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Questions tagged [french]

For questions regarding loan words from, and similarities to, the French language

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How would you translate "le rendez-vous du tout Paris" in English?

This is a "famous" French expression and to be honest, I thought Anglophone speakers used it too, I was almost sure I'd heard it before. Some research online and no results. Do you know if ...
Mathilde Da Silva's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
21 views

Which one would you use "the", "that" or "this"? About English Anaphora

I read a book about French anaphora. In French, there is a distinction between the definite article "le" and the demonstrative "ce", and I wonder if the same usage also applies to ...
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0 votes
4 answers
127 views

What is the English word for "something stupid done by a child", similar to French "faire une bêtise"?

In French, we have the word bêtise that I find surprisingly hard to translate. Bêtise (coming from adjective bête, "dumb") has different meanings, all related to "dumbness": its ...
C. Crt's user avatar
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1 answer
62 views

Which part of French's influence on English vocabulary is larger, the one that came from Latin, or the one that didn't?

https://ell.stackexchange.com/a/335999/499 says A computerised survey of about 80,000 words in the OED estimated the origin of English words to be as follows: French: 28.30% Latin: 28.24% Since ...
Tim's user avatar
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5 votes
3 answers
1k views

Can "correct" be used in the sense of "decent" in "My day was correct/decent"?

After a discussion with a French native speaker, I am asking here: Can the sentence "My day was correct" be used synonymously with "My day was decent" when answering to "How ...
Anon's user avatar
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0 votes
3 answers
97 views

Meaning of "players" and "port of a bitt"

The Cotgrave Dictionarie of the French and English Tongues (1611) has this definition for the word Babillon: Babillon: m. The players that hang to the port of a bitt. Can anyone shed some light ...
jlliagre's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
103 views

Which other word can I use instead of "bet"

I'm developing an application about gambling and I need an other word than "bet". The users can create their own bets then every other players can place a bet on a proposition. For example : ...
M. Ozn's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
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Suggestions to follow while tutoring online a French student who wants to improve his speaking listening skills in English? [closed]

I'll be tutoring online a french student who I think has at least an advanced intermediate level in all parts of English, and wants to improve his speaking and listening skills, specially following ...
Stat_math's user avatar
  • 111
1 vote
1 answer
77 views

How do you say something equivalent to French expression "public facile"?

In French, there is an expression that says "public facile" ... means somebody who will easily approve/enjoy pieces music or other arts if they are asked their opinion. I would tend to translate it ...
TTT's user avatar
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1 answer
117 views

Is par eminence a French term?

Is par eminence a French term? What does it mean? Here is a sample sentence from The New York Times" For more than two centuries there has always been somebody who, like the Duke of Cambridge, has ...
Hassan Bashiri's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
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How to express “Cela comptera moins”? (What are the most important objectives and those that'll count less)

In the French sentence: Quels sont les objectifs les plus importants et ceux qui compteront moins ? That I can approximately translate into: What are the most important objectives and those ...
JKHA's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
2k views

How to differentiate from French "Bon courage" and "Bonne chance" in English?

In French we distinguish Bon courage/Good courage and Bonne chance/Good luck. But we don't say "Good courage" in english. In English it seems like we say "Good luck" for both. Although for me, as a ...
Elfayer's user avatar
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7 votes
1 answer
293 views

Best English equivalent for the French word "parcelle": plot or parcel?

I am working on a project where I have to define some spaces we define in French as parcelles, which are in my case part of lands used for a specific usage, such as plantations. After looking for a ...
Izuka's user avatar
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3 votes
3 answers
2k views

English equivalent of French "Sousou"

I'm translating a French text and they used the word "sousou" : "Tiens, quelques sousous pour t'acheter un bonbon." -> "Here, some ? to buy a candy" A "sou" is a coin and "sousou(s)" (s added for ...
sixolar's user avatar
  • 31
2 votes
2 answers
462 views

What does "a convenient façade" mean?

