Questions tagged [ellipsis]

This tag is for questions about the omission of words that are superfluous and/or can be inferred from context.

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3
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2answers
563 views

Why is there no “be” in the continuous clause?

I started reading literature in English and often see sentences where ing-verb is without be. I met a sentence: Stark's bodyguard spearheading the thing... Can you tell me why there is no is here? ...
3
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3answers
120 views

Relative clause and omission in news article

I have two questions regarding relative clauses (which I believe they are). Question 1: From an article in The Guardian The Chinese government has taken the rare step of formally confirming to the UN ...
-1
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0answers
30 views

Can the “I” be dropped in a sentence? [duplicate]

I've seen some people doing this in writing (formal and informal). For example: "Hope you're doing good." instead of "I hope you're doing good." "Would love to see that." ...
0
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1answer
37 views

Should I say “I'm going to see” or “I'm going to”?

In the following situation: --Have you gone to see the doctor? --No, but_______. Should I say "I'm going to see" or "I'm going to"? I feel like the former one makes more sense, ...
4
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3answers
181 views

Omission of verb in a sentence realizing contrast, while using the verb without and with preposition

Is it correct and appropriate to omit the verb in the second part of the sentence below? The reviewer X questioned the scientific background of my Ph.D. thesis but the reviewer Y about too many ...
0
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0answers
23 views

What is the object of the verb here?

He put the snacks on the table for us to savor. Is the verb savour used transitively in the above sentence? Is this a case of ellipsis where the object them (snacks) is understood?
0
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0answers
24 views

Omission of prepositions

Is there any general rule dictating the omission of prepositions? I often come across sentences where prepositions are omitted and where I would normally have used them. Just to clarify, here is an ...
0
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0answers
33 views

A question about the conjunction “while”

Isaac Newton changed the world while in quarantine from the plague. Isaac Newton changed the world while he was in quarantine from the plague. while is clearly a conjunction in the second sentence ...
0
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1answer
32 views

Merging “does not tell” in the following sentence

I recently asked a question on this site and in that question I used "doesn't tell" twice: I checked a similar question on this site, but that question doesn't tell the difference and doesn'...
0
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1answer
25 views

How to simplify (to shorten) a long sentence with similar patterns?

Suppose that the performance of a system depends on the efficiency of two sub systems called A and B. And I want to say something along this line: A can compensate the poor performance of B, but B ...
0
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2answers
69 views

if you really, absolutely must

In the following sentence, "must" has no following verb. This kind of ellipsis seems strange to me, as the omitted verb is expected to be in the sentence. Is this use common, or restricted ...
0
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0answers
15 views

implied if-clause in conditionl sentences

Suppose you see a mistake while reading something and say: I would have used another word. Which is the implied if-clause? if I were the author or if I had been the author If you see a friend ...
1
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1answer
29 views

“proved a much lengthier task” or “was proved TO BE a much lengthier task”?

But, though Æthelbert, king of Kent, was duly converted to Christianity and Augustine was soon able to establish the seat of his bishopric at Canterbury, the permanent establishment of Christianity ...
1
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2answers
17 views

“Body” or “Dead body”? [duplicate]

In a story I'm writing someone is killed. A detective arrives at the crime scene. The detective looked down at the body. The detective looked down at the dead body. Is "body" enough? Will ...
2
votes
1answer
75 views

Why can’t we drop “The reason” and just say “Why she is still single is because…”?

I know a relative adverb "why" can be followed by a clause and make the clause a noun phrase. It can play a role as an object or a subject in another sentence. For example) I know the ...
0
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1answer
22 views

Is the use of “am” in this sentence correct?

Can I use am as written in this sentence below? I am certain that I can make a positive contribution to the Medical Enterprise Center at the Downers Hospital, given my diverse background, and am sure ...
0
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1answer
34 views

Is this grammatical form correct?

All we know is that we should stay alert and not let our guards down. I want to know if the bold part is grammatically correct. Do I have to say "and do not let our guards down" or "...
0
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2answers
41 views

When can I remove “yet” from a sentence?

