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Questions tagged [ellipsis]

This tag is for questions about the omission of words that are superfluous and/or can be inferred from context. For the omission of only sounds or syllables, consider the "elision" tag instead.

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"There Is" with Ellipsis in Negative Sentences

I came across the sentence: "There is no such thing as a bad memory, don't ever think there is. It's up to us.." I understand the first part uses "there is" existentially, but I'm ...
hwkal's user avatar
  • 650
4 votes
2 answers
184 views

Omit the verb to be after the pronoun "one"

I have the following two sentences: I have two pens, one red and one black. I have two pens, one is red and one is black. I have some questions to ask: Are both sentences above grammatically ...
omachii's user avatar
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2 votes
3 answers
85 views

"Backshift - ​the changing of a tense when reporting what somebody said." — There is no subject for the verb "reporting". Is it omitted?

cambridge.org: (1) We don’t use a question mark when reporting wh-questions. As far as I understand, the dependent clause "reporting wh-questions" doesn't have a subject because the subject ...
Loviii's user avatar
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3 votes
3 answers
55 views

What is the complete sentence of “Shame on you”?

What is the complete sentence of “Shame on you”? “Shame” looks like a noun to me. There is no verb in the sentence. Could native speakers please explain it to me? Thank you.
Delfino's user avatar
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0 answers
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"The jury rendered a verdict of not guilty." — "noun phrase + of + adjective phrase" is an unusual word order to me. How to parse it?

britannica.com: (1) The jury rendered a verdict of not guilty. "Noun phrase + of + noun phrase" is a typical construction. But "noun phrase + of + adjective phrase" is a very ...
Loviii's user avatar
  • 4,956
5 votes
2 answers
1k views

Is it correct to say "What, my family and friends would say, is ...?" instead of "What would my family and friends say is ...?"?

ell.stackexchange.com: (1) What would my family and friends say is the driving force of my life? my variant: (2) What, as my family and friends would say, is the driving force of my life? I think (2) ...
Loviii's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
38 views

"X applies to Y as well as Z." — Can it mean both "X applies to Y as well as X applies to Z" and "X applies to Y as well as Z applies to Y"?

my own sentence: (1) X applies to Y as well as Z. I think (1) is ambiguous and can mean two things: (2) X applies to Y as well as X applies to Z. — If "X applies to" was omitted in (1). (3) ...
Loviii's user avatar
  • 4,956
0 votes
2 answers
25 views

ellipsis: ten to eighty thousand dollars

I have made up the sentences below. (1) This antique vase is worth ten thousand to eighty thousand dollars. (NO ELLIPSIS) (2) This antique vase is worth ten to eighty thousand dollars. (ELLIPSIS used) ...
ansonman's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
52 views

Could you give some examples where the part following "nothing but" is omitted?

M-W says anything but idiom : not at all He looked anything but happy. **Though he said he was happy, he looked anything but.** This problem is anything but new. Is the highlighted example actually ...
Tim's user avatar
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2 votes
3 answers
604 views

"Tom they appointed (as) a manager was …" and "The manager they appointed Tom (as) is …" — Is "as" optional here?

If "as" can be omitted in "verb + object + as + object complement", does "as" remain optional in creating relative clauses? my sentences: (1a) They appointed Tom a ...
Loviii's user avatar
  • 4,956
0 votes
0 answers
65 views

Is it clear where the school and playground are?

According to my grammar book, when using and or but to link clauses, we can make the clauses parallel to each other and omit the repetitive parts. Therefore, in my version, the school must be at the ...
newbie forever's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
26 views

ellipsis "when he was young" vs "when young"

I have made up the sentences below. (1a) Jack was good-looking when he was young. (1b) Jack was good-looking when young. Is (1b) correct? Thanks.
ansonman's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
71 views

Removing "that of" from "A more important subject than that of getting indoors"

This sentence is from "The Return of the Native Book II, Chapter 6" A more important subject than that of getting indoors now engrossed her Can I delete "that of", as in below? ...
Display name's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
73 views

Is find + noun + noun possible?

I don't know whether I can use the construction "find + noun + noun" the way it is used in the following sentence. Do you find "behoove" an archaic word? Is this sentence ...
Kaguyahime's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
52 views

Another use of ellipsis in English (not in previous questions)

Today I have come across an English sentence: "It is broken up into many independent countries warring over many issues". Note that there is no comma there. Since "warring" can be ...
Ng.'s user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
50 views

Will go and brush or Will go and will brush?

