Questions tagged [formality]

is for questions about whether a word or phrase is considered formal or informal. Be sure to include as much context as you can, because sometimes how formal or informal a word or phrase is can be different in different situations.

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2
votes
3answers
10k views

What is the difference between someone and somebody? [closed]

Should I say: [•] I'm thinking about someone. Or [•] I'am thinking about somebody.
0
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0answers
158 views

meaning of the phrase "amped up on" in context

It is from Crash Course A&P. It is at 1 minute and 23 second. Here is the context: But even when they are functioming well, some of your immune cells are careening around your body like ...
2
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1answer
573 views

The usage of "see"

Are the following sentences grammatical? The summer of 2000 saw me in a research project at a museum in Africa. The summer of 2000 saw me doing a research project at a museum in Africa. The ...
3
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2answers
3k views

"People persons" versus "people people"

A People person is someone who is outgoing and has good communication skills. He was always energetic and positive and he was a people person. What is the plural of "people person"? I am ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

How to use the verb "to hope for" in the right tense for something that hasn’t happened yet?

I am sending formal mail to a German company so I was wondering whether the following sentence is ok to use in that correspondence? We are hoping for the best results. Does this sentence make any ...
1
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2answers
239 views

Why was "wise advisor" better than "savvy person"?

See Question 10 in the image. He was to be loyal to his lord, courageous in his defense, and a (10) savvy person. Basically, he was to be a man of honor, who would stay true to his Christian faith ...
3
votes
1answer
64k views

"can we schedule the call to" vs "can we do the call at"?

I am writing a business email and want to schedule a call with the recipient. Which of the following is correct, if any: Can we schedule the call to 9 AM? Can we do the call at 9 AM? Can we have ...
2
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3answers
46k views

"I would be very happy if I could have..." Is this natural sentence with manners?

I would be very happy if I could have such an opportunity to see you in person, so please let me know whenever (if?) you will have a chance to visit this area. Is this natural sentence with manners? ...
0
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1answer
51 views

Making question

I'd like to know the difference between Why don't you do it? Why do you not do it?" Could you please let me know the differences?
2
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7answers
1k views

How to say "a bit of code"

I am describing how this part of my code works: def store_output(self, file_name, identifier): dsc_in = ogr.Open(file_name) if dsc_in is None: raise Exception("Reading data failed.") ...
1
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1answer
133 views

Which is more formal: clearer or more clear?

I know both forms are correct, but I wonder which is more formal. Is there any difference in levels of formality?
1
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3answers
142 views

Application of "Misunderstand" in the Past Continuous Tense

I have doubt that whether the following sentence is correct or not: Anytime my teacher was teaching the lesson, I was misunderstanding some notable points. Actually, I want to use this sentence in ...
0
votes
3answers
740 views

What is the difference between 'drawback' and 'side effect'?

In terms of Computer Programming, people around me mostly say 'side effect', when they talk about something that will happen behind the scenes, and it sounds pretty negative. However, when I read some ...
0
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1answer
58 views

Different ways to ask somebody to wait

Are there differences in meaning (and possibly context) of the following three ways to ask somebody to wait? Or is one of these options even ungrammatical? 1 I'm going to ... I'm just going to ...
0
votes
1answer
168 views

"establish a startup" in conversation

I'd like to know whether "establish a startup" sounds pompous in a conversation as follows: John: Why did you decline that job offer? Peter: I decided to follow my dream and establish a startup. Now ...
2
votes
2answers
18k views

Why "yours truly" means "me"?

I don't understand how yours truly can mean me, they are two complete differents words, maybe if it was mine truly I could understand a little better, but the truly part would stil being strange. ¿...
-1
votes
1answer
49 views

Does "buck" mean "disagree" or "challenge" in this sentence, and how formally?

I heard this sentence from a show in TV, wants to know what does it mean. there are million free thinkers like us who refuse to obey the experts and buck their traditionalist fact. by sentence ...
1
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2answers
747 views

How does addressing a person as “dear” sound?

I am wondering if addressing a person as ''Dear'' sounds casual, friendly or formal. For example, ''Thanks dear'' Is it used in business letters nowadays or is it outdated? I hear "dear" ...
1
vote
1answer
76 views

Is this plain form "I requested her hand for marriage from her father" acceptable in general; as opposed to the idiomatic form?

The plain form which I feel more natural to my tongue: I requested her hand for marriage from her father As opposed to the idiomatic form: I asked her father for her hand in marriage Is the ...
0
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2answers
67 views

Using 'you' in scientific papers

In German, most of the time you try to avoid 'you' in academic papers. Of course I refer to 'you' in the meaning of 'in general' not you as a pronoun. What is the best practice in English?
2
votes
2answers
6k views

"Much much more" in formal language

How would I say, "much much more" in a formal manner? I need to write a report and cannot come up with a more formal way of saying, much much more. This is to be placed at the end of a list: ...
0
votes
1answer
360 views

Is omitting subject-auxiliary verb combination a formal and grammatical way of writing?

The left hand side of the equation is equal to the right hand side of it. Hence, proved. Wouldn't it be grammatically like this- The left hand side of the equation is equal to the right hand side ...
1
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2answers
1k views

"cranial" vs "cerebral"

Is there a substantial difference between the adjectives "cranial" and "cerebral"? Are these ones interchangeable in a not-so-medical context?
1
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1answer
96 views

Use the verb "to mothball" in official texts

I saw a Wikipedia article (and not only this one) using the verb "to mothball" to denote rather obsolete, abandoned, put-on-hold methods or phenomena, e.g.: So by 2003, the original ECMAScript 4 ...
1
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2answers
3k views

Bowed down at / before / in front of the altar

Which is the correct preposition to use here from the options given in title ? He bowed down ______ altar. I have mentioned three options here though I had 4 options in the question. I managed ...
8
votes
4answers
4k views

"Fixing" an error

Open source programmers commonly use the term "to fix" (as in "fixing an error") to mean to correct (eliminate) an error. Is this use of the term "to fix" common outside open source programming (both ...
2
votes
1answer
324 views

Formal letter: what is the English version of "En attandant votre réponse, veillez croire, Monsieur, à l’expression de ..."

