Questions tagged [formality]

is for questions about whether a word or phrase is considered formal or informal. Be sure to include as much context as you can, because sometimes how formal or informal a word or phrase is can be different in different situations.

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2
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1answer
152 views

India specific- Addressing multiple men and women in an interview

In an interview in India, how am I supposed to greet the people (all of them together) in the interview panel? The interview panel consists of at least two men and at least two women. Good morning, ...
-1
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1answer
30 views

“Hi Joe” vs. “Hi Mr Parker” when writing an email

Joseph Parker is an English tutor and he likes his students call him Joe. By tutor, I mean he doesn't teach at college or school. He teaches English with an online classroom. Which probably means it's ...
0
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1answer
11 views

Did a program or have taken part in a program?

I want to say that I "did" a student exchange program in another country. which way is the correct way of writing that in a formal letter / application: I have taken part in a student ...
1
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3answers
51 views

Asking 'why are you asking this to me?'

Someone asks me a question in very formal conversation. And I want to know why he/she is asking me this question. Basically, I want to know the reason and purpose behind this question. How can I ask ...
0
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2answers
22 views

How do we build a dialogue?

I struggle a lot with dialogues, and I was wondering if you could tell me which of these sentences is correct. If neither is, could you tell me how to build it correctly? :) “I told her my secret.” ...
1
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0answers
14 views

Do we say “given” or “given that“?

Which is the formal one? “Given I’m tired, I won’t be there.” “Given that I am tired, I won’t be there.” Can we omit the “that” after “given” or it won’t be formal anymore? Other examples: I don’t ...
0
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1answer
25 views

Is “to be (couple of pages) in” formal or informal?

For example: I lost interest after I had been a couple of pages in. Can we use this sentence in formal situations?
0
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1answer
44 views

Make a warning message sound as official as possible [closed]

I am attempting to write a warning message for an email program. My users have informed me that the message sounds unofficial and somewhat scammy. WARNING: The sender of this email is from someone ...
-1
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1answer
46 views

Why do people call you a nickname when you introduce yourself with a proper name

As a rule, I always introduce myself using my proper first name, "Thomas". With this I expect people to refer to me and call me by that name. However, there are a significant number of people who go ...
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0answers
21 views

How much time does it take to be an English master [closed]

How much time does it take to be an English master I mean how to speak English like your native language and how much time does it take???
0
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3answers
46 views

Is 'be to verb' the only case of

any construct getting formal when they get shorter? Normally, when you shorten a phrase, then they feel like informal or colloquial. I heard that 'be to' construct is the short form of 'be going to' ...
1
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2answers
33 views

Compliance “to be mandatory”

I want to ask a question about the function of the word "compliance". I was writing a text regarding politics and wanted to mention whether if the United Kingdom left the EU whether some of the ...
0
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0answers
47 views

Is it correct to say “the problem of living cost increasing”?

I'm curious about the right way to say the rising of living cost, because usually I will use: The problem of living cost increasing The living cost increasing problem The increasing of living cost ...
-2
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1answer
50 views

Why is “Don't do such stupid things” unnatural? [closed]

I talked to two native speakers of English, and they did not say anything was wrong with the following sentence: Don't do stupid shit. But they said that the following sentence is not ...
0
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1answer
34 views

“that is” in speech

When "that is" means "in other words," can it be used in colloquial speech? Or is it more suited to a formal register? Does the following sound natural in daily speech? We, that is, my brother and ...
3
votes
1answer
78 views

Are contractions discouraged in formal writing? [closed]

I remember reading something long ago that says people should avoid contractions in formal writing. I wonder whether that is true. And by formal writing, I mean specifically the four types: (1) ...
0
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0answers
34 views

The phrase “in duplicate”

What does the following statement mean ? Admit card should be submitted in DUPLICATE. a) 1 original & 1 photocopy. b) Both originals. c) Both photocopies.
1
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1answer
133 views

Is “how long are you here for” formal or informal?

What exactly is the difference in meaning of the following sentences? How long are you here for? How long have you been here? Since when have you been here? How long will you be here? ...
1
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2answers
221 views

Is the phrase “Do more harm than good” formal?

I would like to ask about the formality of the phrase "Do more harm than good". Could I use it in formal writing such as an essay? Since it is an idiom, and my teacher said that the majority of ...
8
votes
4answers
4k views

Can I pay my credit card?

As far as I know, the direct object of pay (when meaning provide money for something) is who or what you want to pay. However, I read the following sentence from a (supposedly) native speaker: Can ...
0
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0answers
315 views

THe formal form for Let's see

I want to say: First, let's see what is the concept of (a word). The question is how can I write this part of the sentence (let's see) in a formal manner?
1
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1answer
43 views

It's a book of my mother's

If we say: It's a book of my mother's How could this sentence be identified? Wrong, archaic, formal or something else?
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2answers
127 views

What would be a formal substitute for the informal quantifiers “a lot of” and “lots of”?

A lot of, lots of with a noun We use a lot of and lots of in informal styles. Lots of is more informal than a lot of. A lot of and lots of can both be used with plural countable nouns and with ...
1
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1answer
11 views

Is it rightly used the semicolon at this paragraph

I appreciate if someone could check whether it is rightly used the semicolon and the word "thereby" at this paragraph, keeping in mind that this is formal english. If the producer have to assume more ...
2
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3answers
77 views

Is “I did not breakfast today” correct?

Is the following sentence correct? I did not breakfast today Due to breakfast coming from ‘to break your fast’.
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2answers
156 views

How to say “does this make a difference?” more formally?

