Questions tagged [expressions]

This tag is for questions which a dictionary cannot answer asking the meaning of a particular expression.

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1answer
48 views

Is “get a better understanding about some concept/mechanism” a grammatical, idiomatic and clear expression?

I asked a question just now. I am trying to get a better understanding about this procedure of Python code to be generated. similarly people may say these get a better understanding about ...
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3answers
182 views

How are you finding [something]?

I have read the expression "How are you finding [something] ?" (= What are you thinking of [something] ?) for the first time today. Is it used only/mostly in UK?
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9answers
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English equivalent of “garam” (warming) food?

I want to know how we say in English when we want to say that almonds or other dry fruits are "hot" for our body. I am an Indian, and in India, we use the word garam which literally means hot in ...
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1answer
87 views

Don't (verb)… (like) OR (unlike) I did

Say my intention is to say "I did this bad things to her, but you shouldn't do it": Don't do that mean thing to her like how I did. Don't do that mean thing to her unlike how I did. This ...
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1answer
71 views

The use of a superlative in the form “one smart of a cat”

I'd like to write in a translation a kind of superlative like "he was one smart of a cat" to avoid writing "he was one hell of a smart cat". Is it grammatically correct? Do you have any better ...
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31 views

“To be on the same page”

As you are fully aware, the using this idiom within the construction below: I don't think we are on the same page. means: I don't think we understand each other. This idiom on the other hand has ...
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2answers
55 views

Apologizing informally

Is it appropriate to say 'Sorry for making this hard for you'? Some context: We tried to set up a time to meet but we have conflicting schedules so we decided to meet later at night.
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3answers
12k views

a morning greeting: is it “morning”, “g'morning” or neither?

Not a native English speaker and poor at distinguishing shortened expressions, I am not sure if native English speakers indeed say "Morning", or "G'morning", in addition to the formal expression "GOOD ...
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3answers
32k views

“I would be very happy if I could have…” Is this natural sentence with manners?

I would be very happy if I could have such an opportunity to see you in person, so please let me know whenever (if?) you will have a chance to visit this area. Is this natural sentence with manners? ...
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1answer
25 views

How to write about this kind of situation?

I've tried hard for my physical test to be able to pass every items, Unfortunately I had a bad performance and in conquence, very bad results in my physical examinations, now I have to say about ...
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1answer
20 views

A query about closing line in mails

I generally use this sentence at the end my email before signature: 'Please let me know in case of any queries.' Is this phrase correct to use for closing a mail?
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1answer
32 views

Is it a right situation to use the phrase?

"We apologize for any inconvenience you experienced" Can I use the phrase when I am eager to apologize for an inaccuracy in documents?
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1answer
1k views

Does “I haven't got to do it yet” imply not completing sth but having enough time to make it?

I wanted to express a similar meaning to the one of this sentence: I haven't get it done yet, but at the same time, I wanted to emphasise that I had enough time, but was, say, too lazy to complete ...
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2answers
21 views

Is “have gone” identical to “have been” in some cases, such as being used to describe some status?

recently, SO pushed this blog everywhere, which says (expression_1) These options have gone untouched for a long time it seems that this expression could be rewritten as (expression_2) These ...
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1answer
26 views

What expression fits the best for the intended meaning?

I'm looking for an expression that would mean someone takes control over someone else, like in a bad relationship, when someone takes a dominant posture in spite of the other person. Google would ...
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2answers
25 views

Is there some prepostion required between “a wall” and “16 inches on center” in a little bit normal written english

It sound like the tutorial is saying today I'm going to show you how to frame a wall 16 inches on center ... I am awar of what he said, which is a clear expression in everyday speech. The ...
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1answer
24 views

(Expression) Bag of bones / Sack of bones / Bones sack

Are all of these expressions correct ? For rhyming purposes I was planning to use the third one, but I'm not sure it is correct because I've never seen that formulation : 1 - Bag of bones 2 - ...
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1answer
7 views

What does “we’re it” mean in this context?

As their common name implies, house crows (Corvus splendens) stick pretty closely to people. So much so that there are no known populations living independently of us. You might say that, in so ...
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1answer
11 views

From-time-to-time vs. From time to time

I used to use from time to time but I got recently corrected to use from-time-to-time (actually it's from time-to-time but I think both are effectively the same). It seems like from-time-to-time is ...
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1answer
1k views

Should I use “at every iteration” or “in every iteration”?

Which one is correct "at every/each iteration" or "in every/each iteration"? I also have this confusion when using "step" instead of "iteration". More specifically, should I use "at each step" or "in ...
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0answers
24 views

How to express “Please don't hold or keep the milk or water in your mouth, swallow it”?

Sometimes, my little child takes a sip of water or milk & then he keeps or holds the sip in his mouth without swallowing it. Is it idiomatic to say "Please don't hold or keep the milk or water in ...
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1answer
19 views

“He is in the horizontal position”, “supine”, which expression is more clear and idiomatic?

This post is derived from this one. Consider the guy pointed out by red circle the following image (img_1), which expression in the following is more clear and idiomatic? He is in the horizontal ...
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1answer
124 views

Brain is equally important as brawn in sports

Any idioms/expressions/phrases which conveys the same idea in the title? Example: In badminton, it's not just how fast or hard you hit the shuttle but you also need to play with smartness to defeat ...
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2answers
60 views

Is this a correct expression in English?

