Questions tagged [expressions]

This tag is for questions which a dictionary cannot answer asking the meaning of a particular expression.

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Is this mathematical explanation of “except” and “other than” right?

This question is derived from this one. Assume "not including" and "including" have two mutually exclusive meanings. It is impossible "not including" and "including" at the same time. The Oxford ...
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1answer
24 views

Which pair is exchangeable, “besides” and “aside from” or “except for” and “aside from”?

This is one of the examples from cambridge dict. Do you play any other sports besides basketball? Oxford dict consider "besides", "except for" and "aside from" are synonyms. To simplify the ...
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2answers
45 views

Are “right now” and “currently” exchangeably here?

Chapter 2 of the book "C++ Primer Plus, 6th Edition by Stephen Prata (2012)" says Right now the main point to remember is that C++ syntax requires you to begin the definition of the main() function ...
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35 views

Is “there also are” a grammatical and idiomatic expression?

Consider this sentence - Besides square brackets, there are double quotation, braces, and so on. Is it a grammatical and idiomatic expression to say as follow? Besides square brackets, ...
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1answer
34 views

When Alice has got a cold, we could say “Alice is sick”, “Alice feels ill”, or some other expressions?

cambridge gives this meaning of ill not feeling well, or suffering from a disease and this meaning of sick physically or mentally ill; not well or healthy So, when someone, say Alice, has got ...
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32 views

What do we use when we mean “so on” in a formal essay?

For example: There are some alternatives for your bed frames, kitchen tables,...that aren't necessarily made of solid wood, such as artificial wood, wood plus plastic, iron, etc.
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About parenthetical expressions, is the sentence grammartically correct?

This novel method has significantly improved the research period from one year in previous attempts, due to a lack of observatory data, to the longest year with reliable documentary data, 100 ...
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1answer
13 views

Does “**societies**” here mean “groups of people” or “registered organizations”?

This page says In the decades since the 1960s, ACM, along with leading professional and scientific computing societies, has endeavored to tailor curriculum recommendations to the rapidly changing ...
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1answer
20 views

Which one is more appropriate, “only loves baseball” or “loves only baseball”?

I asked a question just now. I am not sure if this sentence is grammatical and idiomatic. the guy only loves baseball in the scope of available options. Is this case, which one is more ...
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1answer
16 views

Is “have gone” identical to “have been” in some cases, such as being used to describe some status?

recently, SO pushed this blog everywhere, which says (expression_1) These options have gone untouched for a long time it seems that this expression could be rewritten as (expression_2) These ...
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2answers
27 views

Meaning of “Solution is all but trivial”

This is another example of how to use the phrase: "Something is all but Something" ... I have seen some examples of using this phrase as "almost completely", so, that would mean the solution is very ...
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33 views

“we are only given something” or “we are given only something”?

chapter 1 of the book "Machine Learning - A Probabilistic Perspective" says The second main type of machine learning is the descriptive or unsupervised learning approach. Here we are only given ...
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What is the difference between “… are produced by …” and “… are those that would be produced by …”?

The doc says The comprehension consists of a single expression followed by at least one for clause and zero or more for or if clauses. In this case, the elements of the new container are those that ...
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1answer
35 views

Is “get a better understanding about some concept/mechanism” a grammatical, idiomatic and clear expression?

I asked a question just now. I am trying to get a better understanding about this procedure of Python code to be generated. similarly people may say these get a better understanding about ...
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2answers
32 views

Is it reasonable to say “aside from” means a set does not include something

Oxford dictionary gives this example sentence about "aside from". A full scale search was launched and thankfully she was found unharmed, aside from suffering from the cold. Is it reasonable to ...
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1answer
67 views

In English speaking, how does one correct a misspoken word?

What English expression is used to immediately correct a misspoken word in English speaking? The cube root of 1331 is, 12; _____, 11. I'm thinking of these, but I have no idea which one would be ...
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1answer
31 views

“a right way” or “in a right way”?

I heard a lot people omit the "in" while saying "in a right way". for example if a kid play with a knife, someone would told him/her "you are not using the knife a right way" is it grammatical and ...
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“Literally” Vs “In the true sense of the word”

The Cambridge and other dictionaries say that "literally" can be used as an emphasis on something. But there is another term: "in the true sense of the word", which to mea has a quite similar meaning ...
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1answer
30 views

An idiom to mean: to accept / expand someone's statements in formal speech

Let's assume you and someone else (say: Dr. Adam) are giving speech in a meeting. Dr. Adam says something and after his remarks and statements, you'd like to say: I accept Dr. Adam's statements ...
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1answer
17 views

When talking about `apply for` certain operators, `apply to` is more appropriate, is my understanding right?

this doc says Some additional rules apply for certain operators (e.g., a string as a left argument to the ‘%’ operator). Extensions must define their own conversion behavior. per cambridge, when ...
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Is the expression “does any of” grammatical, idiomatic and clear?

I asked a question just now. Does any of Python, Java, bash, lua use statement separator? (Python, Java, bash, lua are programming/script language.) Is the expression "does any of ... do" ...
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1answer
27 views

Does 'getting ages' idiomatically sound natural?

We're usually taught (in Korea) to say getting old to describe that something/someone is aging, but I found out this can sound unnecessarily exaggerated as if it's running out of its lifespan. To tone ...
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1answer
81 views

What exactly the expression “make an argument” means?

