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Questions tagged [ellipsis]

This tag is for questions about the omission of words that are superfluous and/or can be inferred from context.

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2answers
82 views

He is fierce, as were warriors (so)

Is the so in this example incorrect or superfluous? I was thinking about the example of so with do: He asked me to send him money; I did (so). I wondered whether so could be used similarly in my ...
0
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2answers
43 views

Can I take an absence of 'we' as a using of ellipsis in that context?

1) We hear a song from our past and are transported back to a memory from long ago, albeit a good or a bad one the same as 2) We hear a song from our past and we are transported back to a memory ...
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2answers
3k views

former or formerly on name change

I have a difference of opinion with some colleagues of mine. We want to express a changed name of a person with refering to the previous name. I wrote it like this: Steve Smith (formerly Steve ...
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1answer
70 views

with it, outside control

"If the press were not profit-making, who would support it? The only alternative is subsidy and, with it, outside control." Q1. I understand the sentence until "subsidy and", but not the following ...
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3answers
360 views

Can this sentence be like this?

I saw the sentence like this on the internet. I went to the kitchen, cooked for me. Can I understand the meaning of this sentence like this? I went to the kitchen and I cooked for me. Have I ...
0
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2answers
163 views

in spite of everyone playing or in spite of playing

1.In spite of everyone playing well, we lost the game. 2.In spite of playing well, we lost the game. Which is better? I prefer 2#. I think "everyone" and "we" are the same in this sentence.
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2answers
57 views

Omitting the subject between

I can do this one but am not sure about the other. Can I say the sentence above? Or I have to say "...this one but I am not...", but using two I's seems a bit redundant, on the other hand omitting it ...
38
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7answers
10k views

“as rich as him”, “as rich as he” or “as rich as he is”

1) I've never met a man as rich as him. 2) I've never met a man as rich as he. 3) I've never met a man as rich as he is. Which one of the above-mentioned is correct (in formal scenario) and ...
1
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1answer
28 views

Can you leave out “for” in “ask somebody their age”?

Is the form "ask somebody their age" (as opposed to "ask somebody for their age") correct?
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1answer
70 views

Is it appropriate to reduce the sentence in this way?

Can I say this sentence in this way: The document which is to be signed by me is to be reviewed by the Manager and to be signed by the General Director. ⇒ The document to be signed by me to be ...
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2answers
44 views

What is the ellipsis of the sentence?

But then as Mama and Papa drove away, Sal burst into tears. A delayed reaction. It was as if something inside her suddenly broke or popped or was switched on. She was hysterical. Gabby, Billy, and ...
3
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1answer
310 views

Not using the “verb” in a sentence

How correct is to ignore using the verb if it is repeated. example: A traditional teacher can teach hundreds, another one who uses technology thousands.
3
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1answer
70 views

Is “he” omitted in this sentence?

Knowledge of Geology.— Practical, but limited. Tells at a glance different soils from each other. After walks has shown me splashes upon his trousers, and told me by their colour and consistence in ...
4
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1answer
121 views

'Help improve Android Studio' <— Is this grammatically correct? [duplicate]

I have doubt about this sentence. Help improve Android Studio I think it should be "Help to improve", because "improve" is a verb. Is this grammatical correct? If so, why is it correct? If not ...
1
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1answer
56 views

Is a verb missing from “…the company had turned away from DJs and towards the audiophile market…”?

From the article Technics’ new “standard” SL-1200GR turntable expected to cost $2,000 on factmag.com: Earlier this week, Technics’ creative director Hiro Morishita told The New York Times why the ...
4
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2answers
4k views

“First time in” or “first time to”?

In the following sentence: "Is this your first _______________ to Sydney?" I thought that the possible answers were "visit", "trip" or "journey".(any others?) However, I've just seen on the ...
1
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4answers
281 views

should we use “that” or any other conjunction after “if”?

Nick is happy to be home. But I don't know if he's happy I'm with him. I feel narrator should have used "that" or "because" after happy in above sentence. Am I correct?
2
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2answers
114 views

The case when n=1, or the case n=1

In a mathematical proof (using the induction), when I deal with the base case, which is (if any) correct? The case when n=1 is trivial The case n=1 is trivial I would like to know if I need "when" ...
1
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2answers
103 views

Ellipsis for a list of nouns

Let's say a company has several business segments, including Hardware and Software. When I try to combine both these segments in a sentence, should it be "the Hardware and Software segment are ..." or ...
4
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1answer
44 views

Does it make sense to say: “I am trying to”?

Last week, my friends and I went fishing. I heard two people talking beside us while fishing. I don't know them and will name them A and B. This is what they said. A: How long have you been ...
3
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1answer
180 views

Using Indefinite Article

Is it not necessary to use the indefinite article an before e-mail in the following sentence? " ... Six months later you find a name and e-mail address on a card or an old piece of paper." It's ...
1
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2answers
853 views

“Just look” vs “Just look at”

Just look how many poor people are there. or Just look at how many poor people are there. Which is correct or what's the difference?
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2answers
61 views

Can I omit the repeated 'of which'?

given the following sentence I have a snake of which the head is white and (of which) the tail is black. In this expression, can I omit the second (of which)? Or shouldn't I omit it?
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1answer
56 views

Which one is the ellipsis of the sentence?

So, I thought that by taking an unrealistically utopian approach, I could keep the business from growing too much. Instead of trying to make it big, I was going to make it small. It was the ...
0
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1answer
8k views

“No hurries. No worries” - could we say “No hurries nor worries”?

I was recently commenting some answers in Stack Overflow when one person said something to which I replied: No hurries. No worries. I have seen both "no hurries" and "no worries" many times, but I ...
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2answers
32 views

“we have to decide what point will be the next” is it correct or not?