Once, my friend and I wanted to go to some place, so we took a tram (train) to reach this place but we missed our destination twice, forward and backward, because we were busy talking to each ...
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1answer
33 views

“My room looks like as follow” or “My room looks like the following”

I asked a question in another post, where I uploaded an image to demonstrate what my room and said My room looks like as follow with concrete walls and I am considering if both expression are ...
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46 views

Meaning of the idiomatic “biscuits and gravy”

In the movie Line of Duty (about 45:30 in), a guy huge gets a weight thrown at him in a gym. Surprisingly not very bothered nor hurt, he says: "Biscuits and gravy, bitch!" and then starts to fight ...
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What is a term for someone who either politely rejects an offer or doesn't make use of something that has been offered to him?

E.g. a very rich and fortunate person offers you to use any amount of his wealth, however, either by or without saying, you will never want to use that person's money.
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60 views

How to apologize

"I apologize for not have spoken to you in person yet." "I apologize for not speaking to you in person yet." Basically, I’m trying to say: "I’m sorry I haven't had the time to speak to you ...
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1answer
32 views

Does “be subject to” indicate a complaint and a suggestion?

This is a part of the paper "THE PERCEPTRON: A PROBABILISTIC MODEL FOR INFORMATION STORAGE AND ORGANIZATION IN THE BRAIN" The first of these questions is in the province of sensory physiology, and ...
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24 views

“Not want to hurt” synonyms

I want to express that people act in a way that they do 'not want to hurt/harm' a company. However, I wonder if there is another way to express it without a reference to physical suffering. As people ...
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1answer
19 views

Are there any grammatical errors in the statement “As are you.”?

If someone compliments you, and you want to respond with the same compliment, Is it grammatically incorrect to say “As are you my friend."
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1answer
16 views

A sarcastic expression

When something is obvious and the other person didn’t notice a long time and then lately realised, for i.e someone come up and say I know I’ve broken your heart In my mother language we go and say “...
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1answer
42 views

Concrete examples to supplement(s) when talk about some operation or explanation

I am confused with the usage of the word supplement. A similar usage might be a 16-page advertising supplement where it means an additional part of a book, newspaper, report etc Following is ...
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1answer
5k views

How was your weekend?

It was okay, not best. Have formed this by translating from language x to English. How to say that is a neat way?
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1answer
2k views

Which expression is correct: 'for working with' or 'to work with'

For me it seems that in the following case expression seems not to be fitting, I think the second example is shorter, simpler and may even be more correct. dugite - Elegant bindings for working with ...
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0answers
31 views

Other ways to say “What's happening?”

Can you suggest similar expressions to "what's happening"? The first that came up to me are: What's going on? What's up? I am learning English, I am in a small country in Europe. I am ...
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0answers
46 views

How to say “short/little time is left”?

What is the proper way to say that very little/short time is left for something? For example, when there are very few days left before the exams start. I don't want to mention days, but time, in my ...
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1answer
21 views

Educators' slang: “taking people from where they are”

Imagine somebody organising an educational event (e.g. a conference) and trying to set up the programme in a way that everybody attending is being "taken from where they are", meaning: the programme ...
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1answer
42 views

What is the difference between 1.differentiate and 2.distinguish

Both words are verb transitive.They are of the same meaning.There are many words in dictionary and thesaurus which words are differentiating in their usage. If we use other words of the dictionary ...
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3answers
105 views

Argumentative Text - Linking expressions for advantages and disadvantages

In an argumentative text/essay what linking expressions can be used to introduce the pros and cons of the essay topic/object/theme, after a short introduction? For example, if I'm writing an ...
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1answer
56 views

“we are only given something” or “we are given only something”?

chapter 1 of the book "Machine Learning - A Probabilistic Perspective" says The second main type of machine learning is the descriptive or unsupervised learning approach. Here we are only given ...
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2answers
57 views

Meaning of “Solution is all but trivial”

This is another example of how to use the phrase: "Something is all but Something" ... I have seen some examples of using this phrase as "almost completely", so, that would mean the solution is very ...
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1answer
1k views

Meaning of “You say” as in “-Sorry I can't party I'm busy -You say you're busy”

I'm wondering the following conversations, extracted mostly from a comedic video at the following timestamps links: a,In this one it says you walk, no you say, but it's similar concept,c. The phrases ...
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Describing the past events with proper tense choice

I want to describe a past incident. Like, a few months ago I faced a bike accident. I tell the story to one of my friends. I describe the story in the past tense. Like, I wanted to buy groceries. ...
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1answer
111 views

What exactly the expression “make an argument” means?

I wonder what exactly the expression "make an argument" means on this phrase: "Machiavelli makes the argument that in a strictly military sense a fortress is invariably a mistake." I'm not sure if it ...
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2answers
22 views

Everybody's gotta learn sometime

https://youtu.be/Xe5LQHCWZRM "Everybody's gotta learn somtime" (As I know, " 's " is a contraction of 'has' in this case) I am confused about what 'has got to' means in this lyrics. Which of the ...
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1answer
213 views

idiom or expression for a spiteful/vengeful person

I am looking for an idiom or expression to describe a spiteful and vindictive person; a type of person who tends to hold a grudge against their offenders for a long time, being unable to forget past ...
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1answer
148 views

The usage of the word “clearly”!

Can I say "good job. You describe the event very clearly"? I am not sure I can use the word clearly like this. However, it sounds okay to me! Thanks in advance
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1answer
33 views

“It was reported that..”, which is closer to this idiom: rumor or a fact?

I'm translating the 'Spectre (security vulnerability)' Wikipedia article to my mother tongue, and it contains a sentence like below; It was reported that Intel shared news of the Meltdown and ...
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2answers
699 views

Question about expression “Referring to”

I have a question about the usage of "referring to". Let's assume that you are in a meeting and you are giving a presentation. You have to explain about a couple of things that are in the table chart ...

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