Questions tagged [expressions]

This tag is for questions which a dictionary cannot answer asking the meaning of a particular expression.

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Is this expression clear and idiomatic, “Mathematically, is 21 ideal for Blackjack in some sense”?

I asked a question just now, where I would like discuss if 21 is in some sense ideal. Mathematically, is 21 ideal for Blackjack in some sense? Is this expression clear and idiomatic?
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2answers
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Which one is more grammatical and idiomatic, “view something is” or “view something as”?

The lecturer is saying Something hits you really hard and then goes away, and then nothing happens for a very long period of time. And you'll learn this in the future, you can kind of view ...
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2answers
20 views

Is this expression “whose definition” idiomatic?

I asked a question just now I am learning 𝐿𝑝 space, whose definition is based on function spaces. Is this expression "whose definition" idiomatic?
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1answer
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Is it reasonable to say this description a little bit wordy?

This post says ... dividing the number thus obtained by the total number of observations, so as to obtain the proportion of observations that is less than or equal to x. According to my own ...
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1answer
31 views

I wonder how native English speaker perceives 'make' in this expression

"make landfall" e.g, The hurricane made landfall. I know what "landfall" means. I know "make landfall" means "to reach or hit or strike a certain area." But I can't understand well the meaning of "...
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1answer
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How to express the meaning that I am trying to figure out a concept?

I asked a question just now What an input space exactly is in the context of machine learning? I am not sure where should I put "exactly", which one in the following is more appropriate? What an ...
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1answer
19 views

Is this mathematical explanation of “except” and “other than” right?

This question is derived from this one. Assume "not including" and "including" have two mutually exclusive meanings. It is impossible "not including" and "including" at the same time. The Oxford ...
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2answers
48 views

Are “right now” and “currently” exchangeably here?

Chapter 2 of the book "C++ Primer Plus, 6th Edition by Stephen Prata (2012)" says Right now the main point to remember is that C++ syntax requires you to begin the definition of the main() function ...
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2answers
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About parenthetical expressions, is the sentence grammartically correct?

This novel method has significantly improved the research period from one year in previous attempts, due to a lack of observatory data, to the longest year with reliable documentary data, 100 ...
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1answer
14 views

Does “**societies**” here mean “groups of people” or “registered organizations”?

This page says In the decades since the 1960s, ACM, along with leading professional and scientific computing societies, has endeavored to tailor curriculum recommendations to the rapidly changing ...
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1answer
20 views

Which one is more appropriate, “only loves baseball” or “loves only baseball”?

I asked a question just now. I am not sure if this sentence is grammatical and idiomatic. the guy only loves baseball in the scope of available options. Is this case, which one is more ...
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1answer
26 views

Which pair is exchangeable, “besides” and “aside from” or “except for” and “aside from”?

This is one of the examples from cambridge dict. Do you play any other sports besides basketball? Oxford dict consider "besides", "except for" and "aside from" are synonyms. To simplify the ...
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1answer
37 views

Is “there also are” a grammatical and idiomatic expression?

Consider this sentence - Besides square brackets, there are double quotation, braces, and so on. Is it a grammatical and idiomatic expression to say as follow? Besides square brackets, ...
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What is the difference between “… are produced by …” and “… are those that would be produced by …”?

The doc says The comprehension consists of a single expression followed by at least one for clause and zero or more for or if clauses. In this case, the elements of the new container are those that ...
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2answers
32 views

Is it reasonable to say “aside from” means a set does not include something

Oxford dictionary gives this example sentence about "aside from". A full scale search was launched and thankfully she was found unharmed, aside from suffering from the cold. Is it reasonable to ...
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1answer
35 views

Is “get a better understanding about some concept/mechanism” a grammatical, idiomatic and clear expression?

