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Questions tagged [ellipsis]

This tag is for questions about the omission of words that are superfluous and/or can be inferred from context.

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25
votes
3answers
183k views

Help to do something or help do something?

I wrote: I will help you to acquire Russian. A native English speaker corrected me saying that 'to' is unnecessary here. Is it correct to say "I will help you acquire Russian"
7
votes
2answers
6k views

Why is “that”/“which” omitted in this sentence?

In the sentence: All the information you need is in these folders. I would have expected to find: All the information that/which you need is in these folders. Why are those omitted?
8
votes
4answers
1k views

“I've been doing this (for) a week” — When do you leave out the 'for' when talking about duration, and when do you not?

The other day I heard someone say: They've been going out a week; I mean, that's not (a) serious (relationship). I wondered if she was speaking correctly, which is presumable, since she was a ...
3
votes
1answer
7k views

“Looking forward to hearing from you” - May I omit “I am” at the beginning?

At the end of a letter, is it correct to omit "I am" in this sentence? I am looking forward to hearing from you Then it will become: Looking forward to hearing from you
3
votes
1answer
172 views

Some clarifications are needed about the grammar of Elliptical Structure

As far as I know, one application of elliptical structure is the omission from a clause one or more elements which has been repeated in previous clauses. However, I do not know whether there exists ...
5
votes
2answers
1k views

Omitting a repeated verb

What is the rule and meaning of does in the following sentence (I think the appear omitted by it but if I am wrong please correct the title and tag): The Moon illusion is an optical illusion which ...
7
votes
2answers
5k views

Exist vs exists in mathematics

Are there any rules about when to say exist and when to say exists in mathematics? For example, both these sentences appear in a book of mine: There exist αi in I such that xn = Σ αi xi. There ...
5
votes
1answer
382 views

Can relative pronouns be omitted in some regions?

“I guess it was Cal asked Lee.” (Aron, born in California) . . . . . . “That’s a smell could raise me out of a concrete grave.” (Adam, born in Connecticut) (John Steinbeck, East of Eden) In the ‘...
0
votes
1answer
393 views

“who” vs. “whom” and when to omit the relative pronoun

This is the boy who was asked by the teacher to stay back after school. This is the boy whom the teacher asked to stay back after school. This is the boy the teacher asked to stay back after school. ...
8
votes
2answers
283 views

Why is using only one “a” enough in this sentence?

[...] Leonardo da Vinci became renowned for his multiple talents: he was a painter, architect, engineer, mathematician and inventor. In the above sentence, why has only one "a" been used, even for ...
11
votes
2answers
2k views

Is it always necessary to repeat the pronoun before each verb?

Is it always necessary to repeat the pronoun before each verb? For example, do I need always to say: She called me and she said X or can I use a shorter one She called me and said X ?
5
votes
3answers
1k views

Why is a preposition sometimes optional?

This question arises after seeing this thread. Consider the following sentences - There is no point discussing this here (Between "point" and "discussing", there is a "in" and that is ...
5
votes
4answers
568 views

In “Approval was given, and Ju's art displayed.” how can the transitive verb 'display' be used without an object?

I have read a sentence like that from a magazine: "Approval was given, and Ju's art displayed." Since the word display is a transitive verb, how can it be used like this without an object?
4
votes
2answers
7k views

Is “she was younger than he” a grammatically correct expression?

I am reading an e-book named In Cold Blood written by Truman Capote, in which I read a sentence as: ...the person he had wished to marry——the sister of a college classmate, a...girl named Bonnie ...
3
votes
1answer
138 views

“Anyone have an extra apartment there?”

Anyone have an extra apartment there? This quote is from an English native speaker. Why "anyone have"? This could be an elliptical question, but I'd expect native speakers to ask a question using an ...
1
vote
2answers
239 views

How to use THAT and WHO [duplicate]

I have some doubts about the usages of That and Who. Sometimes I read sentences such as. "You are someone I love" "You are someone WHO I love" Or "People were asked to describe the qualities they look ...
3
votes
1answer
160 views

Can 'bit of' be used?

As Harry helped himself to a treacle tart, the talk turned to their families. "I'm half-and-half," said Seamus. "Me dad's a Muggle. Mom didn't tell him she was a witch 'til after they were ...
11
votes
2answers
1k views

Delete the phrase “I'm” from the sentence by native speaker [duplicate]

I hear many native speakers say, for example, "glad to connect" or "Not sure about that". Where they delete "I am" at the beginning of the sentence, Is that kind of "short the talk", I mean to speak a ...
6
votes
4answers
2k views

What is “No parking” short for?

I am studying in the imperative sentence and I wonder what "No parking" is short for.I also want to get more comprehensive material of the imperative sentence.
2
votes
1answer
183 views

Why is “the” sometimes optional?

In my Grammar book I have... She's been watching television. Can we also say... She's been watching the television I just want to know if they are the same.
2
votes
1answer
2k views

Adj + (of) a + noun construction

I'd like someone to explain me this contruction. How often and how is it used? For example: It is not that big (of) a deal. and He is not that good (of) a husband. Are these examples ...
1
vote
1answer
120 views

Toy Line (Production) Run

I am not sure about the meaning of this: link Transformers: Generation 1 (also known as Generation One or G1) was a children's toy line that ran from 1984 to 1991 and was produced by Hasbro. ...
1
vote
1answer
56 views

This is the gift that my dad sent (to) me

This is the gift that my dad sent me on my birthday. Vs This is the gift that my dad sent to me on my birthday. Is to required? Also Presenting you guys, the trailer of the film. Vs ...
16
votes
5answers
212k views

“Hope this help” or “Hope this helps”?

