All Questions

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
1
vote
1answer
19 views

'Under' preposition meaning?

The war between Iran and Iraq lasted under a decade and caused a great deal of bloodshed. Is this under usage equal to by, some, nearly ... etc, or throughout, through ... etc, or else none of them ?
1
vote
1answer
12 views

what's the right choice talking about specific time of the day, at or in?

I believe At is used for : specific time and Holiday period and IN is used for: months, years,Decades, century,season and time period. But when I try google translator with both options: At night.......
0
votes
1answer
46 views

Can “lot” stand without the article 'a' to mean “so much”?

Thank you for [...]. It means lot! Thank you for [...]. It means a lot! Can the first sentence be used instead of the second one when wanting to give the word a different value than the one in ...
1
vote
1answer
19 views

“Get {something} through to {somebody}” vs. “Get {something} across to {somebody}”

How do these expressions differ? Does one of them sound more forceful to you? For instance, in the following sentence, does using each one make any change in meaning: What are you trying to get ...
1
vote
2answers
28 views

“Join us!” vs “Join in us!”

I ran today into a weird piece of English. We were a few colleagues chit-chatting on the hallway at work. Another colleague passed by, and we invited him to chat with us. I expected the invitation ...
0
votes
1answer
135 views

I go on the business trip

I go on the business trip. Why the above sentence use "on " as the preposition but not "to"?
2
votes
2answers
429 views

“Welcome on my website” or “Welcome to my website”

I want to know how to say "Bienvenu sur mon site" in English. I hesitate between the preposition to and the preposition on Welcome to my website! or Welcome on my website! I've found on ...
0
votes
1answer
124 views

I'm all in to <verb> vs. I'm all in ~ing

I know there is an idiom 'be in' to describe someone is totally immersed in something, but I've never seen the usage where that 'something' is described along with the idiom 'be in'. For example, is ...
0
votes
1answer
38 views

“Membership **to** physics-related entities”?

This is a question that cropped-up while John Doe was preparing the English version of his CV. He wanted to include a section wherein he was to list some of the physics societies to which he belongs. ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

The difference between 'beneath the sea' and 'under the sea' [duplicate]

I've been trying to wrap my head around these two. So, here are the two relevant examples of usage (from Cambridge Dictionary and a YT video): When we use under, we mean that one thing is touching ...
1
vote
1answer
69 views

In/under one’s control

What’s the difference in meaning and/or usage between the phrases “A is in B’s control” and “A is under B’s control”? Are they somewhat interchangeable? My opinion is that the preposition ‘under’ has ...
1
vote
2answers
151 views

is it “in the face of” or “at the face of”

I am particularly interested in the following example: This theory has its most dedicated supporter in the face of Michael. This theory has its most dedicated supporter at the face of Michael....
2
votes
2answers
3k views

Be afraid of or be afraid to?

Would a pupil say: "I'm afraid of getting bad marks." or "I'm afraid to get bad marks."? What is the nuance introduced by OF and TO?
0
votes
2answers
321 views

Between/over yesterday and today

What kind of construction should I use to succinctly communicate to someone that I did a total of four tests in the time period of yesterday and today? If I just say: I did four tests yesterday and ...
0
votes
1answer
3k views

Expression: “application to” or “application on”

I am trying to derive a title to my thesis and I am not a native English speaker. So which one is the best form for expressing applications of methods: "Probabilistic approaches in sensitivity ...
0
votes
2answers
230 views

Can “on VERBing” be ambiguous?

SOURCE Oxford Learner's dictionary says, in its definition of on: 5 immediately after something On arriving home I discovered they had gone. There was a letter waiting for him on his return. ...
1
vote
1answer
82 views

What's the difference between these two sentences in English?

In the sentences below: 'It's only a suggestion.' 'That's only a suggestion.' I was told by most people that they could be used interchangeably, but I believe they exist for some reason ...
1
vote
1answer
55 views

Different expression for “in front of the computer“

A friend of mine asked me to read through his keywords for a presentation. He wanted to express that he sometimes eats in front of the computer. His sentence was: “I eat at the computer.“ Can we ...
3
votes
1answer
207 views

What are areas off a highway?

I've found the following passage a few days ago when I happened to read a report in DAWN, a Pakistani newspaper. The queries sought information about title to and acreage of the land being sold as ...
2
votes
2answers
16k views

Use of “in case of” sentence in past

I am wondering whether "in case of" with a verb in the past tense, like "decided," creates a correct expression. For example: ...in case of he decided to reply. Thank you
3
votes
3answers
684 views

how and when to use a preposition for the verb ' make it '?

Considering the use of this verb meaning in : 'manage to arrive' . How and when do I use the preposition 'to' ? Please take a look at the following sentences and explain which one makes sense in ...
1
vote
1answer
604 views

On (at) a moment(')s notice?

I have been searching for a while, and I haven't seen a good discussion of this phrase. It seems to me like the preposition is in question (I've heard it both ways), and the possessive is also in ...
0
votes
1answer
3k views

The way we chose/follow or the path we choose or…?

"the answer to this question will change depending on... [1] the way we chose to solve the same issue." [or-2] the way we follow to solve the same issue." [or-3] the path we choose to ...
2
votes
1answer
107 views

Is to use 'of' meaning 'from' old-fashioned?

Is there any difference in tone between the two expressions? May I ask you a big favor? May I ask a big favor of you? Is it right that there is a rule to say in this way? Or is it just the ...
1
vote
1answer
182 views

Meaning of pop off

1.Pop off rounds a tree 2.pop off rounds at a tree I think meaning of *pop off means also *fire So above two sentences is my matter that crossing out the preposition of *at or remain it? Or either ...
1
vote
1answer
558 views

the people who {founded / had founded} the city over 400 years ago

I wore the dress I bought yesterday. Both verbs are in the past simple (same sequence of time). But if I bought the dress 3 years ago, would it be possible to write this: I wore the dress I had ...
22
votes
6answers
102k views

Difference between “in time” and “on time”

I have an appointment at 8 and I arrive there at 7:55, is it "on time" or "in time"? What about "the nick of time"?