I wonder what exactly the expression "make an argument" means on this phrase: "Machiavelli makes the argument that in a strictly military sense a fortress is invariably a mistake." I'm not sure if it ...
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1answer
18 views

Wordchoice: to barbecue something or to have a barbecue

I've been wondering whether there is a distinction between to barbecue sth. and to have a barbecue I suppose to barbecue something is the act of barbecuing (grilling) food. and having a barbecue ...
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3answers
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Argumentative Text - Linking expressions for advantages and disadvantages

In an argumentative text/essay what linking expressions can be used to introduce the pros and cons of the essay topic/object/theme, after a short introduction? For example, if I'm writing an ...
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162 views

From + noun + on / onward / forward / forth / ahead

Which word would we use if we were going to use a "specific time" or "specific place" instead of the noun? How would you fill the blanks bellow? 1)From tonight (................) . (on / onward / ...
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1answer
2k views

Which expression is correct: 'for working with' or 'to work with'

For me it seems that in the following case expression seems not to be fitting, I think the second example is shorter, simpler and may even be more correct. dugite - Elegant bindings for working with ...
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1answer
814 views

Meaning of “You say” as in “-Sorry I can't party I'm busy -You say you're busy”

I'm wondering the following conversations, extracted mostly from a comedic video at the following timestamps links: a,In this one it says you walk, no you say, but it's similar concept,c. The phrases ...
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American Equivalent for “roll on something”

Roll on something As you perhaps know, Britons tend to use this term to imply how much they like something happen and when they wish a specific time or event would come more quickly. Example: ...
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42 views

A proverb / saying that says: keep away from people because they have potential to harm you

I am looking for a derogatory proverb including a negative approach toward social associations that conveys the meassage that it would be better to stay away from most of the people! Because many of ...
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2answers
11k views

How to use raison d'etre?

I would like to use the expression "raison d'etre" in my writing. What I would like to express is a lack of thinking or mental activity when someone doesn't question a process — they just follow ...
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1answer
29 views

“should I” or “do I need to”? which one is more appropriate?

I asked a question on this post should I put ... at the end? in case someone is not familiar to sequence-of-sets, this could be viewed as a punctuation at the end of a sentence (bad analogy). ...
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1answer
129 views

The usage of the word “clearly”!

Can I say "good job. You describe the event very clearly"? I am not sure I can use the word clearly like this. However, it sounds okay to me! Thanks in advance
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A proverb to imply that “you often love those who are far from you”

I am looking for a proverb or a fixed expression in current English (not an archaic and as a result far from people's literary knowledge) which encapsulates the following message: When people we ...
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1answer
12 views

“Anther link is `to` quora”, is this expression grammatical and idiomatic?

this question comes from this post, where I asked I googled "uniform prior" and got a link to Prior probability, which uses the term without an explanation or a definition. Anther link is to ...
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1answer
171 views

idiom or expression for a spiteful/vengeful person

I am looking for an idiom or expression to describe a spiteful and vindictive person; a type of person who tends to hold a grudge against their offenders for a long time, being unable to forget past ...
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3answers
61 views

“there are no special names for each city”

I got this question: What names are most common in your hometown? My answer: There are traditional names like "Jake", "Jacob" and "Holmes", but they are used across the whole country, and there ...
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1answer
33 views

“square of a” or “squared a”, which one is more idiomatic in the context of academic, such as a textbook?

"square of a" is equal to the product of a and itself. to refer to this, "square of a" or "squared a", which one is more idiomatic in the context of academic, such as a textbook?
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1answer
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An idiom for “as far as it is related to me,…”

Scenario #1: Let's suppose a top student is going to give a speech at school and would like to express his gratitude to his teacher for all his efforts in one educational year. I was wondering how he ...
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1answer
14 views

Which one is correct understanding about this sentence? The .. data are generated by a … over datasets called the data generating process

the deep learning book says The train and test data are generated by a probability distribution over datasets called the data generating process here are 2 understandings: [The train and test ...
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2answers
23 views

Is it reasonable to simplify “Checking for existing SSH keys” to “Check existing SSH keys”?

I am learning this post, whose title is "Checking for existing SSH keys". Checking for existing SSH keys Before you generate an SSH key, you can check to see if you have any existing SSH keys. ...
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1answer
221 views

what is the correct expression of the two below?

Is is right to say "I have a pen" or "I am having a pen" ? I keep hearing people using the latter.
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2answers
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What does “This is all” mean in this particular case?

This post says This is all in the context of the data-generating distribution (or underlying distribution of the data). You can check another answer I made for more details on this. Remove the "in ...
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3answers
47 views

“didnt have the phone to myself yesterday” it it correct?

"I didn't have the phone to myself yesterday" Is that a correct sentence and a way of telling someone that your phone was not with you yesterday and that is why you couldn't reply
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1answer
25 views

Can someone help to understand this? “The speedup of a program, coming from …, was derived to be principally limited by …”

This post says The speedup of a program, coming from using multiple processors in parallel computing, was derived to be ( maybe to a surprise of audience ) principally limited by the very fraction ...
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1answer
34 views

“what are you in the mood of today” is it correct?

"what are you in the mood of today" is that a correct way of asking someone what they wanna do (moodwise) i know " what do you feel like doing " is more common way but just wanna know whether the ...
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26 views

Grate on someone's ears / nerves

What does the sentence below mean? His voice grates on my ears. His voice grates on my nerves. Please have a look on Longman's definition below: To grate on (to annoy someone):  - Mr ...
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Use of “I feel like it.” [duplicate]

Does "I feel like it/that" has exactly the same meaning as "I want to do it/that"? If it doesn't, what could be the difference between these two?
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1answer
33 views

“The professor does the attendance in his room” is grammatically correct?

I know that attendance for students means "being present in the class". How can I say that the professor answers the doubts questions in his room, for example Mondays between 4 and 5 pm? Could it be ...
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2answers
550 views

Question about expression “Referring to”

I have a question about the usage of "referring to". Let's assume that you are in a meeting and you are giving a presentation. You have to explain about a couple of things that are in the table chart ...