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Questions tagged [formal-language]

is for questions about whether a word or phrase is appropriate in a formal context or that are requesting a word or phrase for use in a formal context.

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What is the proper way to use articles in formula annotations?

English is not my native language. Recently I ran into a problem while writing a scientific paper. It seems like different authors use a/the articles in formula annotations differently, and I can't ...
nomad's user avatar
  • 11
2 votes
1 answer
26 views

Is 'teach a school' in this context correct?

I am reading A woman makes a plan: advice for a lifetime of adventure, beauty, and success by Maye Musk, but I've never seen the use of 'teach' in 'teaching this modeling school' in this context: “...
Lerner Zhang's user avatar
  • 3,481
0 votes
1 answer
35 views

Why are some verbs in the present tense, while others are in the past tense, at the beggining of bullet points in this resume?

The following is a part of a sample resume from an article on Coursera. My qeustion is, why are some verbs in the present tense, while others are in the past tense, at the beggining of bullet points?: ...
catwith's user avatar
  • 1,048
1 vote
0 answers
35 views

Formality in comparative structures

In addition, dramatic differences are not seen in the amount of leisure time men and women expended during the period examined, but men tended to use more time for this than women. In addition, ...
Ken Adams's user avatar
  • 925
0 votes
0 answers
37 views

How to write the name of a foreign Master's degree from a non-English speaking country on a resume?

What is the formal way of writing the name of a Master's degree from a different country on a resume? I am confused about the following options: Master’s in Exploration Informatique des Données et ...
Louardi Brahim's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
78 views

Is it 'fitted with' or 'fit with'? [closed]

Is it 'fit with' or 'fitted with'? In: A stand fitted with a protractor
The Amateur Coder's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
51 views

What's the best way to avoid repeating the name of the subject in a formal letter?

What's the best way to avoid repeating the name of the subject in the letter? Assuming that I need to refer to the same person in a formal letter multiple times, what's the formal way to do so? For ...
Virtuous Legend's user avatar
8 votes
2 answers
1k views

Should I use 'denote' or 'be'? 'Let A denote/be a vertex cover…'

I struggled to understand where "denote" is better than "be". For example: Let A denote a vertex cover of the graph. or Let A be a vertex cover of the graph.
shani's user avatar
  • 83
0 votes
1 answer
47 views

Valediction for a team / group

I am writing a letter starting with 'Dear recruiting team,' (multiple recipients, not addressed by name). Is 'Yours faithfully' the proper valediction for ending this letter? Edit: It is for a British ...
Olaf's user avatar
  • 105
3 votes
2 answers
1k views

Should the suffix "III" be included in the salutation to a senator

The rule for the salutation in a letter to a senator is: Dear Senator (Surname) Should the Surname include their suffix, specifically "III" as in 'the third'. For a Senator Rober Smith III, ...
TechWriterTen's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
56 views

What does the phrase "take this approach to" mean in English?

According to many books and articles, New England's leaders established the basic themes and preoccupations of an unfolding, dominant Puritan tradition in American intellectual life. To take this ...
jack S's user avatar
  • 39
0 votes
1 answer
53 views

Is 'Yours sincerely,' part of a sentence?

I came across this page by the BBC on how to write a formal business letter. Here they end the letter by saying: Yours sincerely (space for signature) James Smellsnice Sales Manager. Notice how they ...
Olaf's user avatar
  • 105
1 vote
1 answer
122 views

Does this sound rude? How could I have said it better?

Me: Good afternoon, ma'am Josie. Just letting you know I'm ready for the interview. Could you please let me know if it will still happen this afternoon? Thank you. Josie: Hello. You were scheduled for ...
alex1923's user avatar
6 votes
3 answers
1k views

In contexts like 'this study can give English learners...', is 'can' idiomatic or should 'will' be used?

In Chinese, we use ‘能’, meaning 'can / could' very often to express euphemistically and avoid 'absolute'. But I read a thesis written by a Chinese, goes that: this study can give English learners ...
Narox's user avatar
  • 311
0 votes
1 answer
65 views

alternative for "but not" in formal language [closed]

I am looking for an alternative for the expression "but not" in the sentence: "the parameters satisfies the condition A, but not the condition B." It is a sentence that will be ...
Renato Fernandes's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
45 views

Reply to recepient who changed the tone fo the email

I wrote a work-related formal email to somebody and they replied back informally. Should my next reply match their informal tone (changing from my original Dear Name to Hi etc) or should I continue ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
22 views

All these books may be had of any bookseller.('be had')

All these books may be had of any bookseller. I came across the above sentence, which I discovered was taken from the Oxford English Dictionary, and thought that 'be had' would rarely or never be ...
gomadeng's user avatar
  • 4,306
0 votes
1 answer
37 views

Is this paragraph informal conversation or in writing and formal format?

