Questions tagged [future-time]

Refers to the many ways a speaker can refer to future time in English. There are five major ways and over a dozen ways total to refer to future time.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
1
vote
2answers
23 views

Distinguishing present from future in a conditional sentence

Consider the following sentences, used in an email message: I'm going to be on vacation next week. If you need anything, call me. It could mean If you need anything now, call me, because next ...
0
votes
0answers
61 views

Have got married

Have you got married They have got married Are these sentences used to ask someone whether he/she or they have decided to get married on a particular date, are they ready for it, or something else?
1
vote
2answers
77 views

The progressive futurate is not aspectual: meaning?

Both the Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (CGEL) by Pullum and Oxford Modern English Grammar (OMEG) by Aarts clearly say that the progressive futurate (i.e., the present progressive ...
1
vote
2answers
149 views

What is difference between these three sentences- “would”, “would have”, and “will”

1.Tag those who'll attend her concert 2.Tag those who'd attend her concert 3.Tag those who'd have attended her concert
0
votes
0answers
24 views

Expressions to refer to some point in the future

Which of the following expressions is idiomatic and\or grammatical? I think I will be busy until I become 45 or something. By that time, my children will be mature enough to depend more on ...
4
votes
1answer
351 views

What tense is used in “Tomorrow I die”?

"Tomorrow I die. Tomorrow I die, and today I want to tell the world what happened and thus perhaps free my soul from the horrible weight which lies upon it." by Edgar Allan Poe in "The Black Cat" ...
0
votes
2answers
40 views

In the next chapter we are going to learn or in the next chapter we will learn?

In texts (books, tutorials, etc) when we want to express an action that will happen in the text itself, such as giving instructions or explaining a subject, should we use will or going to? In this ...
3
votes
4answers
19k views

The use of the Future Perfect Continuous Passive in 'The apples will have been being eaten by him'

The apples will have been being eaten by him. This sentence above was offered in my English class as an example of the future perfect continuous tense. This seems to me too awkward to be correct. ...
1
vote
1answer
3k views

“I go to school tomorrow” to imply that I will attend school tomorrow

"I go to school tomorrow" to imply that I will attend school tomorrow. Is the aforementioned expression within inverted commas correct?
0
votes
1answer
58 views

Simple present vs. deterministic future

When I record a video in which I demonstrate a software application in action, I should say I click on the button or I am clicking on the button? In the video, I click on the button one second after ...
2
votes
1answer
3k views

“Will” vs “Maybe I will” and “I think I will”

Almost every English grammar book I`ve studied claims that "Will" is used to talk about plans decided at the moment of speaking. Sentences like "I will help you" or "I'll wait for you" give a strong ...
0
votes
1answer
33 views

Present Simple as Future

We use Present Simple when the thing that will happen in the future time. But can we use Present Simple when no time is specified. For example: What happens to him after that? Choose what happens to ...
2
votes
1answer
388 views

Ask correctly about something in the future : “Will candidates get accommodation ?”

I always find difficulties in asking properly in English. Can you help me to correct the following : Will the selected candidates for both fellowships get accommodation and/or any financial ...
0
votes
1answer
108 views

Use of Simple Tense for future action without will & Shall

I Hope She forgives me. Above sentence gives idea about future action of her without using Will, Shall etc. We can use Simple Present tense to describe future scheduled, planed action.. Considering ...
0
votes
0answers
13 views

Do I have to use the present simple or the future simple in the “what clause” after the phrase “be worried about” when referring to the future?

Tell me please which one of the following sentences is correct when talking about the future. I am not worried about what will happen. I am not worrued about what happens.
2
votes
1answer
30 views

The present continuous vs. the 'going to' construction for future events

Is there any slight difference between the two sentences below? I’m taking the car to the mechanic’s shop tomorrow. I’m going to take the car to the mechanic’s shop tomorrow.
0
votes
1answer
33 views

Is it better to use simple past or present perfect for a future event?

If any man hurts my daughter, I will hurt him as much as he has hurt her Could it be past simple as at the time of writing the hurting if there was one, it would be finished and hopefully would ...
2
votes
2answers
294 views

I will <do> <have done> the work by 5 o’clock

1. I will do the work by 5 o’clock. It means that we will be able to say "I'm doing the work." at some moment before 5 o'clock inclusive. That is we don't mean the work will already be done/finished ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

Question about the tense of “until …” in a object clause

Quite confused about it. Here is a sentence: I was wondering if you could lend me a few dollars until I get paid on Friday. Why is got or would get improper here? Compared with: I said I would go ...
0
votes
1answer
169 views

Is 'to tomorrow' correct?

"The meeting is postponed to tomorrow" Is this grammatically correct? If not, how should it be conveyed?
1
vote
1answer
3k views

You should make your bed after you wake up / after you woke up / after you have woken up? Which one to choose?

Ok, I should say: You should make your bed after you wake up. or You should make your bed after you woke up. or You should make your bed after you have woken up. In case 1, the waking-up action ...
1
vote
1answer
20 views

Present tense or Will

The person who wins gets the prize The person who wins will get the prize The person who will win gets the prize The person who will win will get the prize Which of the above are ...
0
votes
1answer
20 views

Going to plus if

is it correct to ask What are you going to do if you lose your pants on the train? Or maybe better to ask What are you going to do when you lose your pants on the train? Thanks.
0
votes
1answer
26 views

“If I was” vs “If I am” vs “If I become” vs “I would be”?

Which sentence is better to use? "Please active my trial, if I was happy, I'll switch to paid version." "Please active my trial, if I am happy, I'll switch to paid version." "Please active my ...
6
votes
3answers
501 views

Can we say “you can pay when the order gets ready”?

