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22
votes
9answers
17k views

Phrases that express “afraid of wife” in English

Are there any English idioms that are used to describe a man being afraid of wife? In Chinese there are lots of ways to express it, formal ways, condescending, or colorful. Please describe the ...
21
votes
6answers
22k views

If something seems too good to be true, it probably is (not?)

I've bumped into the following expression a few times already: If something seems too good to be true, it probably is. To me, the correct way to say it would be: If something seems too good to ...
8
votes
8answers
8k views

Is there any expressions related to eyes which means extremely tired in English?

In Chinese, we use an expression which literally "I'm so tired and my eyes could only focus on one point (or my eyeballs can not move anymore)" after a long workday to express that we are extremely ...
8
votes
4answers
6k views

Explanation of “does there exist”?

I wrote in a forum: Does exists any other approaches? Someone suggests me to write: Does there exist any other approaches? I made some researches on the web and I found that the latter ...
7
votes
1answer
25k views

Is “fugazi” an English word?

The British rock band Marillion has a song called Fugazi, which is also the title of the album. This is one of their lines: Do you realise, this world is totally fugazi. By context I can deduce ...
6
votes
4answers
27k views

Difference and usage between “I dare say” and “dare I say it”

I dare say is defined on Dictionary.com as: to venture to say (something); assume (something) as probable. I've also heard of the expression dare I say it as well; however, I was unable to find a ...
6
votes
3answers
2k views

To look “forced”

I was talking to a girl in English and in personal, friendly and non-formal situation. The girl behaved like she...was obligated to speak with me like she did. It was just a feeling that she had some ...
6
votes
1answer
185 views

What does 'thrown off his mojo' mean?

i want to use this term as someone who is kind of swooned and throw rationality to the wind because of the impact of someone else. Would that expression do?
5
votes
6answers
1k views

Contextual expression and Get/Got It

First context If I taught something to my students and wanted to check whether they understood me or not, what should I say ? second context If I were to ask them whether they are following me or ...
5
votes
1answer
749 views

What image lies behind the expression “Take a bow”?

I heard this expression in the Rihanna's eponymic song. I understand the general meaning, but where does it come from? What is the image behind?
5
votes
2answers
4k views

Why does he say, “Shame I can't say the same …”?

Here is an excerpt from HeadWay Upper Intermediate, Student's Book, Unit 1: Even after four years, I don't feel I belong. Over Christmas I went back to the UK for a month's holiday - on landing at ...
4
votes
4answers
3k views

“Literally” Vs “In the true sense of the word”

The Cambridge and other dictionaries say that "literally" can be used as an emphasis on something. But there is another term: "in the true sense of the word", which to mea has a quite similar meaning ...
4
votes
2answers
397 views

“In charge of” vs “Responsible for”

I would appreciate it if you could let me know what phrase can ne used in the following blanks: 1- Everybody is ................. their own actions. So you cannot blame others for what you did in ...
4
votes
1answer
189 views

The usage of “run a mile” in a sentence

The phrase "run a mile" means: To try to avoid a situation or a person because you are embarrassed or frightened. Based on this definition, I wonder if you could let me know whether the following ...
3
votes
9answers
937 views

To get so rich that you are not in need of anymore money

I wonder if there is an informal idiom to say that someone made so much money that became needless of any more money and retired themselves (meaning that from then on they work only for fun / pleasure ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

Usage of “on cloud nine”?

I heard "I'm on cloud nine" in a song and realized it was an expression by reading it somewhere else. I am learning English for years but I never heard of that before. I found informations about the ...
3
votes
4answers
15k views

Is there any phrase or idiom meaning “I wish you were there too” or “it was good if you were there also”?

In Persian we have an idiom literally meaning "I wish you were there too" or "it was good if you were there also". For example, if you had been in party and a friend had not been there you may say ...
3
votes
2answers
189 views

Is there any particular expression for this?

Okay, the following is what I want to say. But it is too long. So I want to find a better way to express it (the bold), using some idioms or short phrases. Your friend caught a cold. So he took ...
3
votes
1answer
894 views

Use of name as a verb

I heard these lines in the movie Minions. They go like Stuart: "Scarlet." Scarlet: "Don't you Scarlet me backstabbing little traitors." The name Scarlet is used here as a verb. What do this ...
3
votes
2answers
296 views

Is there any similar idiom/proverb to Japanese proverb -Gesu no kanguri

There is a saying 下衆の勘繰り(Gesu no kanguri) in Japanese. "Gesu" means a person who is mean, lowly, or base in his/her heart. "Kanguri" means interpreting falsely someone's intention as bad. A ...
3
votes
1answer
1k views

Putting “foot in mouth” or “foot in it”?

I know the expression putting foot in ones mouth and I'm not asking about its meaning. However, as I was verifying that I got the idiom perfectly correct, I stumbled upon the following example ...
3
votes
1answer
24 views

An expression or idiom to describe “magnifying” a news or an occurance

How would you call the action of someone who hears a news, magnifies it and then transmits it to someone else which would resault in an untrue story about (somebody / an event) comparing the original ...
3
votes
1answer
31 views

Idiom for a doctor telling a patient that he's terminally ill

Suppose a doctor is telling his patient that he is terminally ill and he's got only a few months to live. I assume this kind of situation can be described concisely with this form, A doctor is Xing ...
2
votes
2answers
351 views

When one problem is added to the previous one

Let's assume has a big problem and is dealing with it. While he has not solved the first problem, another problem comes up and adds to the previous one. I wonder how you would explain this situation ...
2
votes
4answers
2k views

What does “You're a stroke of genius” mean?

