Questions tagged [ellipsis]

This tag is for questions about the omission of words that are superfluous and/or can be inferred from context.

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2
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2answers
759 views

Is the word "people" omitted in this passage?

“A basis is thus provided for explaining the unique indifference of this literature to certain cultural aims implicit in the aesthetic rendering of experience—to ideas generally, to theories of value, ...
2
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1answer
10k views

arrange a meeting [for] this weekend

What would you say if we arranged a meeting this weekend? Does it say that the meeting will take place this weekend or that we will be just arranging it this weekend (deciding its time)? My ...
5
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4answers
2k views

What is "No parking" short for?

I am studying in the imperative sentence and I wonder what "No parking" is short for.I also want to get more comprehensive material of the imperative sentence.
1
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1answer
2k views

Combining Sentences with Participle Phrase and Conjunction

While we were walking through the park. We saw lovely flowers. 1) While walking through the park, we saw lovely flowers. 2) Walking through the park, we saw lovely flowers. Are those reduced ...
1
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1answer
168 views

How to join sentences that have a preposition

This is the chair. My parents gave it to me. This is the chair which my parents gave to me. This is the chair which my parents gave me. Should it have "to" or not?
6
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2answers
14k views

When is it correct to repeat the subject?

In a sentence like this: He read a book and he discussed it with his friends. Is it correct to leave the second "he"? (He read a book and discussed it with his friends.) I suppose it is, because I'...
3
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2answers
845 views

Elliptic sentences with two auxiliaries (e.g. "I would (have).")

I can contract my sentence when I contradict a statement or reply to a question. A: I would not trust him. B: I would. ( I would trust him.) But in the following sentence, must it always be “...
5
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1answer
7k views

Can I omit "the" in this sentence?

Dan has already given you a sense of the dramatic change that occurred between the '20s and the '30s. Can I omit the second highlighted the in this sentence? I know there is a thing called ellipsis, ...
3
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2answers
8k views

Is "she was younger than he" a grammatically correct expression?

I am reading an e-book named In Cold Blood written by Truman Capote, in which I read a sentence as: ...the person he had wished to marry——the sister of a college classmate, a...girl named Bonnie ...
1
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2answers
121 views

What does this sentence imply?

I found this tweet but I don't know what it implies... Does it mean the show will regret that it spent more time wallowing in sad feelings about what it had done and should have spent more time ...
0
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2answers
10k views

Where do you study?

What is the correct reply to Where do you study? At the library. The library.
7
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2answers
30k views

"if you want to" vs "if you want" - in the end of a sentence

I saw this sentence: But you can use this also, if you want to! I'm just wondering, what is the difference from this: But you can use this also, if you want! When and why should I attach to?
2
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1answer
456 views

Usage of "look" followed by a noun

I came across a sentence like "The room looked a big mess." (Macmillan Dictionary) "That looks an interesting book." My understanding is that "look" of this usage comes with adjective and "look like" ...
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2answers
72 views

Should I add "counterparts" to the end of this paragraph?

I am writing an introduction: Humanities courses are very useful to students. Yet, in my opinion, schools should focus more on science and mathematics courses. The benefits of these courses vastly ...
2
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1answer
735 views

Should I say "they" twice in this sentence?

I have this sentence: Even though some people argue that public transportation systems have many disadvantages, I firmly believe that they have many benefits and should be constructed. Should I ...
26
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3answers
3k views

Why there are two 'were's in one sentence?

But, as time went on, it became increasingly obvious that many of the programs were not available, and the ones that were were written in a particularly obscure form of BASIC. (Probability Theory: The ...
3
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2answers
276 views

Can I omit the second “is” in “is… and is…”?

What is the correct syntax: This column is a primary key and null. or This column is a primary key and is null. Should I write is again?
2
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2answers
14k views

Which vs Which one

Recently I've come across sentences that doesn't have "one" in it and it looks like odd to me because I'm used to say "which one...?" The sentences must be correct because they are from a grammar. ...
3
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4answers
4k views

What does 'the + adjective' mean?

From being one of the most popular and admired people at the school, Harry was suddenly the most hated. (Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone) I’ve thought a ‘the + adjective’ means a group of ...
0
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1answer
116 views

Which is the subject?