[Some fact about our component.] Does this make a difference for inclusion in the OtherCompany App Store? Sounds not as formal as I would like a business email to be. It's passable, I think, but I ...
0
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2answers
40 views

“Is there…?” or “there is… .”

To solve some problem, I want to confirm our partners whether we have any measures. Is the following sentence grammatically wrong? “Please advise is there any procedures we can take?” Since “...
4
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1answer
291 views

Is it informal to use “so on ” in the article?

I have written this phrase The input of the DNN is the features extracted automatically by feature_extractor model, which are given to the first hidden layer, and the outputs of this layer are ...
1
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2answers
1k views

'May I know…' if 'May I know when this group was established?' sounds natural? May I know other ways to ask this question?

May I know when this group was established? Hello. I learned in a text that we can say 'May I know...?' in formal situations. But an American teacher of English told me it sounded unnatural. He said '...
1
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1answer
566 views

Formal connectors of results (“in this way”, “hence”, “thusly” and “as follows”) [closed]

In the following examples, are the terms ("in this way", "hence", "thusly" and "as follows") synonyms sufficiently formal to be used in academic work with a sense of result? In this way, as this ...
0
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1answer
1k views

Is “he will be come around 1pm” or “he will come around 1pm” more formal?

I would like to know which sentence is more formal in "he will be come around 1pm on tomorrow afternoon" and "he will come around 1pm on tomorrow afternoon"
1
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1answer
85 views

Overuse of pronouns [closed]

In the paragraph: "Company with 8 years of commercial experience, they are in the growth stage within the primary sector of the economy, they have a workforce of approximately 200 employees, ...
0
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1answer
165 views

A specific way of asking for a meeting?

Can one say "... if you(I) could see me(you) on Friday..." when requesting a meeting?
0
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0answers
37 views

position of “from”

Is there any difference between the following sentences? They returned where they had come from. They returned from where they had come.
3
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1answer
137 views

Is it right to use the word 'execute' in place of 'run'?

I have recently studied two sentences in which these words are used which i mentioned: your program is not executing. your program is not running. these two words often used in sentences so my ...
2
votes
1answer
895 views

How to use the verb “to hope for” in the right tense for something that hasn’t happened yet?

I am sending formal mail to a German company so I was wondering whether the following sentence is ok to use in that correspondence? We are hoping for the best results. Does this sentence make any ...
1
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2answers
219 views

Why was “wise advisor” better than “savvy person”?

See Question 10 in the image. He was to be loyal to his lord, courageous in his defense, and a (10) savvy person. Basically, he was to be a man of honor, who would stay true to his Christian faith ...
3
votes
1answer
41k views

“can we schedule the call to” vs “can we do the call at”?

I am writing a business email and want to schedule a call with the recipient. Which of the following is correct, if any: Can we schedule the call to 9 AM? Can we do the call at 9 AM? Can we have ...
2
votes
3answers
36k views

“I would be very happy if I could have…” Is this natural sentence with manners?

I would be very happy if I could have such an opportunity to see you in person, so please let me know whenever (if?) you will have a chance to visit this area. Is this natural sentence with manners? ...
1
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1answer
97 views

Which is more formal: clearer or more clear?

I know both forms are correct, but I wonder which is more formal. Is there any difference in levels of formality?
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3answers
120 views

Application of “Misunderstand” in the Past Continuous Tense

I have doubt that whether the following sentence is correct or not: Anytime my teacher was teaching the lesson, I was misunderstanding some notable points. Actually, I want to use this sentence in ...
0
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3answers
428 views

What is the difference between 'drawback' and 'side effect'?

In terms of Computer Programming, people around me mostly say 'side effect', when they talk about something that will happen behind the scenes, and it sounds pretty negative. However, when I read some ...
0
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1answer
57 views

Different ways to ask somebody to wait

Are there differences in meaning (and possibly context) of the following three ways to ask somebody to wait? Or is one of these options even ungrammatical? 1 I'm going to ... I'm just going to ...
2
votes
2answers
12k views

Why “yours truly” means “me”?

I don't understand how yours truly can mean me, they are two complete differents words, maybe if it was mine truly I could understand a little better, but the truly part would stil being strange. ¿...
-1
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1answer
46 views

Does “buck” mean “disagree” or “challenge” in this sentence, and how formally?

I heard this sentence from a show in TV, wants to know what does it mean. there are million free thinkers like us who refuse to obey the experts and buck their traditionalist fact. by sentence ...
2
votes
2answers
255 views

How does addressing a person as “dear” sound?

I am wondering if addressing a person as ''Dear'' sounds casual, friendly or formal. For example, ''Thanks dear'' Is it used in business letters nowadays or is it outdated? I hear "dear" ...
1
vote
1answer
70 views

Is this plain form “I requested her hand for marriage from her father” acceptable in general; as opposed to the idiomatic form?

The plain form which I feel more natural to my tongue: I requested her hand for marriage from her father As opposed to the idiomatic form: I asked her father for her hand in marriage Is the ...
0
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2answers
61 views

Using 'you' in scientific papers

In German, most of the time you try to avoid 'you' in academic papers. Of course I refer to 'you' in the meaning of 'in general' not you as a pronoun. What is the best practice in English?
2
votes
2answers
4k views

“Much much more” in formal language

How would I say, "much much more" in a formal manner? I need to write a report and cannot come up with a more formal way of saying, much much more. This is to be placed at the end of a list: ...
0
votes
1answer
324 views

Is omitting subject-auxiliary verb combination a formal and grammatical way of writing?

The left hand side of the equation is equal to the right hand side of it. Hence, proved. Wouldn't it be grammatically like this- The left hand side of the equation is equal to the right hand side ...