Questions tagged [ellipsis]

This tag is for questions about the omission of words that are superfluous and/or can be inferred from context.

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than (it) seems/appears

(1a) These boxes contain more toys than it seems possible. — as far as I know, it's correct (1b) These boxes contain more toys than seems possible. — is it correct? (2a) These boxes contain more toys ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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"The dose is higher than the doctors thought (was) necessary"

Source: (1a) The dose is higher than is necessary. (1b) The dose is higher than necessary. - without "is" (2a) The dose is higher than the doctors thought was necessary. (2b) The dose is ...
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4 votes
3 answers
555 views

"He is more than a friend is"

(1a) He is taller than his friend. — correct (1b) He is taller than his friend is. — as I know, (1b) is also correct, although less common than (1a) (2a) He is more than a friend. — correct (2b) He is ...
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3 votes
1 answer
373 views

Can I remove the subject, as in "It's helpful as removes pain"?

Can subject in subordinated clause be omitted if it's same as in main clause even if verb isn't be-copular? E.g.: It's helpful as removes pain.
0 votes
1 answer
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“…her wrinkled fingers quick at…“ is there a lost "are" between fingers and quick?

She poured again a measureful and a tilly. Old and secret she had entered from a morning world, maybe a messenger. She praised the goodness of the milk, pouring it out. Crouching by a patient cow at ...
1 vote
0 answers
34 views

Why doesn't this sentence include "who" or "that"? "...present to some people {who} we hope..." [duplicate]

I'm going to present to some people we hope will become investors. I think the sentence should be changed into one below. I'm going to present to some people [who] we hope will become investors. I ...
1 vote
1 answer
41 views

Is the phrase "it shows" incomplete?

The headline from NY Times is: Liz Cheney Is Prepared to Lose Power, and It Shows What does it shows? I read through it and it seemed to me the "it shows" phrase means the fact Liz Cheney ...
2 votes
1 answer
29 views

When can we omit "while" in a sentence? "I run {while} listening to music"

I was given the examples of omitting "while" below: I iron clothes watching t.v. I run listening to music. But was told they are both wrong. But I can't see why? It's clear the two ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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One ... Another .... Neither

Does the following work? One of his friends is from Japan, and another from France. Neither can speak German.
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0 votes
1 answer
128 views

Do you say "I'm afraid yes" instead of "I'm afraid so"?

Can I say "I’m afraid yes" to mean "I'm afraid so"? In these conversations, you are B. Read the information in brackets and then answer with I think so, I hope not etc. (You’re at ...
0 votes
1 answer
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If either the topic or the subject is known from context, though, we can leave "them" out as always. - why "them" is used?

Example 1, If either the topic or the subject is known from context, though, we can leave them out as always. I wonder why "them" is used here. Doesn't "either" mean "one of ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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“Don’t confine yourself”

From what I see in dictionaries, with the word “confine,” generally “to” is used as in “confine somebody/something to something.” I wonder if it is okay to use the word “confine” without “to something....
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0 votes
1 answer
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Ellipsis in phrasal verbs

Can we only omit the verb in omission? For example, is this sentence right? How to get over a breakup or over someone.
0 votes
1 answer
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"Every day if you want us to". What is the meaning of "to"?

"Every day if you want us to". What is the meaning of "to"? Why it can not be just "Every day if you want us". I do not understand sense of adding the word "to"....
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-1 votes
3 answers
60 views

Can "where" be omitted in the following?

Can "where" be omitted in situations like these? The waiter carried the order to the table (where) the group was sitting. "We're going to the place (where) you're going to be trained.&...
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0 votes
1 answer
23 views

Why does this sentence 'I find it difficult to speak English fluently' have no copula? [closed]

Moreover, is 'I find it is difficult to speak English fluently' incorrect or unnatural?
-1 votes
2 answers
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Is there a "with/to" implicit in the verb "failed"?