I just started learning English and I listen to podcasts like this. My question is that the following paragraph is an informal conversation or in writing and formal format: In 1436 in Germany, ...
Mehdi Rahimi's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
40 views

The word "InnerTube" in a different context

I´m translating a subtitle of a movie but I have not understood this sentence: " The things these kids post out on them InnerTube, ohhh boy I do not get that" What is the meaning of "...
Rogerio Sarmento's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
475 views

Using "be going to" in formal writing

This video says (at 1:07) we cannot use "be going to" to describe future plans in a formal writing because its informal. (I have already asked another question about an other claim of this ...
alireza's user avatar
  • 1,060
0 votes
1 answer
97 views

Is using "did that" instead of "did so" a good choice in formal writing?

According to the answer to this question, saying "did so" is not a good choice in formal writing. Does replacing it to "did that" make it appropriate for a formal writing? For ...
alireza's user avatar
  • 1,060
2 votes
3 answers
149 views

Is 'legitimately' informal when it means really?

In many videos, the streamers there use the word 'legitly' or 'legitimately' to mean very or really. For examples, the Anime Man says, I legitimately thought, the first time i saw this article, I ...
Michael's user avatar
  • 3,428
0 votes
0 answers
85 views

Should we use "this" or "that" here

I feel a little sick. That/This is why I'm going home early. Should we use "that" or "this" here? Or are they both grammatically correct?
ihateithere's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
27 views

Are these "not only...but..."structures right or wrong and why?

I have been taught that the same parts of speech should be used in "not only..but...". However, Vanessa used these examples and I was puzzled. Example 1. It is not only difficult to find a ...
cathy zhang's user avatar
0 votes
4 answers
139 views

Which one of the sentence is grammatically correct?

1: They would be happy if the road 'is not' bifurcated. 2: They would be happy if the road 'does not get' bifurcated. I am really confused with the use of 'is not' and 'does not get'. Are the above ...
jai durga's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
16 views

How do I treat the second part of "have either no" construction?

Consider the following sentence structure: If {some subject} has either no {one thing} or {another thing} then ... Does the no part of has either no apply to the {another thing} here? I.e. does it ...
The Dreams Wind's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
275 views

How to indicate someone stood in for someone else on meeting minutes?

We have person A who normally takes notes. Person A was sick, now Person B did the notes. Would it make sense as follows in the meeting minutes? Secretary: Person A, but stand-in Person B
PalimPalim's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
51 views

Can a point be in the future without being "of time"?

I wrote the following. We will revise it at some point in the future. It's obvious, unambiguous and grammatically correct. However, I can't shake off the sensation that it's nonsensical because a ...
Konrad Viltersten's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
427 views

What are more formal words/phrases for "pass sth on to sb" and "get back to someone"?

In the following sentence, I feel that the phrases "pass on to" and "get back to" are rather informal. Am I right about this, and, if so, what are more formal expressions I could ...
Helen's user avatar
  • 1,724
0 votes
1 answer
31 views

Is "I think leaving for the USA when I'm 20" correct? [closed]

I'm new here. I was taking quizzes because I'm having an exam tomorrow and once in a while I find something I had no idea about, such as this specific case. I thought that the only accepted forms were ...
Luca's user avatar
  • 21
0 votes
2 answers
7k views

How to reply to someone who introduced himself [closed]

How can I reply when I chat with a new person and he introduced himself and I want to show that I'm pleased to know him but in formal way
Jan 86's user avatar
  • 21
0 votes
1 answer
62 views

"translator of" or "Translator for"

Is "English translator of this company" correct or "English translator for this company"? I want to introduce my job somewhere and the position I work in it and I don't know which ...
skyzera's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
22 views

Please explain the meaning of this phrase

Below sentences is confusingly structured. It is not uncommon for the person being sexually assaulted to have no physical injuries or signs of their assault. Is the meaning that it is common for ...
user311438's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
470 views

Can you use "please" at the end of a question when you request information?

