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Questions tagged [ellipsis]

This tag is for questions about the omission of words that are superfluous and/or can be inferred from context.

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2
votes
2answers
359 views

“I thought that I can't do it alone”: Do we need the second 'I'?

I recently saw a sentence like this: I thought that I can't do it alone, but he convinced me that I should at least try. I am almost sure that we can't remove the second 'I' and change the ...
0
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1answer
6k views

What's wrong in the sentence: “I think it best to be well-prepared for the exam”

Is there a flaw in the following sentence? I think it best to be well-prepared for the exam. Should it become this? I think that it is best to be well-prepared for the exam. I am a bit ...
0
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2answers
89 views

Is this omission of the words after “than” correct?

This is my sentence: As a result, calculating the similarities between items should require fewer calculations than between users. What I mean is: As a result, calculating the similarities ...
1
vote
1answer
171 views

If Ida Been Here, Ida Been There

I am curious to know what this sentence mean. One thing I may get right, I think, Ida is short for "I'd have". If Ida Been Here, Ida Been There Album by Craobh Rua, native of Belfast, or so I ...
1
vote
1answer
71 views

What's the omitted subject in sentence “I noticed that you like A and would like to recommend B for you”?

I noticed that you like A and would like to recommend B for you. What I'm trying to say is "I noticed that you like A, and I would like to recommend B for you". But if I read the sentence like this: ...
0
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2answers
59 views

How to drop what follows “can (be)” to avoid repetition?

It is grammatical (I think) to say: "My sister can sing and I also can". But are there correct sentences among the following ones: Some berries cannot be eaten raw, but blackberries can Some berries ...
4
votes
2answers
135 views

How not to repeat words?

Consider the following phrase (a little bit technical, but I hope it doesn't matter): Google Plus doesn’t allow non-public domains at all, Facebook allows domains of the form NAME.l, and Twitter ...
2
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3answers
7k views

Should I use 'neither one', 'none of them' or 'neither one of them' in this question?

I'd like to form this question: Is she beautiful or smart or {neither one/ neither one of them/none of them}? So do I need 'of them' for sure or can I omit 'of them' and say 'neither one' or only ...
0
votes
1answer
57 views

What kind of verb is do when people say “I do”?

I was reading The Wolf's Side of the Story. On the third paragraph, it says Everybody knows the story of the Three Little Pigs. Or at least they think they do. How is "they do" used in this ...
4
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2answers
543 views

But may be you might of heard tell 'bout the price on her head

Well, she ain't no John Wilkes Booth. But may be you might of heard tell 'bout the price on her head. This is a quote from QT's movie the Hateful Eight. I am aware that this is not supposed to be a ...
5
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5answers
143 views

Is “to” always necessary?

Will the meaning of this sentence change if I remove "to" in the second sentence? He wanted to go to the park by himself. But I didn't allow him to.
1
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0answers
145 views

“Much depends on the guilt or innocence…” is 'much' the subject of the sentence?

Much depends on the guilt or innocence of these archetypal “innocents”-- --the first in a long line of allegedly framed leftists from Alger Hiss to the Rosenbergs to Leonard Peltier to Mumia Abu Jamal-...
2
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2answers
169 views

Repeating the verb in a comparison

Which of the following sentences are correct? Mainlanders were actually more likely to be arrested than native Indians Mainlanders were actually more likely to be arrested than native Indians ...
2
votes
1answer
309 views

Use of 'that' and 'for' in “What do you think we can do to help her?”

This question came up in our school test and required the students to translate the sentence from Korean. The sentence they were looking for was... What do you think we can do to help her? ...
17
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4answers
2k views

Why is “of” dropped in 'as X (of) a something'?

Can anyone explain why preposition "of" is deleted in the second sentence? Please provide relevant examples to understand. If there is a certain rule, then what is the name of that rule? ...
1
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2answers
102 views

“I do nothing but!” acceptable ellipsis?

