Questions tagged [etymology]

This tag is for questions about the historical origin of a word. Please consider asking this question on English Language & Usage (http://english.stackexchange.com/) instead.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
25
votes
2answers
3k views

Why is there a 'p' in "assumption" but not in "assume"?

I know a little bit about the suffix -tion. It is usually added to verbs. Examples: -domination (from dominate), -admiration (admire), -deviation (deviate), -ejection (eject). "Exemption (...
4
votes
2answers
3k views

Etymology of "dog slow"

When I think of dogs I have an image of them being fast animals, running and jumping, chasing a ball or another dog. So, I am surprised that dog slow means very slow. What is the etymology of this ...
4
votes
2answers
205 views

a fighting for the glory - how do you understand this type of grammar?

A stanza from a song called John Paul Jones by Johnny Horton: When John Paul was a captain in the U.S. Naval Band A fightin' for the glory and the freedom of our land He made those British ...
5
votes
1answer
298 views

Pronunciation rules for "CH" and "arch-"

Yesterday I was watching Pokémon where I encountered this word "archenemy". It is definitely not the first time I am hearing it, though it is the first time I am putting thought into it. ...
5
votes
4answers
3k views

What's the relation between "categorical" and "category"?

categorical and category look quite similar. I also search the etymology on google as follows, which shows there is a connection between them. But categorical means "unambiguously explicit and direct",...
1
vote
2answers
3k views

"Funny": origin and evolution of the peculiar side of things?

The adjective "funny" (from fun) is relatively recent: Funny (adj.) "humorous," 1756, from fun (n.) + -y (2). Meaning "strange, odd, causing perplexity" is by 1806, said to be originally U.S. ...