I asked a question just now. I am trying to get a better understanding about this procedure of Python code to be generated. similarly people may say these get a better understanding about ...
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4answers
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“Literally” Vs “In the true sense of the word”

The Cambridge and other dictionaries say that "literally" can be used as an emphasis on something. But there is another term: "in the true sense of the word", which to mea has a quite similar meaning ...
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1answer
17 views

When talking about `apply for` certain operators, `apply to` is more appropriate, is my understanding right?

this doc says Some additional rules apply for certain operators (e.g., a string as a left argument to the ‘%’ operator). Extensions must define their own conversion behavior. per cambridge, when ...
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1answer
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Does 'getting ages' idiomatically sound natural?

We're usually taught (in Korea) to say getting old to describe that something/someone is aging, but I found out this can sound unnecessarily exaggerated as if it's running out of its lifespan. To tone ...
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0answers
15 views

Is the expression “does any of” grammatical, idiomatic and clear?

I asked a question just now. Does any of Python, Java, bash, lua use statement separator? (Python, Java, bash, lua are programming/script language.) Is the expression "does any of ... do" ...
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1answer
30 views

An idiom to mean: to accept / expand someone's statements in formal speech

Let's assume you and someone else (say: Dr. Adam) are giving speech in a meeting. Dr. Adam says something and after his remarks and statements, you'd like to say: I accept Dr. Adam's statements ...
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1answer
18 views

Wordchoice: to barbecue something or to have a barbecue

I've been wondering whether there is a distinction between to barbecue sth. and to have a barbecue I suppose to barbecue something is the act of barbecuing (grilling) food. and having a barbecue ...
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2answers
38 views

American Equivalent for “roll on something”

Roll on something As you perhaps know, Britons tend to use this term to imply how much they like something happen and when they wish a specific time or event would come more quickly. Example: ...
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2answers
42 views

A proverb / saying that says: keep away from people because they have potential to harm you

I am looking for a derogatory proverb including a negative approach toward social associations that conveys the meassage that it would be better to stay away from most of the people! Because many of ...
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A proverb to imply that “you often love those who are far from you”

I am looking for a proverb or a fixed expression in current English (not an archaic and as a result far from people's literary knowledge) which encapsulates the following message: When people we ...
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3answers
61 views

“there are no special names for each city”

I got this question: What names are most common in your hometown? My answer: There are traditional names like "Jake", "Jacob" and "Holmes", but they are used across the whole country, and there ...
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1answer
33 views

“square of a” or “squared a”, which one is more idiomatic in the context of academic, such as a textbook?

"square of a" is equal to the product of a and itself. to refer to this, "square of a" or "squared a", which one is more idiomatic in the context of academic, such as a textbook?
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1answer
17 views

An idiom for “as far as it is related to me,…”

Scenario #1: Let's suppose a top student is going to give a speech at school and would like to express his gratitude to his teacher for all his efforts in one educational year. I was wondering how he ...
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1answer
14 views

Which one is correct understanding about this sentence? The .. data are generated by a … over datasets called the data generating process

the deep learning book says The train and test data are generated by a probability distribution over datasets called the data generating process here are 2 understandings: [The train and test ...
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2answers
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What does “This is all” mean in this particular case?

This post says This is all in the context of the data-generating distribution (or underlying distribution of the data). You can check another answer I made for more details on this. Remove the "in ...
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2answers
23 views

Is it reasonable to simplify “Checking for existing SSH keys” to “Check existing SSH keys”?

I am learning this post, whose title is "Checking for existing SSH keys". Checking for existing SSH keys Before you generate an SSH key, you can check to see if you have any existing SSH keys. ...
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1answer
25 views

Can someone help to understand this? “The speedup of a program, coming from …, was derived to be principally limited by …”

This post says The speedup of a program, coming from using multiple processors in parallel computing, was derived to be ( maybe to a surprise of audience ) principally limited by the very fraction ...
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1answer
35 views

“what are you in the mood of today” is it correct?

"what are you in the mood of today" is that a correct way of asking someone what they wanna do (moodwise) i know " what do you feel like doing " is more common way but just wanna know whether the ...
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3answers
47 views

“didnt have the phone to myself yesterday” it it correct?