Good evening all, I often see people write "hope this helps" at the end of a communication, especially when they are trying to answer other people's queries about computer problems. Recently, my ...
4
votes
1answer
4k views

Can I omit “the” in this sentence?

Dan has already given you a sense of the dramatic change that occurred between the '20s and the '30s. Can I omit the second highlighted the in this sentence? I know there is a thing called ellipsis, ...
10
votes
4answers
1k views

Is “You alright?” (without “are”) acceptable?

I'm having a hard time figuring out which is the correct form of asking this kind of question. I mean speaking strictly, this doesn't sound right: You alright? or You eaten anything? compared to Are ...
2
votes
1answer
83 views

When are words like “that” and “the” unnecessary?

There are several cases where "the" and "that" are completely unnecessary for the understanding of a sentence. So, I want to know when they are unnecessary and why. For instance, in “She told me that ...
10
votes
3answers
2k views

Why isn’t the pronoun “it” placed after But?

THE SOURCE: NY times Poland sent soldiers to fight alongside Americans in Iraq, but is nonetheless one of the few countries still hosting North Korean workers over Washington's objections. Why ...
7
votes
3answers
327 views

'if', meaning 'even if'. Why would ommision occur in some cases?

From Michael Swan's Practical English Usage 261.10: If, meaning 'even if' We can use 'if' to mean 'even if'. I'll finish this job if it takes all night. I wouldn't marry you if ...
6
votes
1answer
1k views

May I drop “is” in constructions like “as is shown by the example of…”?

May I drop "is" in constructions like "as is shown by the example of..."? On the one hand, such reduced variants can be met even in Wikipedia. But on the other hand, I don't quite understand its ...
4
votes
1answer
463 views

Can even an expert use Conversational Deletion in his official place?

And when you’re drinking processed fruit juice, you’re also missing out on the healthy benefits of eating real fruit itself such as the fiber and vitamins. So you better off going back to eating ...
3
votes
2answers
260 views

When to add “in” before “this way” or "adj +way:

It's my own example:"I was just born this way" "you should carry out this ceremony in more simple way" "he scolded me (in) the worst way"
3
votes
2answers
35 views

Why doesn't the clause “…and reputation its shadow” need a verb?

The clause "reputation its shadow" in "Character is like a tree and reputation its shadow" has no verb, but is still correct. Please kindly tell me the grammar point used here!
3
votes
2answers
253 views

Can I omit the second “is” in “is… and is…”?

What is the correct syntax: This column is a primary key and null. or This column is a primary key and is null. Should I write is again?
2
votes
1answer
289 views

Can the preposition “in” be omitted , in sentence, “you expect to rule the city the way you rule other city.”

I have a question in below sentence. You expect to rule the city the way you rule other city. I think the correct sentence is You expect to rule the city in the way you rule other city. why ...
2
votes
2answers
169 views

Repeating the verb in a comparison

Which of the following sentences are correct? Mainlanders were actually more likely to be arrested than native Indians Mainlanders were actually more likely to be arrested than native Indians ...
2
votes
2answers
5k views

“{Pay / Pay for} the expenses”

I have a question about the usage of "pay" and "pay for": He paid the expense. He paid for the expenses. Could both be the same? This dictionary seems to say "pay" and "pay for" are ...
1
vote
1answer
654 views

usage of “both--and”

She is a singer. She is an actress. If I transform this sentence into "both--and" structure, which one is better to use, the sentence #1 or #2? She is both a singer and actress. She is ...
1
vote
4answers
407 views

Ellipses and how to decide which part I can omit as an ellipsis

In English languages Ellipses are very common and widely used. Few are easy to pick up but few others are really hard to get. for non native speakers it's really very hard to pick up a difficult ...
1
vote
2answers
283 views

What's the grammar of “You kiss me tomorrow, I'll bite you face off!”?

"Zootopia" around 00:23:37/01:48:32 There is a YouTube clip (by the way, is "clip" an appropriate word?): Nick Wilde: Hey, no kiss bye-bye for daddy? Finnick: You kiss me tomorrow, I'll bite ...
1
vote
1answer
171 views

If Ida Been Here, Ida Been There

I am curious to know what this sentence mean. One thing I may get right, I think, Ida is short for "I'd have". If Ida Been Here, Ida Been There Album by Craobh Rua, native of Belfast, or so I ...
1
vote
1answer
262 views

Ellipsis with apostrophe?

This is a strophe from one song: "But the times were hard, Lord, the jobs were few all through Tecumseh valley but she asked around and a job she found tending bar at Gypsy Sally's" ...
0
votes
2answers
122 views

Omitting “who is” in “I would like to date a girl [who is] at least of my intellect”

Instead of I would like to date a girl who is at least of my intellect. can I say I would like to date a girl at least of my intellect. by dropping the phrase "who is"? What I try to mean ...
0
votes
2answers
34 views

Is the ellipse made in the mentioned sentence idiomatic?

Lisa is entitled not to be deceived on X as much as is entitled not to be deceive on Y. Lisa is entitled not to be deceived on X as much as she is entitled not to be deceive on Y. In the ...