When can I remove "yet" from a sentence? I can say for example: "Has the teacher arrived yet?" OR "Has the teacher arrived?" is there any difference in meaning ...
0
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1answer
21 views

“There is no something” vs “no something”

Is it correct in English to write: No water No apple No dog when there is no water/apple/dog? Is there any rule when only one form is valid: There is no water vs No water Let's say I create a ...
0
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0answers
17 views

and other things

a. The new manager paid the price for mishandling the deliveries and other things. b. The new manager paid the price for mishandling the deliveries, and other things. I think both sentences could be ...
-1
votes
1answer
23 views

I have a problem which correlated with something

I have a problem which correlated with something. I have a problem which is correlated with something. Can we omit 'is' in this case (like in the first sentence)? Or is only the second sentence ...
1
vote
1answer
35 views

“He gave me the sharpness to penetrate for truths, but not the braveness to face them.”

He gave me the sharpness to penetrate for truths, but not the braveness to face them. or should it be He gave me the sharpness to penetrate for truths, but didn't give me the braveness to take them.
1
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1answer
55 views

When we talk and already have a context, can we omit components such as “the”, “of” or “in”? [duplicate]

When we talk and already have a context, can we omit components such as "the", "of" or "in"? In the examples below, I want to talk about the students of Harvard ...
2
votes
3answers
53 views

Can I use a dash to avoid repetition of verbs and whole segments?

I have a sentence similar to this one that I am working on: A survey showed that 75% of the respondents used both mobile and desktop applications, 20% used only mobile applications, and 5% used only ...
0
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1answer
22 views

How does ellipses work in these sentences?

In the book Angel and Demons, Dan Brown says under chapter 3: The camber was dark. Medieval. Stone. To me it looks like a very telegraphic kind of describing a space, which is very different than ...
0
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1answer
17 views

Is a relative adverb omitted in this sentence?

Between weight and they, is a relative adverb omitted? The sentence structure eludes me. Evolution works to maximize the number of descendants that an animal leaves behind. Where the risk of death ...
0
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3answers
184 views

“because you told me”, “…told me to” or “…told me so"?

Could you tell me which one of the following sentences is the most correct and natural? I quit smoking because you told me. I quit smoking because you told me to I quit smoking because you told me so....
0
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1answer
20 views

Can verbs such as “do” and “will” be omitted when restructuring the sentence?

I don't believe a word that comes out of your mouth. Now, which of the two following sentences are closer to the meaning of the sentence above? Not a word that comes out of your mouth, do I believe. ...
1
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1answer
46 views

Verbs without pronouns

You're going to yell at my son, and you expect me to just stand and watch? You're going to yell at my son and expect me to stand there and watch? In the second sentence there is no pronoun preceding ...
0
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1answer
69 views

Can ellipsis occur after time phrases?

Can ellipsis occur after time phrases? Is ellipsis possible in sentences like: Recently ∅ realized that the event.... (or) Last night ∅ was hanging out with my boyfriend when.... (∅ = omitted ...
1
vote
1answer
19 views

Should I use “with” in the following sentence?

Back in his room, he ambles to the desk and, with the same care he took me out (with), he places me in my dear home. Is "with" necessary in this example? Second question, can I write: "...
16
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3answers
3k views

Does “nor he mine” make sense here?

I have been staring at this sentence for 5 minutes: I looked up, though I could not see his face, nor he mine. "Nor he mine" seems...off to me. Is this grammatically correct?
0
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1answer
20 views

when he was fouled

a. It wasn't only Tom who was furious when he was fouled. I was too. b. Tom wasn't the only one who was furious when he was fouled. I was too. Could those be used if the intended meaning is Tom was ...
0
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1answer
29 views

Titles, Labels, Headings, Notices, Slogans Missing Stuff

Michael Swan in his book http://ielts-house.net/Ebook/Vocabulary/Practical%20English%20usage.pdf (page 1) writes: Titles, labels, headings, notices and slogans usually consist of short phrases, not ...
0
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0answers
32 views

Sports Missing Stuff

Michael Swan in his book http://ielts-house.net/Ebook/Vocabulary/Practical%20English%20usage.pdf (page 1) writes: Commentaries on fast-moving events like football matches also have their own grammar. ...
0
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1answer
72 views

How “Is + verb” possible?