A: You probably do that a lot, don't you? B: I do nothing but! Does that ellipsis in B's answer sound correct?
1
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1answer
116 views

which they were

Which of the following is correct: 1) They were accused of breaking the law, which they were doing. 2) They were accused of breaking the law, which they were. 3) They were accused of breaking the ...
2
votes
1answer
54 views

Parallel Structure - 'print twenty copies first and make sure they deliver them on time'

I read the following script in a TOEIC Speaking book: “Hi, Mohammed. This is Sam. I just got your voicemail about the printing job. I would rather go with the original printer. Maybe you can ask ...
5
votes
1answer
287 views

What is the subject when it's omitted after the comparison?

As market forces penetrate firms and bid up the value of attributes of labor that are more measurable than is the knowledge born of experience, it can be expected that trends in wages will not favor ...
2
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2answers
3k views

“If … or if…” versus if … or

If we consider the following sentences: If we go right or if we climb to the roof, the alarm goes off. If we go right or we climb to the roof, the alarm goes off. Which one is correct?
11
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2answers
1k views

Delete the phrase “I'm” from the sentence by native speaker [duplicate]

I hear many native speakers say, for example, "glad to connect" or "Not sure about that". Where they delete "I am" at the beginning of the sentence, Is that kind of "short the talk", I mean to speak a ...
0
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3answers
423 views

The abbreviations of nonrestrictive adjective clauses

Regarding restrictive and nonrestrictive adjective clauses, I basically know how to use them. However, I am kind of curious about the abbreviation usages of nonrestrictive adjective clauses. For ...
1
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1answer
4k views

Listing skills in CV. Good knowledge or good knowledge of?

I'm writing a CV in English and I want to list my skills. Should I write: Good knowledge: X Y Z or: Good knowledge of: X Y Z I know that a proper form is for ...
0
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3answers
125 views

How to leave out the verb in this sentence

I wrote: Feedback is provided for each incorrect letter and certain options are provided for the user to proceed. Can I say it like these: Feedback is provided for each incorrect letter and ...
2
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2answers
419 views

the meaning of “amid claims”

German prosecutors are re-examining the 1919 murder of the communist leader Rosa Luxemburg, amid claims investigators at the time replaced her corpse with that of another woman. Could you explain ...
3
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2answers
678 views

Short answers with there is/are

There is an apple on a desk. Your friend who can't see it asks, "are there any apples on the desk?" What is the short answer to this question? "Yes, there is" or "Yes, there are." Or vise versa, ...
3
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2answers
35 views

Why doesn't the clause “…and reputation its shadow” need a verb?

The clause "reputation its shadow" in "Character is like a tree and reputation its shadow" has no verb, but is still correct. Please kindly tell me the grammar point used here!
2
votes
1answer
25 views

X's attribute matches y's (attribute)

Which one is/are the correct form(s) my car's yellow matches the jacket's my car's yellow matches the jacket's one my car's yellow matches the jacket's yellow The sentence is supposed to ...
4
votes
1answer
56 views

Placement of “with” before an absolute clause

Normally, there is a selection in advance of a raising cam, with each feeder course being associated with a particular selection device. This sentence has been chosen from "Knitting Technology" by ...
0
votes
1answer
31 views

They are the experts on '“whether” their lives are worth living'

I found the following sentence in The New York Times. When people are in possession of their mental faculties, they are the experts on whether their lives are worth living. (SOURCE) Now see the ...
2
votes
2answers
148 views

whether “you” after “Either” can be used or not

Either you tell me the truth or I will beat you. I'd like to know whether "you" after "Either" can be used or not. Can we omit the first "you", as in: Either tell me the truth or I will beat you.
1
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2answers
1k views

Complicated sentence in “To Kill a Mockingbird”: Meaning of “lest”, and is “might” omitted?