When I read a book, I have a incognizant word in the book: When you set the frame, you set the bounds size and position. In general, you should regard the frame as a convenient façade and no more. ...
aircraft's user avatar
  • 543
0 votes
1 answer
320 views

Are there some words pronounced in English as in French?

Do you have an example, or several ones, of words that are pronounced the same (or very very close), in English and in French?
Quidam's user avatar
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1 answer
360 views

How to translate "tu as toute ta place ici" from French

I am actually writing my first song in English and was wondering how to translate "tu as toute ta place ici" from French to English. It means "this is your place, yours, truly yours, you can stay". ...
Revolucion for Monica's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
358 views

English equivalent for French "assaut de courtoisie"?

On StackExchange, after we've asked a question and got an answer, or ourselves posted an answer, it frequently happens that a complementary discussion is established through comments, where we ...
cFreed's user avatar
  • 311
3 votes
1 answer
130 views

English equivalent for French "les attendus d'un procès"?

In French the yet archaic term les attendus remains the traditional way to designate the part of text, in the report of a trial, which explains the motivations that led the court to its final decision....
cFreed's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
1k views

English equivalent of French "quiproquo" (bis)

This question is related to this one and this other one, both regarding the same matter but from distinct points of view. After reading the above posts I remained unsatisfied because of what I see ...
cFreed's user avatar
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13 votes
4 answers
17k views

English equivalent of French "quiproquo"

In English, quid pro quo refers to a barter-style exchange. I'll do this for you and you'll do something for me. There is this quote from the movie The Silence of the Lambs(1991) where Dr Lecter says: ...
user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
90 views

a continuous 20000 km-long chain of encounters (or "people")

Is this sentence understandable? a continuous 20000 km-long chain of encounters (or "people") in french that would be : Une chaine interrompue de rencontre sur 20 000 km. ("Chaine" in this ...
JinSnow's user avatar
  • 401
2 votes
1 answer
439 views

French --> English "À leur tour"

I'm trying to translate the french "À leur tour" into English. I believe Literal translation would give something like this : "It was now their turn to" The sentence is the ...
Minimorum's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
1k views

Translate "héhé" to English

I know that's a really weird question but really interesting I think. In French, we say héhé when we're kindly (like a friend would do) making fun of someone or something. We could also replace it by ...
kiwixz's user avatar
  • 153
8 votes
10 answers
2k views

English equivalent for French "manquer de réussite" in a soccer game

In French, when a soccer team plays pretty well but doesn't manage to score, we say they "manque de réussite". Is there any English expression that conveys a similar meaning? (I feel that "lack of ...
Franck Dernoncourt's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
190 views

Translation of "building the sense of concern of others and what surrounds us"

I am trying to translate a French phrase*, which literally says: Building the sense of concern of those and what surround us Or, in "better" English: Building the sense of concern of others ...
MagTun's user avatar
  • 361
3 votes
1 answer
188 views

tolerance: "practicing" it, "living" it?

I'm trying to find a way to express a french sentence in English "Suffit-il de prêcher la tolérance pour la vivre ?" Which literally means "is it enough to preach tolerance to live it?" Is it correct ...
JinSnow's user avatar
  • 401
6 votes
3 answers
2k views

English equivalent for French “la rentrée"?

In French we use “la rentrée" to mean the return to work after the slack period of the summer break in France. It is used by students, workers and pretty much anyone else. Is there any English ...
Franck Dernoncourt's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
529 views

English equivalent for French “Culture générale"?

The French expression “Culture générale" is deeply entrenched in philosophical and humanist ideas: Le projet d’une culture générale est intrinsèquement lié à des réflexions à propos de l'humanité,...
Franck Dernoncourt's user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
566 views

Should I use “cool” to talk about up-to-date data?

I’m working on a REST project, so the “fraicheur” of data is quite important. I know that the translation of “frais” is “cool”. Should I use this word in an IT technical environment (not only for ...
Fractaliste's user avatar