The New York Times published an article that's titled with the phrase/sentence: "How Republicans Failed the Unvaccinated" I feel like there is a complement missing. And it should be like: ...
0 votes
0 answers
27 views

How to omit word from a sentence and keep the gist? [duplicate]

In this headline from New York Times, F.D.A. Advisory Panel to Discuss Ways of Evolving the U.S. Vaccine Strategy I feel a complement before 'to discuss' is needed, like this: F.D.A. Advisory Panel ...
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1 answer
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Missing adverb in a phrase?

The following sentence comes from the English translation of Andrzej Sapkowski's "The Tower Of The Swallow": The length and breadth of the world, all royal couples had separate bed chambers....
3 votes
3 answers
115 views

Do you think it right vs Do you think it's right

When to use either of these sentences: Do you think it right that Nicole didn't get the job? Do you think it's right to do that? I took the first sentence from my grammar book (Oxford Grammar) and ...
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0 votes
2 answers
82 views

Can 'who was' be omitted from "The woman (who was) arrested"?

The woman who was arrested denies all charges. Can 'who was' be omitted from this sentence?
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0 votes
2 answers
34 views

Which one is correct? When asked to comment / When he being asked to comment / When asking to comment / When he asked comment

I'm doing my grammar homework, but it really kills me. ( ).He refused to given any explanation. A. When asked to comment on the quality of the goods. B. When he being asked to comment. C. When asking ...
4 votes
4 answers
717 views

Is it possible to say "Tom likes cats, and Mary dogs."?

Verbs are sometimes omitted when they are repeated, aren't they? ex) There are two roses on the table; one is red and the other yellow. Is it possible to say "Tom likes cats, and Mary dogs."?...
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0 votes
3 answers
19 views

made it impossible not to have an outburst

a. I had an outburst of anger when I was talking to John. He was extremely rude. He really made it impossible for me not to have an outburst. b. I had an outburst of anger when I was talking to John. ...
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2 votes
2 answers
49 views

He wrote more novels than she (wrote) songs

He wrote 5 novels, and she wrote 4 songs. I think you can say: a. He wrote more novels than she wrote songs. b. He wrote more novels than she did songs. Since the verb is repeated, can you omit it? ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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Isn't there a preposition missing?

“They are exhausted families, sheltering in subway stations and schools: Ukrainians displaced by war face a difficult journey west." Isn’t there a preposition missing between “journey” and “west”...
1 vote
0 answers
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Omission in Comparative clause

everyone. He dances better than sings. I have doubts on the omission of a subject after "than". Can I say it as a shortening of: He dances better than he sings. Thanks if you would help.
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1 vote
1 answer
24 views

"it is that, which isn't this" versus "it is that, not this"

"It is a special thing, not like anything else". Is the above sentence in the form of and does mean: "It is a special thing; [it is] not like anything else. Ellipsis "It is a ...
0 votes
1 answer
19 views

What are complete sentences of elliptic phrases such as "Or being lied about..."?

If you can wait and not be tired by waiting, Or being lied about, don't deal in lies, Or being hated, don't give way to hating, And yet don't look too good, nor talk too wise: Is the following their ...
0 votes
1 answer
36 views

"There was a girl came" Explain the ellipsis here, please

It's from DH Lawrence's sons an lovers. “Did a lady call for me yesterday, mother?” he asked. “I don't know about a lady. There was a girl came.” “And why didn't you tell me?” “Because I forgot, ...
1 vote
0 answers
28 views

"ages" for "who are of the ages"

Some people say "ages" below is short for the relative clause "who are of the ages." If so, I'm wondering whether other relative clauses can be shortened into nouns this way, i.e., ...
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10 votes
3 answers
3k views

Is "Being a heavy stick the dog has held it tightly by the middle" grammatically correct?

These are two quotes from The Hound of the Baskervilles: Being a heavy stick the dog has held it tightly by the middle and the marks of his teeth are very plainly visible. (Ch. 1, Holmes studies Dr. ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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"comparison between a new and a standard method(s)"

I want to express "comparison between a new method and a standard method" in the title of my article. But I don't know which one is correct and why. A. comparison between a new and a ...
0 votes
1 answer
35 views

Is it possible to omit "for people" in a sentence?