In a previous question, people have noted one can use "please" at the end of questions which serve as a request but not others. However, what about questions which request information? For ...
Probably's user avatar
  • 1,589
0 votes
1 answer
3k views

What's more natural - "when" or "what" time would be convenient to meet today?

Does it sound natural to ask in an email: Could you please let me know what time and where would be convenient for you to meet today? I thought it is more appropriate to use "when" if I ...
Firas's user avatar
  • 1
1 vote
2 answers
178 views

"I have got to sing" or "I have gotten to sing"

I know that normally in American English we use "gotten" after has/have but in this type of construction, do Americans say "got" or "gotten"? As in "I have got to ...
Bilal Zafar's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
2k views

Is it correct/natural to say "Can you confirm receipt of the email?"

What is the short formal wording to say "Can you confirm you have received the email?/Did you get the email?" I thought something like "Can you confirm receipt of the email?" is it ...
Real Dreams's user avatar
  • 2,225
0 votes
1 answer
739 views

Is "happy with ..." formal?

Can I use the following sentence in an email? Is "happy with" formal? if not what are the alternative phrases? "My supervisor is happy with the attached version of the contract" ...
MHSN's user avatar
  • 1
1 vote
1 answer
110 views

Inquiry vs Enquiry what's the difference?

Is there a difference between the two words Inquiry and Enquiry when being used in formal writing as the two have been used alternatively in literature. And if not which one should be preferred in ...
Tayyab's user avatar
  • 171
3 votes
3 answers
1k views

Is "steer clear of" formal or informal?

In the following text, I need a formal language. Is "steer clear of" appropriately used with an awareness of style? Nature make a favourable impression on people. However, some people have ...
a.toraby's user avatar
  • 1,912
9 votes
5 answers
2k views

Does saying "Keep it up" put me in an authoritative position?

As a way of congratulating someone on starting a new project, I recently said "Keep it up". The other person said that "keep it up" isn't a phrase one would use outside of work and ...
nocomment's user avatar
  • 199
1 vote
1 answer
38 views

Does including 'to be' after linking verbs sounds informal?

Here I provide the excerpt I took from Advanced Grammar In Use: Before a noun we include to be when the noun tells us what the subject is, but often leave it out when we give our opinion of the ...
user516076's user avatar
  • 5,012
0 votes
1 answer
156 views

Is it okay to ommit personal pronouns in such situations?

I'm wondering if it's considered casual and natural to start sentences without the pronoun, or if a native English speaker would find that odd and feel that I'm either being way too casual or that I'm ...
Vendrameto's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
32 views

sentence falls apart when I add a second example

I wrote some programs in Python that basically reduced lead times and labour costs. I am having difficulty in expressing the whole idea; it's becoming too wordy and hard to follow. Let's start with a ...
AIQ's user avatar
  • 10k
0 votes
3 answers
606 views

"respectively"—should only be used if your sentence would be unclear without it?

Should we use in academic writing the word "respectively" for the following case: Consider circles 1 and 2. These circles have radii r1 and r2, respectively. Maybe because it is obvious ...
Ben's user avatar
  • 419
1 vote
1 answer
27 views

"or" between items

Which option is the proper in academic writing for "or" items (apples/pears/oranges): I am going to eat red apples or yellow pears or green oranges. I am going to eat red apples, or yellow ...
Ben's user avatar
  • 419
1 vote
1 answer
103 views

Should "as" be dropped in "Incredible lock picking skills as demonstrated by ..."? Why or why not?

I know that "as demonstrated by" is correct usage here: I have incredible lock picking skills as demonstrated by abc and xyz. In the above sentence, dropping "as" would be ...
AIQ's user avatar
  • 10k
0 votes
3 answers
108 views

Using a comma instead of "and" in "A and B are the objects that are part of the equation."

It is proper to use "," between A and B A, B are the objects that are part of the equation. instead of "and" A and B are the objects that are part of the equation. in formal ...
Ben's user avatar
  • 419
1 vote
1 answer
137 views

Is the usage of "over" in the meaning of "finished" formal?

Is the usage of "over" in the meaning of "finish" like the below sentence formal? My project will be over by 2022.
alireza's user avatar
  • 1,060
0 votes
1 answer
70 views

Word that is equivalent to "wrote" but is more impactful/powerful and more appropriate in a formal context?

I wrote the following sentence in my resume and got blasted with criticism (intended to help me of course): Delivered over 100 reports summarizing x, y, and z for ... Complaint 1: Did you deliver ...
AIQ's user avatar
  • 10k

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