Are the following sentences correct? I have some confusion with them because of the mismatched tenses. I am just confused a little bit about the uses of different tenses in the same sentence. We ...
0
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1answer
110 views

The grammar of some sentences

Are there sentences correct grammatically please? (I don't think so!) They think that the way things are need to be changed. Why do you think it strange? I think they should be: They think that the ...
2
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1answer
1k views

“…which I did.”, “…but I'm not.” - are they correct?

I've been wondering, are structures like the ones mentioned in the title considered correct? Is it perfectly fine to use them, or do they sound overly colloquial? Let's focus on the three examples: ...
2
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1answer
13k views

“Both of these” or “Both these”?

Are the two constructions above correct or one of them is incorrect? Which one then? Both of these images resemble an ocean. Both these images resemble an ocean.
1
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1answer
78 views

where the suffix indicates the address is part of… — is this grammatically correct?

Source: The ABCs of IP Addressing by Gilbert Held (2002) Example: The information to the right of the pair of forward slashes represents what is referred to as the fully qualified domain name (...
1
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1answer
40 views

Is the second “like” indispensable in the sentence “I not only like their language, but like their culture as well”?

I not only like their language, but like their culture as well. Is it right to say "I not only like their language, but their culture as well"? Can I omit the "like" after "but"?
0
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1answer
30 views

Do I need to include “for you” here, or is it implied?

By default, few game profiles are already installed to quickly get up and running. Is this correct use? Or should I say "for you to quickly get up and running"?
1
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1answer
840 views

Being read to me and being read to

Here is a sentence: I enjoy when someone read to me. I think the passive form of this sentence could be: I enjoy being read to me. I found the following sentence where "me" is ...
5
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1answer
324 views

Gerund phrase after the preposition “in”

In this page, http://www.ucblueash.edu/now/2016/03/07/let-us-hear-you-student-survey/, the first sentence says: Students – We need your help in letting us know why you attend UCBA, how you rate ...
1
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1answer
168 views

Is a short answer like “They all do” acceptable?

Can I respond to a sentence like "This kid wants to become a pro basketball player." with "They all do" (want to become a pro basketball player) with the meaning that it's something a lot of kids ...
0
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0answers
94 views

A better way to say “encompass beyond” to go beyond the frontier of technology

I am trying to rewrite the following sentence that I wrote Meet the newest pattern-recognition technology, with predefined sets assorted to encompass outliers. in this way : Meet the newest ...
2
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1answer
85 views

as to why she was

She was relieved to find no one there [in a church], because she hadn't formulated a coherent story as to why she was. From: Still Alice Words in bold are odd to me. What does as to mean here? Why ...
5
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2answers
60k views

'Have just finished' vs. 'Just finished': What is the difference?

I have just finished my homework. I just finished my homework. I think there must be a difference in meaning. Could anyone tell me the difference in meaning sentence 1 and sentence 2?
0
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0answers
117 views

Use of “me and girlfriend”

As a musical experience, Eddie Howlloway Live at the Silver Lounge was a jolt. Two songs, originals, were vehicles for Eddie to describe, simply and sincerely, his enormous lovemaking abilities. ...
0
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1answer
69 views

Ellipsis or not -is

Are these usages of "not" ellipsis or something else? Source Banner Ads Are A Joke In The Real World, But( They are )Not In Class-Action Land. Brad Pitt loves Marion Cotillard, ( he does ) not ( ...
1
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1answer
66 views

Can we use reduced relative forms in formal context?

I know that I can omit the italic part below in daily speech or casual writing. Is it against formality to omit such things in, for example, an article or essay? Research (that is) led by the ...
1
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1answer
654 views

usage of “both--and”

She is a singer. She is an actress. If I transform this sentence into "both--and" structure, which one is better to use, the sentence #1 or #2? She is both a singer and actress. She is ...
1
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2answers
195 views

and so is used — how to properly understand that type of grammar?

Example: "Gzip" compresses to smaller files than the "compress" command and so is used for almost all compressed files on Unix and Unix-like systems. I have a problem with the adverb "so" there. I'...
0
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3answers
2k views

which one: “'Id prefer to drink tea rather than drink coffee”/ “I'd prefer to drink tea rather than coffee” / “I'd prefer to drink tea to coffee”?

Based on the instruction in this website, I can come up with some following sentences: I would prefer to drink tea rather than to drink coffee. I'd prefer to drink tea rather than drink coffee. I'd ...
1
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1answer
4k views

I'm glad you do/ I'm glad you like the painting (i've drawn) — meaning difference

If someone tells you they really like the painting you've drawn. Could you respond to their telling you that, saying "I'm glad you do.", instead of "I'm glad you like the painting"
3
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1answer
80 views

What is the grammar of this sentence?

Consequently, children are likely to have less supervision at home than was common in the traditional family structure. Could anyone tell me why was common is in this position and what is its meaning?...
0
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0answers
73 views

“Help + noun/pronoun+ to verb, to verb, verb ” or “Help + noun/pronoun+ to verb, verb, verb ”

The United States has provided billions of dollars to help them train more teachers, to modernize transportation, to improve health care, to promote the rights of workers and women, and produce ...
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1answer
1k views

May I drop “is” in constructions like “as is shown by the example of…”?

May I drop "is" in constructions like "as is shown by the example of..."? On the one hand, such reduced variants can be met even in Wikipedia. But on the other hand, I don't quite understand its ...
2
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1answer
4k views

“ourselves” vs “us”

It's also a time to relax our mind and discover ourselves when we stroll around unplanned and without any specific purpose. Could somebody tell me why the writer used ourselves instead of us? I ...
0
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2answers
3k views

Of course you do/don't?

A: I don't understand. B: Of course you do/Of course you don't That's the question, which one is correct in order to confirm what "A" said?