"I didn't have the phone to myself yesterday" Is that a correct sentence and a way of telling someone that your phone was not with you yesterday and that is why you couldn't reply
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0answers
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Use of “I feel like it.” [duplicate]

Does "I feel like it/that" has exactly the same meaning as "I want to do it/that"? If it doesn't, what could be the difference between these two?
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1answer
33 views

“The professor does the attendance in his room” is grammatically correct?

I know that attendance for students means "being present in the class". How can I say that the professor answers the doubts questions in his room, for example Mondays between 4 and 5 pm? Could it be ...
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0answers
26 views

Grate on someone's ears / nerves

What does the sentence below mean? His voice grates on my ears. His voice grates on my nerves. Please have a look on Longman's definition below: To grate on (to annoy someone):  - Mr ...
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1answer
18 views

“Hoarseness” Vs “frog in one's throat”

Do the two expressions/idioms: to have a frog in one's throat to be hoarse mean the same thing or they have different connotations and usages? If they differ I wonder if you kindly let me know ...
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2answers
32 views

What does “get your hands wet” mean in the context of programming? How can I use this phrase properly?

A lot of programmers/software engineers tell new guys "get your hands wet". What does that mean? Does that mean "do it yourself"? This book says Before you get your hands wet trying your first ...
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1answer
50 views

When a youth's voice becomes “manly”

I wonder how would you talk about a voice breaking in young males - around the age of puberty? This is when they lose their high-pitched voices and start to produce deeper sounds. What shall I say: ...
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26 views

How to ask someone to keep their voice down

Please imagine two people are about to fight. They are threatening and warning each other. One of them wants to ask the other one to speak to them not that loudly. What shall he say? The only ...
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0answers
50 views

Are there 2 distances?

I've searched on Cambridge, Merriam-Webster and Oxford. Only Oxford says "distance" is countable. Assume there are 3 points in a 2d Euclidean space, point A=(A𝑥,A𝑦); point B=(B𝑥,B𝑦); point C=(C�...
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2answers
338 views

When one problem is added to the previous one

Let's assume has a big problem and is dealing with it. While he has not solved the first problem, another problem comes up and adds to the previous one. I wonder how you would explain this situation ...
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1answer
25 views

Is there a term/word/phrase to express “only used in a specific topic”?

a comments in this post says I see no "dot product", which usually refers to vectors. This is a matrix product which means the term "dot product" is only used for vectors, and the term "matrix ...
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9answers
932 views

To get so rich that you are not in need of anymore money

I wonder if there is an informal idiom to say that someone made so much money that became needless of any more money and retired themselves (meaning that from then on they work only for fun / pleasure ...
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2answers
42 views

What does “down to a few yards” mean? [closed]

I found this in a book that I'm reading. It says the following: the mist was so thick, however, that visibility was down to a few yards What does the phrase "down to a few yards" mean, taking ...
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1answer
68 views

“Overcome” Vs “Get over” Vs “Get the better of”

To me, all the three choices: Overcome Get over Get the better of mean so much the close things that can be often used interchangeably (at least in my two made up examples below.) I would ...
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1answer
26 views

Question On “Get” [closed]

1.Let's say a woman is drowning in a lake and a man who happens to notice her drowning has thrown away a rope towards her and he says "Get the rope!". In this situation, can this sentence "Get the ...
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1answer
18 views

Is this expression idiomatic and clear? “A, B, C constitute a partition; X, Y constitute the other partition”

I answered a question just now. this is an array (a group/list of numbers) array([ 2, 1, 3, 6, 7, 9, 15]) which is divided into 2 partitions, so I said [2, 1, 3, 6, 7] constitute the left ...
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1answer
18 views

When expressing “by using the Python programming language”, should I use “with”, “in” or something else?

This post uses this title Extract specific pages of PDF and save it with Python This post uses this title Finding the index of an item given a list containing it in Python Both of the examples ...