What's the difference between these? I will go to the bathroom and brush my teeth I will go to the bathroom and will brush my teeth Perhaps one of these sentences is grammatically incorrect. Which ...
user avatar
4 votes
3 answers
164 views

'Having been released in ...' or 'Released in ...'? Is the Perfect Participle Necessary?

Admittedly, there are a few questions similar to this, but I find that the examples are usually compromised by other errors. In these two examples (below), which use participle clauses as supplements, ...
MJ Ada's user avatar
  • 277
1 vote
2 answers
71 views

"You really don't care which one"

I came across the following in an English teaching video: If someone gives you two options to choose from but you really don't care which one, you can say "Either, either". (pronounced /i:...
Mohammad's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
99 views

Can 'eliminate' be used as intransitive verb?

I know the verb 'eliminate' is used only as a transitive verb. However, I have read some articles which use the verb as an intransitive verb, without any objects. For example, Your dog should find a ...
Mr. Peti's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
27 views

"Ann loves Mary but not Kate."= "Ann loves Mary but Kate does not."?

What is the probability of "Ann loves Mary but not Kate." being interpreted as "Ann loves Mary but Kate does not." ? Does prosody change anything here?
waterlily99's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
66 views

Is the dangling modifier applicable to an infinitive phrase?

Incorrect: To see well, the lights in this room need to be adjusted. niu.edu Correct: To see well, you must adjust the lights in this room. I think the first sentence is a restructuring of : The ...
South Indian ɪŋɡlɪʃɪfaɪd's user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
183 views

as Tom told him not to

Can sentences a, b and c be used instead of sentences a1, b1 and c1? a. He didn't turn off the lights, as Tom told him to. b. He didn't turn off the lights, since Tom told him to. c. He didn't turn ...
azz's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
45 views

Help me to understand the construction "Why + noun / adjective / adverb ?" in which there is not a verb

I came across the sentence "Why + noun phrase?". This construction is not quite clear to me because it doesn't have a verb. britannica.com: (1a) Why the hurry? What is the full version of (...
Loviii's user avatar
  • 4,956
0 votes
2 answers
74 views

He had or He did

This is a question I saw in an English Grammar test. Who had an apartment? a. Tony did. b. Tony had. c. Tony was. d. Tony has. As far as I know when have means own we use do, does, and did to make ...
Englishfreak's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
90 views

need do nothing but

this question concerns a bit of modality and ellipsis in English. In such constructions as "can do nothing but ", "do/does nothing but" we usually use bare infinitives, but what ...
Deeo's user avatar
  • 45
0 votes
1 answer
31 views

In a title, can I omit "are you"? "(Are you) worried about climate change?"

I am a copywriter writing mainly in English, but this is not my native language. I'm using tools like Grammarly to make sure I make as few mistakes as possible and try to google my problems, but this ...
viadiva's user avatar
  • 11
0 votes
1 answer
31 views

"For me" — necessary or not?

He works too slowly(for me)to be much use to me. Can (for me)It be omitted, (I think It can be omitted because "to me" give that information.
Sam's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
25 views

and I read the one on physics

a. He read the boring article on biology and I read the one on physics. Was the article I read necessarily boring? b. He read the boring articles on biology and I read those on physics. Were the ...
azz's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
27 views

What phrase is omitted after "as advanced" in this context?

This is from a news article : As years went by, some researchers began to wonder if radiation was still necessary. Chemotherapy, surgery and medical imaging had improved, and patients were being ...
user avatar
22 votes
2 answers
3k views

Strange omission of "to be": "The ground was hard and the rime thick and crisp on the grass."

I encountered this sentence in Cambridge Dictionary: The ground was hard and the rime thick and crisp on the grass. I can't figure it out why there's no any verb after "the rime". It just ...
George Glebov's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
67 views

How can "Ah! That's such a cop out because now I have to create a conversation." be rephrased? Is it ellipted?

I am not sure I understand what this means: I remember boys at school texting me asking me "How's things?". I just remember thinking, "Ah! That's such a cop out because now I have to ...
tes389's user avatar
  • 95
0 votes
0 answers
211 views

What better than to

(It is so easy to pick up fruits at the market when they are plentiful and so fresh during their seasonal time.) So what better than to turn them into a lovely jam, jelly, or even a marmalade to ...
ForOU's user avatar
  • 1,679
0 votes
1 answer
97 views

Can we omit the subject and object at the same time?

