sentence? Example: I wouldn't do that if I were you. I ...
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1answer
11 views

'Has' or 'have' if one of nouns ommited

In the following sentence should I use 'has' or 'have' (words inside [ ] omitted)? Why? Tension at adhesions and [tension at] junctions reportedly have/has opposing effects.
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6answers
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Why should “rip a man apart like a rag doll” be read “… like [it can rip apart] a rag doll” instead of “… like a rag doll [can rip apart a man]”?

A tiger can't win a mental fight with a man, but it can rip the man apart like a rag doll. Why is the sentence above read as? A tiger can't win a mental fight with a man, but it can rip the man ...
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0answers
36 views

“She told me how lucky I am I get to do this”, does omitting “that” here sound natural?

I was reading this post on Facebook in which the writer says: But when she held her grandchildren to sleep, it gave her an emotional reminder of what it was like. How beautiful it felt. How special ...
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1answer
67 views

Omitting “to be”: “I want left alone.” versus “I want to be left alone.”

I have been reading an internet serial for about a year, that is written by someone I believe to be a native or near-native English speaker (like myself), but I have noticed a recurring pattern of ...
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1answer
20 views

Can we remove “because I was” without changing the meaning?

I fell into a trap, afraid I might screw up. I fell into a trap because I was afraid I might screw up. To me these two can mean the same thing, but I am unsure if this is grammatical or not, or if ...
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2answers
30 views

I won’t be very late tonight, I shouldn’t imagine (so)

I won’t be very late tonight, I shouldn’t imagine (so). Is it grammatically correct to add so here? why?
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1answer
44 views

aware of how/aware how

Even if you're aware how bad things are, you should still try not to lose hope. Even if you're aware of how bad things are, you should still try not to lose hope. The more I become aware how their ...
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1answer
43 views

Shouldn’t “would dare mess with me” be “would dare TO mess with me”? [duplicate]

It is a dialogue from a famous movie "Home alone" it is something like below: The way I'm feeling right now no murderer or mugger would dare mess with me. And now I am wondering, why it is ...
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2answers
575 views

Why is there no “be” in the continuous clause?

I started reading literature in English and often see sentences where ing-verb is without be. I met a sentence: Stark's bodyguard spearheading the thing... Can you tell me why there is no is here? ...
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3answers
132 views

Relative clause and omission in news article

I have two questions regarding relative clauses (which I believe they are). Question 1: From an article in The Guardian The Chinese government has taken the rare step of formally confirming to the UN ...
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1answer
40 views

Should I say “I'm going to see” or “I'm going to”?

In the following situation: --Have you gone to see the doctor? --No, but_______. Should I say "I'm going to see" or "I'm going to"? I feel like the former one makes more sense, ...
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3answers
188 views

Omission of verb in a sentence realizing contrast, while using the verb without and with preposition

Is it correct and appropriate to omit the verb in the second part of the sentence below? The reviewer X questioned the scientific background of my Ph.D. thesis but the reviewer Y about too many ...
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0answers
23 views

What is the object of the verb here?

He put the snacks on the table for us to savor. Is the verb savour used transitively in the above sentence? Is this a case of ellipsis where the object them (snacks) is understood?
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25 views

Omission of prepositions

Is there any general rule dictating the omission of prepositions? I often come across sentences where prepositions are omitted and where I would normally have used them. Just to clarify, here is an ...
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0answers
34 views

A question about the conjunction “while”

Isaac Newton changed the world while in quarantine from the plague. Isaac Newton changed the world while he was in quarantine from the plague. while is clearly a conjunction in the second sentence ...
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1answer
33 views

Merging “does not tell” in the following sentence

I recently asked a question on this site and in that question I used "doesn't tell" twice: I checked a similar question on this site, but that question doesn't tell the difference and doesn'...
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2answers
32 views

How to simplify (to shorten) a long sentence with similar patterns?