I have a question regarding the sentence below. This book is intended to make it easier to be informed. I interpreted this sentence as This book is intended to make it easier for people to be ...
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1 vote
1 answer
42 views

Omitting "Which was"

In the following sentence, I am not sure whether I can omit "which was". Omitting is suggested to me by a famous grammar software. Wouldn't "developed" then (after omitting) refer ...
0 votes
1 answer
64 views

Why is the verb "was" skipped sometimes in the passive voice? [closed]

The man offered to help the flight attendants. Why is "was" being skipped here? Isn't it: The man was offered ?
0 votes
1 answer
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Is the use of 'not' for contrast a case of ellipsis?

The car was red, not blue. I went home, not to the supermarket. In these two examples, which use the word 'not' to create contrast, are we seeing a case of ellipsis? Could we find the original forms ...
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0 votes
0 answers
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Is the 'that- clause' a direct object in this sentence?

She convinced him that he was wrong. In this sentence, would we describe 'that he was wrong' as a direct object and 'him' as an indirect object? I would think that convinced acts upon 'him'; however, ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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do replacing 'trust with'

a. You don't trust your wife with your money but you do your cousin? b. You don't trust your wife with your money but you do your cousin with it? c. You don't trust your wife with your money but you ...
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-2 votes
1 answer
30 views

Does the given sentence become grammatically incorrect when you remove the word "as?" Also, does the meaning change when you remove the same word? [closed]

Check as many articles as you're comfortable checking. Check as many articles you're comfortable checking. Is the second sentence grammartically incorrect? Does it mean the same thing as the first ...
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1 vote
3 answers
43 views

but I don't do it

a. I enjoy drinking soda, but I don't drink it, because it is bad for my health. b. I enjoy drinking soda, but I don't do it, because it is bad for my health. c. I enjoy drinking soda, but I don't, ...
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6 votes
2 answers
1k views

Why didn't the author write "the rules we follow in dealing with sets are derived from them." instead of "sets derive from them"?

I am reading "Topology 2nd Edition" by James R. Munkres. I am not good at English at all, but it's a mathematics book. In this book, there is the following sentence: Although we shall not ...
0 votes
1 answer
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definite article after "and"

The sentence about general facts: Molecules are neutral particles made of two or more atoms bonded together. The proton and the electron are parts of an atom. Can we remove article before electron? ...
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2 votes
1 answer
30 views

There used to be many, even more than (there) are today

There used to be many, even more than (there) are today. There were many, even more than (there) are today. Is there optional is both sentences?
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2 votes
1 answer
525 views

He says he's vegetarian, yet he eats everything put in front of him. What is the use of PUT here?

He says he's vegetarian, yet he eats everything put in front of him. How has put been used here? Could anyone please explain? Is it possible to say that in the following way? He says he's vegetarian,...
4 votes
2 answers
2k views

'a large number' without 'of'

When we use 'a large number of' we use a plural verb after it. A large number of people do this. When we use 'the large number of' we use a singular verb after it. The large number of people does this....
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0 votes
2 answers
72 views

"Fed up with" or "Fed up"

Is it correct if I don't write 'with' in this sentence?; I fed up (with) reading this book last year. I forgot to write 'with' in the above sentence. But I want to know if the sentence is still ...
0 votes
1 answer
33 views

Can I imply “kind” or “type” instead of explicitly writing it?

There are 5 English books and 5 French books. Can I say “there are two books” instead of “there are two types of books”? For example: There are grapes and an apple, and there are two (kinds of) ...
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0 votes
1 answer
42 views

Some people wanted to, but the police failed to reveal they

In Garner's Modern American Usage, Garner provides the following quote from a newspaper article: “There are a number of people who might have wanted to kill Robert [...], but the intervening two ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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'Some' is a mandatory word? [duplicate]

The well-known book English Grammar in Use [for intermediate] p.143 give this exercise choice: I went to the library and borrowed books/some books. The book answer (some books): I went to the ...
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