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22 views

Making one's own word / opinion the one that counts

I am looking for an idiom/expression which implies defeating the opponent in a debate / an argument / a discussion and making one's own word / opinion the one that counts. I know the idiom "have the ...
2
votes
4answers
67 views

To beat someone in a competition/debate/etc in a humiliating way

What is the most common informal/casual idiom / expression / verb to imply making someone feel defeated in a humiliating way in AE? For instance, let's say two youngsters are playing soccer against ...
3
votes
1answer
37 views

Idiom for a doctor telling a patient that he's terminally ill

Suppose a doctor is telling his patient that he is terminally ill and he's got only a few months to live. I assume this kind of situation can be described concisely with this form, A doctor is X-...
1
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2answers
41 views

What's the origin of “price of fish”?

I heard an old song by Scooter where he sings "How much is the fish?", realizing that it sounds so irrelevant and stupid that it might be something idiomatic with it. Turns out it's an expression ...
4
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4answers
3k views

“Literally” Vs “In the true sense of the word”

The Cambridge and other dictionaries say that "literally" can be used as an emphasis on something. But there is another term: "in the true sense of the word", which to mea has a quite similar meaning ...
1
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1answer
27 views

Does 'getting ages' idiomatically sound natural?

We're usually taught (in Korea) to say getting old to describe that something/someone is aging, but I found out this can sound unnecessarily exaggerated as if it's running out of its lifespan. To tone ...
0
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1answer
41 views

An idiom to mean: to accept / expand someone's statements in formal speech

Let's assume you and someone else (say: Dr. Adam) are giving speech in a meeting. Dr. Adam says something and after his remarks and statements, you'd like to say: I accept Dr. Adam's statements ...
0
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2answers
39 views

American Equivalent for “roll on something”

Roll on something As you perhaps know, Britons tend to use this term to imply how much they like something happen and when they wish a specific time or event would come more quickly. Example: ...
0
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2answers
52 views

A proverb / saying that says: keep away from people because they have potential to harm you

I am looking for a derogatory proverb including a negative approach toward social associations that conveys the meassage that it would be better to stay away from most of the people! Because many of ...
1
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1answer
17 views

An idiom for “as far as it is related to me,…”

Scenario #1: Let's suppose a top student is going to give a speech at school and would like to express his gratitude to his teacher for all his efforts in one educational year. I was wondering how he ...
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0answers
39 views

Grate on someone's ears / nerves

What does the sentence below mean? His voice grates on my ears. His voice grates on my nerves. Please have a look on Longman's definition below: To grate on (to annoy someone):  - Mr ...
1
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1answer
18 views

“Hoarseness” Vs “frog in one's throat”

Do the two expressions/idioms: to have a frog in one's throat to be hoarse mean the same thing or they have different connotations and usages? If they differ I wonder if you kindly let me know ...
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1answer
52 views

When a youth's voice becomes “manly”

I wonder how would you talk about a voice breaking in young males - around the age of puberty? This is when they lose their high-pitched voices and start to produce deeper sounds. What shall I say: ...
2
votes
2answers
357 views

When one problem is added to the previous one

Let's assume has a big problem and is dealing with it. While he has not solved the first problem, another problem comes up and adds to the previous one. I wonder how you would explain this situation ...
3
votes
9answers
941 views

To get so rich that you are not in need of anymore money

I wonder if there is an informal idiom to say that someone made so much money that became needless of any more money and retired themselves (meaning that from then on they work only for fun / pleasure ...
-2
votes
1answer
74 views

“Overcome” Vs “Get over” Vs “Get the better of”

To me, all the three choices: Overcome Get over Get the better of mean so much the close things that can be often used interchangeably (at least in my two made up examples below.) I would ...
-1
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1answer
38 views

(As you mentioned / pointed out) and (Thank you for mentioning / pointing out)

I know that when you 'point something out' you have already found something important with that and would like the listener(s) know about it too in order to draw their attention to it. Now, please ...
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0answers
51 views

A current equivalent for “I'll eat my hat if…”

When I was going to emphasize that something seemed to be truly unlikely to take place, I used to say: "I eat my hat if...", but I just noticed that it is an old-fashioned phrase! As an example, I ...
0
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1answer
47 views

When one has a spouse that they do not deserve him / her

There is a hyperbole which says always a best husband/wife belongs to somebody who really doesn't deserve him/her! For instance, a quite gorgeous girl with a high educational degree and good family, ...
4
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2answers
609 views

“In charge of” vs “Responsible for”

I would appreciate it if you could let me know what phrase can ne used in the following blanks: 1- Everybody is ................. their own actions. So you cannot blame others for what you did in ...
2
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2answers
224 views

“Off the top of one's head” or “by heart”

I wonder which expression can be used in my following example? Our teacher was a really smart person. At the second session, he know everyone's name ................ off the top of his head from ...
0
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1answer
32 views

Is the idiomatic “didn't bat an eye” losing its sense if used slightly differently?