I was playing Max Payne 3 and this dialogue appeared in one of the cutscenes "Wilson Da Silva," replies Max, "You're a stroke of genius!" Can anybody explain what it means?
2
votes
1answer
116 views

Is “home run” the equivalent of four bases?

We were all more naive a decade ago. We hoped that a single application of drugs would result in a dramatic benefit. We now understand it's much more complicated than that. People are optimistic but ...
2
votes
2answers
199 views

“Off the top of one's head” or “by heart”

I wonder which expression can be used in my following example? Our teacher was a really smart person. At the second session, he know everyone's name ................ off the top of his head from ...
2
votes
2answers
263 views

Even some useless stuff would be of use some day

Is there any common idiom or expression in English which can convey such a message that: anything that is of no use, will be used someday for sure. It is a translated proverb which believes do not ...
2
votes
1answer
19 views

How to say that you smoke sometimes and only for fun?

I wonder what do you normally say when you as a smoker would like to indicate that you do not smoke too much and you just do it sometimes and for fun? I'm not a heavy smoker. I......................
2
votes
1answer
28k views

Joke's on you or Jokes on you

I hear that idiom quite often but honestly don't know if it's "Joke is on you" or "Jokes on you". The pronunciation is basically the same, and it's mostly used in speech. So, is there a correct way or ...
2
votes
1answer
508 views

A sly expression for a 'one day chance meeting'

Considering a situation where I once met a guy just for a day and we somehow developed a bond due to the circumstances we were in—helping each other and sharing mutual ideas... but never ...
2
votes
2answers
328 views

When someones does everything he is asked to do (expression)

Is there an expression to use when someone does not do something or does something, because, for example, he does not want to offend that person or upset him. For example, your close friend asks ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

How to use the expression “throw oneself into something”

I have recently learned the expression "throw oneself into something", but I am kind of confused about how to use it in daily conversation. Could anyone explain me this, with some examples? For ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

What does the idiom “wings of fortune” mean? [closed]

The idiom "wings of fortune" can be found in writing. For example, near the end of the Grateful Dead song Terrapin Station, it says: The sullen wings of fortune beat like rain Many older books ...
2
votes
2answers
26 views

An idiom/expression to imply “rebuilding and beautifying a destroyed area”

Please imagine a large destroyed area which has become ruined due to a war or an earthquake or simply because it was uninhabited for a long time or even from the outset. I wonder what idiom/verb or ...
2
votes
1answer
36 views

“Performing one's working duties” or “Pulling one's weight”

I wonder whether as for an employee who neglects their working duties we can say: 1- He doesn't pull his weight --> I doubt if it works in this case, while according to the dictionaries "pull one's ...
2
votes
1answer
18 views

An influential person / a very influential person who can pull strings in your favor

What do you call an influential connection in an organization or a governmental entity who can help you out of problems related to that organization or even more powerful one who has relations in ...
2
votes
1answer
231 views

Idiom for nepotism

When someone has connections in an organization, he can use it to good advantage to, for example, get his son a job in a company. We say: He pulled strings/wires to get his son the job in the ...
2
votes
1answer
135 views

Ask your crush out

I found that when you want to ask whether he or she can go dating with you, you say " ask him or her out" And also I found when you have a crush on someone and that is one-sided love, you call the ...
2
votes
1answer
137 views

What is the meaning of “a buzzy sensation” in the paragraph below?

He told himself he could do this. He felt a shiver of excitement, then a buzzy sensation. If he made it through the night without sleeping, he'd be a different person, somehow. A more important ...
2
votes
3answers
6k views

English saying similar/equivalent to: “When you give, you receive twice as much.”

In Greece we have a saying: If you give, you will receive twice as much. Does an equivalent saying exist in English, and if so, what is it?
2
votes
2answers
596 views

I can't even with this place (meaning)

In this movie clip (at 2:01), actor Jack Black says: That was so intense I, like, can't even with this place. What does he mean he can't even with the place?
2
votes
0answers
55 views

“to think my country is at the first place.” [duplicate]

I happened to find a chart showing a rank of countries based on their frequent use of VPNs. Someone wrote "to think my country is at the first place." (and this was the only sentence he wrote) What ...
1
vote
2answers
48 views

Get up enough nerves to do something

I wonder what does the expression "get up enough nerves to do something" mean as in the following context? My mother was feeling very bad as she sat on the couch looking at all of her children, but ...
1
vote
1answer
27 views

Does 'getting ages' idiomatically sound natural?

We're usually taught (in Korea) to say getting old to describe that something/someone is aging, but I found out this can sound unnecessarily exaggerated as if it's running out of its lifespan. To tone ...
1
vote
2answers
56 views

An English equivalent for “all truth will not bear telling”

We all believe that telling the truth is fine. But sometimes there are some occasions in which you'de better keep someone in the dark about something (possibly on their own or someone else's favor) or ...
1
vote
2answers
46 views

An obvious model/example/type of someone or something

There is an expression in our current language which has entered from legal jargon into the common language. (I'm trying to translate it.) We say something like: He/she is an obvious example/...
1
vote
2answers
93 views

An equivalent for the proverb “A creaking door hangs longest or…”

Please have a look on the following scenarios and let me know what is the current English equivalent for the meaning in my question that can be used to fill in the blanks: Please imagine a couple ...
1
vote
1answer
74 views

Poor aesthetic judgement

Is there a way to say that someone has a very poor aesthetic judgement? For example, you go to a house and you think everything is tacky or just ugly. How can you call the owner of the house? I tend ...
1
vote
2answers
40 views

What's the origin of “price of fish”?

I heard an old song by Scooter where he sings "How much is the fish?", realizing that it sounds so irrelevant and stupid that it might be something idiomatic with it. Turns out it's an expression ...