I heard the high thin laugh again. "You're nobody, son. You don't exist - can't you see that? The white folk tell everybody what to think - except men like me. I tell them; that's my life, telling ...
5
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1answer
441 views

Can relative pronouns be omitted in some regions?

“I guess it was Cal asked Lee.” (Aron, born in California) . . . . . . “That’s a smell could raise me out of a concrete grave.” (Adam, born in Connecticut) (John Steinbeck, East of Eden) In the ‘...
3
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1answer
9k views

"Looking forward to hearing from you" - May I omit "I am" at the beginning?

At the end of a letter, is it correct to omit "I am" in this sentence? I am looking forward to hearing from you Then it will become: Looking forward to hearing from you
10
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1answer
576 views

Why is the subject omitted?

The class everyone had really been looking forward to was Defense Against the Dark Arts, but Quirrell's lessons turned out to be a bit of a joke. His classroom smelled strongly of garlic, which ...
4
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1answer
485 views

Can even an expert use Conversational Deletion in his official place?

And when you’re drinking processed fruit juice, you’re also missing out on the healthy benefits of eating real fruit itself such as the fiber and vitamins. So you better off going back to eating ...
3
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1answer
165 views

Can 'bit of' be used?

As Harry helped himself to a treacle tart, the talk turned to their families. "I'm half-and-half," said Seamus. "Me dad's a Muggle. Mom didn't tell him she was a witch 'til after they were ...
2
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1answer
99 views

Why is there no determiner before wife?

Ken was one of nine children of Patrick William Jubb and wife Mary Alice (nee Finlayson). (The Age) There’s no determiner like ‘his’ in front of ‘wife.’ Did the paper miss it or is it a possible ...
1
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1answer
260 views

Why are there two nouns after neither?

It will be marked that I substitute time terms for spatial ones. In fact, I would have the reader see “nine” and “fourteen” as the boundaries – the mirror beaches and rosy rocks – of an enchanted ...
1
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2answers
42 views

Does this noun phrase denote the result of the verb?

“I think I’ll be a clown when I get grown,” said Dill. Jem and I stopped in our tracks. ‘Yes sir, a clown,” he said. “There ain’t one thing in this world I can do about folks except laugh, so ...
2
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1answer
2k views

Can "is" be omitted in "is to be held on 14th April"?

While reading an article online I found a sentence: Combined Graduate Level Examination, 2013 is to be held on 14th April 2013 has been postponed and now will be held on 28th April 2013 (Sunday)...
7
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2answers
6k views

Why is "that"/"which" omitted in this sentence?

In the sentence: All the information you need is in these folders. I would have expected to find: All the information that/which you need is in these folders. Why are those omitted?
4
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2answers
225 views

Is this 'nor' a short form of 'nor knowing'?

A breeze ruffled the neat hedges of Privet Drive, which lay silent and tidy under the inky sky, the very last place you would expect astonishing things to happen. Harry Potter rolled over inside his ...
4
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1answer
258 views

Can we use adverb phrase with conjunction plus noun phrase?

I could not remember him; but I knew that he was my own uncle—my mother’s brother—that he had taken me when a parentless infant to his house; and that in his last moments he had required a promise ...
34
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4answers
9k views

When is it acceptable to omit the subject "I"?

Have noticed that English speakers omit "I" when they are emailing or chatting: How are you doing? Am fine. Also, this occurs often in daily/weekly reports. Have seen quite a few of them, ...
4
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1answer
1k views

Is 'also' necessary in "not only... but also..." structures?

The car not only is economical but also feels good to drive. I identified with Rowan Atkinson not only as an actor but also as a person. Yes, both sentences, as they stand, are perfectly acceptable ...
11
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2answers
3k views

Is it always necessary to repeat the pronoun before each verb?

Is it always necessary to repeat the pronoun before each verb? For example, do I need always to say: She called me and she said X or can I use a shorter one She called me and said X ?
9
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4answers
2k views

Is "You alright?" (without "are") acceptable?

I'm having a hard time figuring out which is the correct form of asking this kind of question. I mean speaking strictly, this doesn't sound right: You alright? or You eaten anything? compared to Are ...

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