We can use a full infinitive or a gerund as a complement of the 'be'-verb. For example, The first thing I do in the morning is to check my mobile phone. The first thing I do in the morning is ...
-1
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1answer
27 views

Is there any omission or abbreviation in this sentence?

I saw the sentence like 'Attached please find the certificate you requested in PDF format.' Is there any omission or abbreviation I don't know in the sentence 'Attached please find the certificate you ...
0
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1answer
58 views

Is the sentence correct or shortened?

Let's look at the sentence. He doesn't want to see me win. Is it shortened? Is it correct grammatically? I think the sentence should be as follows. He doesn't want to see me to win. or He ...
0
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0answers
34 views

“had looking” vs “was looking”

Quote from The Anubis Gates: "At the far end of the walnut-panelled and carpeted room Darrow, looking no more tired than he had last night, was talking to a tall blond man." Shouldn't this be ".....
9
votes
6answers
240 views

What does “you a stranger” mean?

I was reading a book and I noticed a strange sentence for me. "It was brave of you to help Arthur - and you a stranger". What does "you a stranger" mean? Is it a shortened "you are a stranger"?
0
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1answer
227 views

Can I say “less bigger” or “more weaker” and similar phrases?

Suppose that A is bigger than B B is bigger than C Now, is it fine if I say, Compared to A, B is less bigger than C? If so, in this context, can I remove the first part in the almost formal ...
1
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0answers
31 views

Verb Phrase ellipsis in the subordinate

Larson (1987) shows the following as well-formed: (1) b. ii. I will have lived every place that John has lived. I just wondered if the next example would be better formed. I will have lived every ...
2
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1answer
134 views

Omit the redundant relative pronoun when using a conjunction

Is it weird to omit the redundant relative pronoun when using a conjunction to connect multiple adjective sentences? Let me explain what I am asking. Example 1: who 1(a). He is a hero who men don'...
0
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0answers
11 views

Has “which were” been omitted before “noted” in this text?

Has "which were" been omitted before "noted" in this text? "But there is no other evidence that the Persians of this period were the slaves of any such superstitions as that noted by Ammianus."
2
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1answer
45 views

How to refer to a series of pairs?

To enumerate all the pairs of jeans I have, using commas and without repeating "pair", may I put it like this: I have a pink, a black, a grey, two dark and a blue pairs of jeans. Should I ...
0
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1answer
39 views

Is this case of ellipsis acceptable - “encourage in-migration to and inhibit out-migration from that province”?

Is the following sentence acceptable in formal, academic writing? ... relatively higher UI benefits in a particular province encourage in-migration to and inhibit out-migration from that province. ...
1
vote
1answer
27 views

Should I write “so” or “so that” in the following sentence?

He squeezed his eyes shut so (that) fear wouldn't sabotage his determination again. A native English speaker said I should remove "that." I made a Google search: "so that fear wouldn't" vs "so ...
1
vote
1answer
25 views

“places where something is” vs. “places ∅ something is” vs. “places ∅ something is in”

I've been a few places gang wars were prevalent. I've been a few places gang wars were prevalent in. I've been a few places where gang wars were prevlant. I've seen people use place(s) both ...
1
vote
2answers
208 views

Is it correct to say “an additional time”?

Suppose you want to ask your boss to give you more time. Is it correct and idiomatic to say Would you please give me an additional time? I know that I can say "additional time" without the article....
1
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0answers
17 views

Can you omit the noun after the adjective 'own' that follows the genitive of an NP?

a. The opposition party approves of the policy, but the president's own party doesn't. Can you omit the noun 'party' like this? b. The opposition party approves of the policy, but the president's ...

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