I have a hard time writing a formal letter in English for the first time in my life and without any good reference or previous training. I am stuck in the final phase where I want to express that I am ...
1
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3answers
106 views

Is "crimp an aluminium cap on" a naturally-sounding phrase?

My translation from Russian: Fill the vial with nitrogen, then immediately close it with a stopper and crimp an aluminium cap on. The Russian original uses the word "завальцевать", which is ...
3
votes
1answer
46 views

Correct word order of “An article you are a co-writer of”?

I am having trouble with the wording of a sentence in a formal letter. I came up with this, but, for me, it feels somewhat twisted and incorrect. How would you pharse this? During my research, I ...
0
votes
0answers
31 views

Ellipsis scheme

Is it grammatical to write The highest score was 10, the lowest 2, and the median 5 or, particularly in a formal context, the implied verbs should be included, yielding the following (awkward?): ...
0
votes
1answer
106 views

Numbers in Words

How do we write 3,251 in words? A. Three thousand two hundred and fifty one B. Three thousand two hundred and fifty-one C. Three thousand two hundred fifty-one Essentially, I am requesting a ...
3
votes
1answer
320 views

'Into' more formal than 'in' in following context?

I placed the cake in the fridge. I placed the cake into the fridge. Is into more formal? To me in is sufficient because the movement of the cake into the fridge is implied, but I wonder whether ...
1
vote
3answers
108 views

He is fierce, as were warriors (so)

Is the so in this example incorrect or superfluous? I was thinking about the example of so with do: He asked me to send him money; I did (so). I wondered whether so could be used similarly in my ...
0
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1answer
404 views

'Sick leave' and 'ill versus sick'

We want to use the terms ill and illness in our software instead of sick (see also Is there any difference between being ill and sick?), but I'm having difficulty finding a proper replacement for the ...
0
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1answer
48 views

is this something we can write or just say

Is the sentence below run on or is it something we say to each other Isn't "Have a great morning/night" a run-on sentence? or can I say "you have a great morning/night"? Or is that just a sentence we ...
0
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1answer
8k views

Is 'I am glad to hear that' very formal or informal phrase?

I responded this to one professor when she expressed about her current research work. Later, I realized that that phrase could be very informal.
5
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3answers
9k views

Can you "carry a child" in your womb?

Can I use "carry a child" to replace "carry a pregnancy"? Are there any single-word verbs I can use in this sense? Surrogacy is an arrangement or agreement whereby a woman agrees to carry a ...
0
votes
2answers
8k views

How do you say: "I was doing many things at the same time"

I work with people that speaks in English (my native language is Spanish). Yesterday I gave the wrong information to a coworker, so I wanted to apologize and explain that my mind was doing several ...
3
votes
1answer
2k views

Someone who has passed lots of difficulties in their lives

Please suppose someone who has had lots of difficulties in his life and has passed many problems so far. Someone who had been without money, food and even a home to live in for a long time and as the ...
0
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2answers
9k views

Third Conditionals: "If I knew..." instead of "had known..." in casual register

I know that in the following sentences "If I had known" has to be used in the place of "If I knew" to form the grammatically right sentences. What I really want be sure of is that as a native if all ...
1
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1answer
53 views

When someone owes money everyone

There is a sentence which says "He owes money left and right." which says has has borrowed money from almost everyone. I would appreciate it if someone could let me know if the following sentence ...
0
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2answers
38 views

When you've done an ambulatory surgery

I was wondering if someone could let me know which one of the following self-made sentences sounds more natural in the way that it could be more understood not only by well-educated people of English ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

"The book tells the story, consisting of X, Y, and Z." or "... the story, which consists of X, Y, and Z"

Which of these is grammatically correct and considered as a formal writing style? The book tells the story, consisting of X, Y, and Z. or The book tells the story, which consists of X, Y, and Z....
1
vote
2answers
2k views

Saying "You'll feel me on this"

So, recently, I saw someone commenting, "You'll feel me on this" on a certain post. Since I'm not really familiar with phrases that are more informal (even regarded as slang) in English, I wanted to ...
1
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1answer
547 views

Born with a weight of 5kg

Which of these would it make sense for me to say? My baby was born with a weight of 5kg My baby was born at 5kg My baby was born weighing 5kg Thank you.
0
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1answer
5k views

Appropriate response to: Would it be suitable to meet tomorrow noon at your office?

Can I respond to: "Would it be suitable to meet tomorrow noon at your office?" with: "Sure would!"
3
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2answers
1k views

Usage of "on cloud nine"?

I heard "I'm on cloud nine" in a song and realized it was an expression by reading it somewhere else. I am learning English for years but I never heard of that before. I found informations about the ...
3
votes
2answers
263 views

Should we end the given sentence with TO in the given situation?

He's this person who I owe 40$ (to). He's this person I owe 40$ to. He's this person who I owe 40$. Are all these sentences grammatically correct? Are the first and second one grammatically ...
0
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2answers
15k views

Speak with you later

As far as I know, it is not common. However, I heard saying "speak with you later" instead of "talk to you later or bye" sounds rather formal and suits business conversations? Is it correct?