The expression didn't bat an eye is well recognized. As an idiomatic such, one has to be careful not to tamper with it too much risking its integrity. However, I did use it in a bit different ...
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1answer
23 views

Playing for bragging rights

What does playing for bragging rights mean in English and is it common and understood in everyday speech by all people? I have found some dictionary definitions, but I couldn't understand its precise ...
0
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1answer
37 views

The meaning and the usage of the expression “Dare I say…”

Macmillan dictionary says: Dare I say: Used when you are saying something that you think other people may not like: This famous novel is a little, dare I say it, dull. Or as Longman says: ...
0
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1answer
28 views

The meaning and the usage of the expression “Don't you dare”

To me, "Don't you dare!" is an expression that communicates a warning to someone. For instance: Don't you dare talk to me like that! Don't you dare follow me! (ete...) But I wonder if you ...
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1answer
25 views

The meaning and the usage of the expression: “I dare say”

Some dictionaries have defined the expression "I dare say / daresay" as spoken one and some other ones have defined it as a formal expression! Meanwhile, some dictionaries consider it to be old-...
1
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2answers
50 views

Get up enough nerves to do something

I wonder what does the expression "get up enough nerves to do something" mean as in the following context? My mother was feeling very bad as she sat on the couch looking at all of her children, but ...
2
votes
1answer
39 views

“Performing one's working duties” or “Pulling one's weight”

I wonder whether as for an employee who neglects their working duties we can say: 1- He doesn't pull his weight --> I doubt if it works in this case, while according to the dictionaries "pull one's ...
2
votes
2answers
28 views

An idiom/expression to imply “rebuilding and beautifying a destroyed area”

Please imagine a large destroyed area which has become ruined due to a war or an earthquake or simply because it was uninhabited for a long time or even from the outset. I wonder what idiom/verb or ...
0
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3answers
30 views

Paying/spending just from pocket money

I wonder what idiom, expression or set-phrase do you normally use to carry the message of spending money from pocket without earning any money (without having any business)? Please have a look on my ...
1
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2answers
33 views

A rich and family which is living in comfort and luxury

I Wonder what do you call a family which is most of the time rich and all its members are living a good life and have whatever they need? The idiom/expression/set phrase or even the adjective in my ...
0
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1answer
29 views

When someone acts obstinately / stubbornly towards you

I have a very long-lasting question about some quite close concepts which I am sure they have some equivalents in current English. I really appreciate it if you could do me a favor and let me find the ...
0
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1answer
30 views

Making up illogical, unreasonable and unimportant excuses/objections

What do you call the the action of making up or seeking very illogical, unreasonable and unimportant ("excuses") or/and ("objections"). I wonder what idiom/expression/verb do you normally use for that?...
2
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1answer
19 views

How to say that you smoke sometimes and only for fun?

I wonder what do you normally say when you as a smoker would like to indicate that you do not smoke too much and you just do it sometimes and for fun? I'm not a heavy smoker. I......................
0
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1answer
42 views

Meaning of “is getting on me..”?

What's mean "is getting on me"? For example: "Mom is always getting on me about not finishing my breakfast."
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0answers
17 views

Entering through legal / illegal solutions

Let's say that as a business man you have some problems with the tax ministry of your country. You are a very wealthy and influential individual that have friends in high places. Therefore it would ...
0
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1answer
64 views

What is the most common sarcastic response to something you already know?

How sarcastically imply someone who is trying to teach you something that you are well aware in that case Edited: I am going to find an up-to-date English metaphorical and sarcastic expression or ...
1
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2answers
60 views

An English equivalent for “all truth will not bear telling”

We all believe that telling the truth is fine. But sometimes there are some occasions in which you'de better keep someone in the dark about something (possibly on their own or someone else's favor) or ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

An expression / a proverb to say: “liars often forget what they said”

As you may confronted some liars, you possibly would confirm that usually they forget what they have made-up and then related to you in the past and it's not unlekely that once they will forget in the ...
0
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1answer
29 views

To do somebody a favor

The Free Dictionary says: To do (someone or oneself) a favor means: To help someone else, typically at their request. In this usage, the person being helped is stated between "do" and "a." ...
0
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1answer
95 views

“A cold fish” vs “an icy person”

How do the similar expressions below can be distinguished from one another? Icy person: If you describe a person or their behaviour as icy, you mean that they are not affectionate or friendly, ...
1
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1answer
21 views

A modern substitue for “kith and kin”

In old-fashioned English, the term "kith and kin" encompass all the people you've been connected with, including the nuclear and extended family members. What is its modern substitute if exists? ...
0
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1answer
12 views

A place composed of many nations and races

What do you call humorously or in casual English a country / city which is comprised of many races from various provinces of the same country or other countries? Is there any specific term, expression ...
4
votes
1answer
201 views

The usage of “run a mile” in a sentence

The phrase "run a mile" means: To try to avoid a situation or a person because you are embarrassed or frightened. Based on this definition, I wonder if you could let me know whether the following ...
2
votes
1answer
18 views

An influential person / a very influential person who can pull strings in your favor

What do you call an influential connection in an organization or a governmental entity who can help you out of problems related to that organization or even more powerful one who has relations in ...
0
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2answers
20 views

When you're going to discover the amount of someone's financial loss

Let's suppose you have lost a specific amount of money in a deal and your partner is going to find out how much it had been. What shall he ask you? Once, I had a close American friend who had ...
0
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2answers
40 views

An expression/idiom/proverb to say “losing a small amount would be much better than losing everything”

Is there any common English expression, idiom or proverb which implies: Stop and accept a small loss, rather than continue and risk losing everything. When someone is losing or possibly would lose ...
0
votes
1answer
24 views

Beating one's head against the wall / a brick wall

Dictionaries say that the idiom "beating one's head against the wall" means: To attempt continuously and fruitlessly to accomplish some task or achieve some goal that is or seems ultimately ...
0
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1answer
36 views

When you are a role model for children

What does a child do (the verb / idiom / expression) when they look at their elderly and try to do what they are doing? E.g. it is said that you'd better be careful when you're smoking etc. so that ...
1
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2answers
48 views

An obvious model/example/type of someone or something

There is an expression in our current language which has entered from legal jargon into the common language. (I'm trying to translate it.) We say something like: He/she is an obvious example/...