Is it true to say “you can pay when the order gets ready”? Can we use “get + ready” for the things that will happen in future??
0
votes
1answer
19 views

present continuous or going to in that case

I made an order through the net to reserve a record then in the comment place I wrote "I m not going to cancel this order as I did last time with the previous one" would it be possible to write" I ...
1
vote
1answer
750 views

Asking question regarding future

I have a scenario in which I am asking someone "When she get the accommodation in university?" She said "She will get the accommodation when she will be 22." Now I want to turn this into ...
7
votes
2answers
3k views

“It doesn't matter” or “it won't matter”?

It doesn't matter. It won't matter. Where is correct? Still confused when I use it so tell me good people where is the correct what should I talk
2
votes
3answers
108 views

Using “Supposed to” in a prediction

I have been arguing with my friends over the usage of 'supposed to' for quite a while now. It is my belief that 'supposed to' is used to describe the obligation of the subject. For example: "I am ...
3
votes
2answers
50 views

Does this sentence need “will”?

The book I use to learn English has this example sentence, To tell the truth, I do not want to go to the party tomorrow because the examinations begin the day after tomorrow. I think this should be '...
1
vote
2answers
36 views

continuous or going to

Please would you mind shipping directly to me as I am shipping to you next monday Is it better to use going to, I don't think so because Iam going to do it for sure and I can't use present because it ...
0
votes
1answer
45 views

Why “we are seeing them tonight” is correct?

I don't understand why the phrase "we are seeing them tonight" is correct. I would rather say "we are going to see them tonight" because the construction "to be going to" is used when you have planned ...
6
votes
4answers
29k views

How to say that you have plans to go to the movies tonight?

How to say that you have plans to go to the movies tonight (but you are not sure yet, maybe you will have a pizza)? I mean there are options: I am going to the cinema tonight. Way too much ...
3
votes
1answer
341 views

Why not present continuous or “going to” for these events?

This week, we are going on a trip to Europe. First, we will stop in London for five days. Then we fly to Rome for two days. After that, we go to Vienna. Why not present continuous if all has ...
1
vote
1answer
180 views

Using the present continuous or “going to” in “He is sure that he will be working for them next year”

This year he has flown over 60,000 miles for his job. He has been working for Crossinglives & Co. for almost two years now. He is sure that he (work) will be working for them next year as well. ...
2
votes
1answer
4k views

What are we going to do now? / What will we do now?

I and my friend discussed a grammar exercise related to future tenses like this: We seem to be completely lost. What (we, do) _________ now? For me, 'what are we going to do now' sounds much more ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

Simple future or “be going to” in: “Help! I will/am going to fall”

Do I use the simple future tense or the "be going to" tense in a situation that has not yet happened? Help! I will fall. Help! I am going to fall My approach: I think the action will ...
3
votes
1answer
75 views

“He IS / WILL BE running a marathon this Saturday” – difference in meaning

1a. Michael will be running a marathon this Saturday. 1b. Michael is running a marathon this Saturday. 2a. Michael will be DJing at the Manchester festival this Saturday. 2b. Michael is ...
2
votes
1answer
67 views

Difference between “will” and “would” for predictions

What is the difference between will and would in the following sentence? In the following news link, why is would used instead of will? Here is the link and the headline: Why the US would never ...
0
votes
2answers
855 views

Some point “in future” or “in the future”

Using the is when we refer to something known to the reader or something specific. It is not clear to me how to deal with a word like future. Here is an example: They may get access to the book at ...
3
votes
4answers
167 views

Will or would in future time

Why in following news they use "she'd" and not "she will" to talking about the future ? And crucially, it's not clear how far she'd actually go in criticising Vladimir Putin himself, a close family ...
1
vote
1answer
7k views

“Will be” vs “Will have been”

By 2030, New well-paid jobs ______ available. ("will be" or "will have been"?) I'm not really sure if will have been is the right answer here. I mean this isn't a completed action so wouldn't "will ...
9
votes
9answers
5k views

The expressions “This Monday” and “Next Monday”

Suppose it is Wednesday: Does the expression "This Monday" mean: The Monday of the same week. The Monday of the following week. Does the expression "Next Monday" mean: The Monday of the following ...
4
votes
2answers
123k views

“Will come” or “Will be coming”

Almost all my friends say "I will be coming tomorrow" to refer that they are coming tomorrow. Why don't they say "I will come tomorrow"? (Note that they are not saying like "will be coming tomorrow ...
-1
votes
1answer
32 views

Using “when” to talk about the future

When the new park opens, I’ll go there every day. When the new park has opened, I'll go there every day. Can we use both of these? What is the difference between them?
1
vote
1answer
10k views

Future tense - I would be available anytime until 12pm or after 8pm from 2nd of April

Is this sentence grammatically correct? I will be available anytime until 12pm or after 8pm from 2nd of April. or I am available anytime until 12pm or after 8pm from 2nd of April.
1
vote
1answer
86 views

after retired or after retiring or after retirement?

I am preparing a speech about the life after retire. But not sure which one is correct below. After retire, I want to be a happy person. After retirement, I want to be a happy person. ...
9
votes
1answer
23k views

Can we say “I'll be there one hour later” instead of “I'll be there in an hour”?

I understan "I'll be there in an hour." is a correct sentence, but if I make the sentence to "I'll be there one hour later." is that correct? and same meaning? if not, why is it incorrect? i'm ...
1
vote
1answer
861 views

“Later on” vs “More later”

Is there any difference using the expression "Later on" vs "More later"? for example: I will work later on and I will work more later
0
votes
1answer
672 views

“I hope he tells” vs. “I hope he will tell”

I saw these two phrase and I was wondering which one is correct? I hope he tells me the truth I hope he will tell me the truth