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1answer
32 views

Is it right to say “You are waiting me on a mistake”

If there's some person (e.g., in your work space) who is waiting on you to make a mistake then to give you a warning or something, is it right to tell him: "You're waiting me on a mistake"? How ...
0
votes
0answers
59 views

Cambridge English Certification

I'm not sure if this is the right place to post a question like the following (and if not, I'd be happy to be redirected to a better one, maybe still on StackExchange), but since I have no other ideas,...
1
vote
2answers
70 views

“I hope” vs “I want”

One says from bottom of his heart, I don't want him to be humiliated because of me. I hope that he will not be humiliated because of me. Until this day, I thought "I don't want" makes more ...
2
votes
2answers
73 views

What expressions are used to mean “people who usually meet to consume alcohol together”?

In my home language in a very informal situation the English term TABLE MATE is used for a group of people who get together usually to consume alcohol. Is this expression in use in English? Or else ...
0
votes
2answers
142 views

“Greetings” as a greeting

In one of the episodes of Rick and Morty, The Ricks Must Be Crazy, Rick says "Greetings" to a crowd. It's not the first time I hear this expression, which seems to be used as a greeting. What's the ...
0
votes
3answers
472 views

The meaning difference between “on course” and “on track”

I imagine the noun "course" implies a smooth and well-maintained road but the noun "track" implies a rough road and not really maintained. But some dictionary says "on course" and "on track" both are ...
0
votes
1answer
116 views

The usage of the word “clearly”!

Can I say "good job. You describe the event very clearly"? I am not sure I can use the word clearly like this. However, it sounds okay to me! Thanks in advance
2
votes
1answer
145 views

Is “When to use which” Correct ?

Let's assume we have n methods of doing X, When i ask "When to use which ?" i expect the answer to be something like : "Use A when ... , Use B when ..." By asking this question I want to ask "When ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

Usage of “on cloud nine”?

I heard "I'm on cloud nine" in a song and realized it was an expression by reading it somewhere else. I am learning English for years but I never heard of that before. I found informations about the ...
2
votes
1answer
179 views

Interpretation of: “I discussed the subject of the paper with someone”

Suppose, I've written a paper "On Blue Cats" and told somebody that "I discussed the subject of the paper with Brown". How will this be understood? Will it mean that We discussed blue cats: their ...
-2
votes
2answers
103 views

Expression in context : asking and reacting [closed]

How to ask question politely and how to respond in the following context : Context 1 If I want to ask how much he/she earns salary politely How much salary you'r provided ? Or How much salary you ...
9
votes
3answers
63k views

“Here you are & Here you go”

When somebody asks you for something and you give it to them, which expression is correct or more common? eg., My little sister plays with toys and she wants to give one of her toys to me. So what ...
1
vote
1answer
619 views

Is “ just as good of a” a sufficiently legitimate expression to be used in academical writing?

Say, "sin(x) is just as good of a smooth function as exp(x)"
2
votes
2answers
1k views

How to use the expression “throw oneself into something”

I have recently learned the expression "throw oneself into something", but I am kind of confused about how to use it in daily conversation. Could anyone explain me this, with some examples? For ...
0
votes
1answer
7k views

Is the usage of “case in point” correct in this sentence?

In the following sentences: This is a highly popular style among beginners. The case in point here is the practice of indenting continuation lines at the same level of the first argument in a ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Meaning of expression “They are calling for rain”

Whenever the radio/TV weather forecasters predict any kind of rainy weather, you hear people, when chatting or making small talk with friends and/or family: "They are calling for rain." Is this ...
2
votes
2answers
867 views

How acceptable is it to use “it's like” (or just “like”) as a filler word?

I am not a native English speaker myself but I am very annoyed by the fact that a lot of people these days, native and also non-native English speakers, are continuously using the expression "it's ...