Can we omit the subject and object at the same time? example: Although he is hurt by her, he still loves her. (nothing omitted) Although hurt by her, he still loves her. (subject omitted only) ...
leaningEnglish's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
61 views

how to understand the "to his" in this sentence

In my own research, complaints from women about their husbands most often focused not on tangible inequities such as having given up the chance for a career to accompany a husband to his. Hello, ...
hexiaole's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
20 views

the courtesy of explaining himself [closed]

Can one say a. I am giving him the courtesy of explaining himself. instead of b. I am giving him the courtesy of allowing him to explain himself. ? Many thanks
azz's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
53 views

Should 'do' after 'than' be inverted in this sentence?

That is, Strangers stand further apart than acquaintances do is ungrammatical? I have often encountered inverted clauses after than, as, so in comparatives, so the sentence above seems - at least to ...
Lifeispicnic's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
60 views

Let me (be) free/loose

Proceeding from the internet, I inferred the following thing: (1) Let me free. — idiomatic (2) Let me be free. — idiomatic (3) Let me loose. — idiomatic (4) Let me be loose. — unidiomatic That is, &...
Loviii's user avatar
  • 4,956
0 votes
1 answer
278 views

"One of the reasons why ..." vs "One of the reasons (no why) ..." [duplicate]

Will the words "One of the reasons why I ..." be considered wordy? Should I just write "One of the reasons I ..." or there is no much difference between them ?
Qiulang 邱朗's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
25 views

Omission of second " is". Style or grammar rule?

It's the second time I've seen writers omit the second " is" in a sentence: Because the effort is hard and the result unsparing, it isn’t obvious that writing like Boo’s has a future. Is ...
curious333's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
181 views

"Are there...?" with and without the word "any"

I am wondering about the usage of the word "any" with the construction "Are there...?". Does it makes any difference if I ask Are there any books on the shelf? or Are there ...
Irina's user avatar
  • 21
0 votes
1 answer
64 views

I decided not to ____

A: Did you play tennis last weekend? B: No, I wasn't feeling so well, so I decided not to _____. What CAN'T you say in the blank? a. (nothing) b. do c. do so d. do it e. do that f. play g. play ...
listeneva's user avatar
  • 720
0 votes
2 answers
150 views

It is strange that / Strange that

"Strange that they went outside without umbrellas. It's raining!" Is this sentence grammatical? Do I need to say "It is strange that ..."? In this "It is adjective that" ...
Gqqnbig's user avatar
  • 664
5 votes
3 answers
1k views

"She was seriously ill as (she was) an infant." — Is this a case of ellipsis?

oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com: (1) She was seriously ill as an infant. my variant: (2) She was seriously ill as she was an infant. Is it right to say: (1) comes from (2) by omitting "she was&...
Loviii's user avatar
  • 4,956
0 votes
1 answer
31 views

Which part is indispensable in constructions like "as it is illustrated..."?

This conclusion can be verified by checking all the situations as it is illustrated in the appendix. This conclusion can be verified by checking all the situations as is illustrated in the appendix. ...
Ypbor's user avatar
  • 251
3 votes
2 answers
520 views

"had + Subject + past participle" in conditionals

I always thought that the elliptical conditional clause "Had + Subject + past participle" is used only in counterfactual conditionals, e.g. : Had Joe seen Mary, he would have fallen in love ...
Apollyon's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
21 views

Comparative without following noun

Travelers will have longer to switch over to a REAL ID, avoiding for now what many fliers anticipated would be a major hassle. The original article is this. I understand it as '... have longer time ...
SHIN JaeGuk's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
19 views

at an earlier age than

Could one use a. He'll graduate from college earlier than all of his relatives. b. He'll graduate from college sooner than all of his relatives. c. He'll graduate from college before all of his ...
azz's user avatar
  • 2,981
0 votes
0 answers
32 views

beginning next month, beginning next semester, beginning this year ... etc

Example: Beginning next month, Dining Services will no longer serve hot breakfast foods at university dining halls. Is Beginning next month an example of ellipsis? Does it means some complete ...
Stats Cruncher's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
83 views

ellipsis after "although"

infopop.cc: (1a) Although poor, he is quite happy. — correct (1b) Although he is poor, he is quite happy. — correct My variant: (1c) Although is poor, he is quite happy. — I don't know if it's correct ...
Loviii's user avatar
  • 4,956
3 votes
1 answer
268 views

Verb ellipsis (or not)

Many ethnic groups migrated into Vietnamese territory at different historical periods: some came thousands of years ago, fairly early, and some hundreds of years ago. Regardless of that, once you have ...
Hai Duong's user avatar
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