I have another question about the complicated sentence in To Kill a Mockingbird. The complicated sentence is in the paragraph below. Being Southerners, it was a source of shame to some members of ...
0
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1answer
202 views

using of “in order to”

This theological conception of experience is echoed in a 1918 letter to Scholem, in which Benjamin states that all ethics need a foundation in metaphysics, in order to understand "the absolute divine ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

I am certain (that?) I can help (to?) improve your company

in a school book which has an example application letter it says the following: I am certain I can help improve your accounting functions while increasing your company's bottom-line profitability. ...
4
votes
7answers
4k views

You lied to me, and you cheated on me, and you offended me

I would like to know whether the following sentence should be punctuated with comma or not: You lied to me, and you cheated on me, and you offended me. In my language, as the sentence in question ...
2
votes
1answer
288 views

Can the preposition “in” be omitted , in sentence, “you expect to rule the city the way you rule other city.”

I have a question in below sentence. You expect to rule the city the way you rule other city. I think the correct sentence is You expect to rule the city in the way you rule other city. why ...
8
votes
4answers
1k views

“I've been doing this (for) a week” — When do you leave out the 'for' when talking about duration, and when do you not?

The other day I heard someone say: They've been going out a week; I mean, that's not (a) serious (relationship). I wondered if she was speaking correctly, which is presumable, since she was a ...
2
votes
2answers
4k views

Jump or Jump over <something>

"Jump over the turnstile" or "jump the turnstile". I saw in a sentence "jump the turnstile." Then I came to think whether it would be correct to say it like "jump over the turnstile". Would that be ...
3
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2answers
83 views

Is this shortened sentence grammatical?

Here is a sentence from a news article that was translated from Chinese and published in an English-language newspaper in Taiwan: The three-section batons are 65 centimeters long, but when ...
2
votes
1answer
105 views

Need to mention receiving a scholarship “to study” in a country?

I am writing an essay and I wanted to know if it's correct to say I received a scholarship in America. or should it be I received a scholarship to study in America.
3
votes
1answer
14k views

I'm free Thursday / on Thursday [duplicate]

Which one is right? 1 I'm free Thursday. 2 I'm free on Thursday. I thought if you want to say that something happens during a particular day, you should use on, as in 'They’ll be here on ...
2
votes
2answers
4k views

What does “It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated…” mean? (From Lincoln's Gettysburg Address)

Lincoln's Gettysburg Address included a sentence that started like this¹: It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work… What is this construction? It is… for us…...
4
votes
3answers
325 views

How to understand and analyse the expression of “<somebody> returned a hero”? Is there an ellipsis?

I came across the expression of "<somebody> returned a hero" in the context below, With Chonghou in prison, Zeng Jize, son of a celebrated general, Zeng Guofan, was sent to Russia to ...
4
votes
1answer
77 views

Gerund and its meaning in the sentence, being positioned at the end of the sentence

I came across this sentence while watching a video on YouTube. They learn to read and write the formal English of textbooks, but get very little training listening to - and speaking - causal, ...
5
votes
2answers
297 views

Why is there not a preposition (an “on”) between the verb “debut” and the date in this sentence?

I read this sentence: Now, at last, Arctic Deeply will debut Dec. 8, and Setrakian says she is "extremely excited.1 I don't know exactly why it is not "debut on Dec. 8". I reckon it's an ...
3
votes
1answer
186 views

Is “that had been” omitted here?

Among the biggest changes prompted by the scandal was political morality. Is this omitted here? Among the biggest changes that had been prompted by the scandal was political morality.
2
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3answers
505 views

Use of grateful

I have seen some people using 'grateful' in the beginning of a statement like. Grateful, if you can send me the details of the conference, Can someone tell me if this usage is correct or not?
1
vote
1answer
163 views

Repeat “let” and/or “be”? Example: Let A be a line and (let?) B (be?) a plane

While fixing my notation in a research article, I want to write something like this: Let A be a line and (let) B (be) a plane. Question: Do I have to write the second let and be or can I omit one ...
3
votes
3answers
125 views

Must 'are' follow 'nor'?

Great campaigns aren’t easily forgotten. Nor are those who created them. I want to change the above to: Great campaigns aren’t easily forgotten, Nor those who created them. Would that be ...
0
votes
1answer
104 views

Do Americans usually omit relative pronoun in oral English?

I learnt from this answer that the relative pronoun cannot be omitted in the following sentence: I have a lived experience and I think one of the challenges with regards to mental illness ...