Suppose that the performance of a system depends on the efficiency of two sub systems called A and B. And I want to say something along this line: A can compensate the poor performance of B, but B ...
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2answers
69 views

if you really, absolutely must

In the following sentence, "must" has no following verb. This kind of ellipsis seems strange to me, as the omitted verb is expected to be in the sentence. Is this use common, or restricted ...
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0answers
17 views

implied if-clause in conditionl sentences

Suppose you see a mistake while reading something and say: I would have used another word. Which is the implied if-clause? if I were the author or if I had been the author If you see a friend ...
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1answer
31 views

“proved a much lengthier task” or “was proved TO BE a much lengthier task”?

But, though Æthelbert, king of Kent, was duly converted to Christianity and Augustine was soon able to establish the seat of his bishopric at Canterbury, the permanent establishment of Christianity ...
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2answers
18 views

“Body” or “Dead body”? [duplicate]

In a story I'm writing someone is killed. A detective arrives at the crime scene. The detective looked down at the body. The detective looked down at the dead body. Is "body" enough? Will ...
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1answer
78 views

Why can’t we drop “The reason” and just say “Why she is still single is because…”?

I know a relative adverb "why" can be followed by a clause and make the clause a noun phrase. It can play a role as an object or a subject in another sentence. For example) I know the ...
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1answer
22 views

Is the use of “am” in this sentence correct?

Can I use am as written in this sentence below? I am certain that I can make a positive contribution to the Medical Enterprise Center at the Downers Hospital, given my diverse background, and am sure ...
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1answer
36 views

Is this grammatical form correct?

All we know is that we should stay alert and not let our guards down. I want to know if the bold part is grammatically correct. Do I have to say "and do not let our guards down" or "...
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2answers
47 views

When can I remove “yet” from a sentence?

When can I remove "yet" from a sentence? I can say for example: "Has the teacher arrived yet?" OR "Has the teacher arrived?" is there any difference in meaning ...
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1answer
23 views

“There is no something” vs “no something”

Is it correct in English to write: No water No apple No dog when there is no water/apple/dog? Is there any rule when only one form is valid: There is no water vs No water Let's say I create a ...
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0answers
17 views

and other things

a. The new manager paid the price for mishandling the deliveries and other things. b. The new manager paid the price for mishandling the deliveries, and other things. I think both sentences could be ...
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1answer
23 views

I have a problem which correlated with something

I have a problem which correlated with something. I have a problem which is correlated with something. Can we omit 'is' in this case (like in the first sentence)? Or is only the second sentence ...
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1answer
36 views

“He gave me the sharpness to penetrate for truths, but not the braveness to face them.”

He gave me the sharpness to penetrate for truths, but not the braveness to face them. or should it be He gave me the sharpness to penetrate for truths, but didn't give me the braveness to take them.
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1answer
59 views

When we talk and already have a context, can we omit components such as “the”, “of” or “in”? [duplicate]

When we talk and already have a context, can we omit components such as "the", "of" or "in"? In the examples below, I want to talk about the students of Harvard ...
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3answers
89 views

Can I use a dash to avoid repetition of verbs and whole segments?

I have a sentence similar to this one that I am working on: A survey showed that 75% of the respondents used both mobile and desktop applications, 20% used only mobile applications, and 5% used only ...
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1answer
23 views

How does ellipses work in these sentences?

In the book Angel and Demons, Dan Brown says under chapter 3: The camber was dark. Medieval. Stone. To me it looks like a very telegraphic kind of describing a space, which is very different than ...
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1answer
18 views

Is a relative adverb omitted in this sentence?

Between weight and they, is a relative adverb omitted? The sentence structure eludes me. Evolution works to maximize the number of descendants that an animal leaves behind. Where the risk of death ...
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3answers
396 views

“because you told me”, “…told me to” or “…told me so"?

Could you tell me which one of the following sentences is the most correct and natural? I quit smoking because you told me. I quit smoking because you told me to I quit smoking because you told me so....

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