Questions tagged [future-time]

Refers to the many ways a speaker can refer to future time in English. There are five major ways and over a dozen ways total to refer to future time.

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“is getting” vs “will get”

Are there difference between those sentences? Alex is getting married next month. Alex will get married next month. Seems that the first one is expressed in present continues, and the ...
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How to say that you have plans to go to the movies tonight?

How to say that you have plans to go to the movies tonight (but you are not sure yet, maybe you will have a pizza)? I mean there are options: I am going to the cinema tonight. Way too much ...
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Usage of the Present simple and the Future Progressive [duplicate]

Why we use the Present Simple in the sentence: The train leaves at half past six tomorrow morning. I think the future progressive also may use there. It is because future progressive can denote ...
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Does “to” refer to a future event

I stuck at page 338, Longman Student Grammar of Spoken and Written English. Here's an excerpt, Certainty adjective controlling subject-to-subject raising 1.[The government] is unlikely to meet ...
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2answers
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“he leaves for New York tomorrow”. vs. “he will leave for New York tomorrow”

Which one is grammatically correct? I don't know when he leaves for New York tomorrow. or I don't know when he will leave for New York tomorrow Is it correct to use the future form of the ...
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The expressions “This Monday” and “Next Monday”

Suppose it is Wednesday: Does the expression "This Monday" mean: The Monday of the same week. The Monday of the following week. Does the expression "Next Monday" mean: The Monday of the following ...
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2answers
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Why must the future tense not be used after 'unless'?

[Source:] !! Do not use the future tense after unless [✓] I won't go unless you go [✘] [I won't go] unless you will go. [✘] Why not? Even if the above is prescriptive, what may be some reasons? ...
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1answer
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The usage of the present simple for the future actions

I've got a bunch of examples dealing with the same issue. I have had some opinions on them but some of the opinions are controversial. So, I hope to get a better picture from you. The issue deals with ...
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2answers
181 views

difference: be going; will

It’s not easy to discern which to choose among ‘be going to’ and ‘will’ to express a near future plan or intention. I’m going to bring up two cases. [A] In a situation that when one says “Oh, I’m hot,...
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2answers
739 views

Why is the present simple tense used for an event that is in the future?

I would like to know the difference between "be going to," the present continuous, and the present simple. We use one of them when we talk about future, but I can't differentiate them. For example: ...
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Tenses to refer to the future

I would like to know if there are any other tenses or grammatical structures to use for speaking about the future apart from will (perfect tense included), going to, simple and continuous present. I ...
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“When this battle will be finally over” - shouldn't it be “When this battle is finally over”?

I read something in the manga: When this battle will finally be over... take me out to eat some tasty yakiniku. "when...will be" seems strange to me, isn't it better saying "When this battle is ...
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1answer
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You should make your bed after you wake up / after you woke up / after you have woken up? Which one to choose?

Ok, I should say: You should make your bed after you wake up. or You should make your bed after you woke up. or You should make your bed after you have woken up. In case 1, the waking-up action ...
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4answers
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“I will be loving you 'til we're 70” vs. “I will love you 'til we're 70”

From Ed Sheeran's song Thinking Out Loud: And, darling, I will be loving you 'til we're 70 Why is it not And, darling, I will love you 'til we're 70 ? Why is progressive used here?
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A sentence in Present tense was understood as future tense

I came across a Chinese web site selling skirts and then paid for two skirts in different colors. After I had paid for the skirts, I sent a short message to them: please let me know when you send ...
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4answers
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is it possible to use the present simple tense with the time marker 'this evening'?

Recently I have come across the following usage of the present simple tense in the coursebook Cambridge English Key for Schools Result OUP 2013: Excuse me. Do you close at 8 o'clock this evening? ~ ...
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'We are having a party this evening' - Why do we use the present continuous?

I have a sentence: We are having a party this evening. I don't know why we use present continuous. In grammar, we don't use having for possess.
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“as we discuss in detail in a moment” - why not “as we'll discuss”?

The term 'raising verb' is potentially confusing. It is not the verb itself that undergoes movement. Rather, it is the complement subject that raises into the matrix clause, as we discuss in detail in ...
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Can “revolution that would transform” be rewritten as “revolution that transformed”?

The period 1786–9 saw the collapse of the old regime, and the rise of a revolution that would transform the nature and practice of politics. Source: Marisa Linton: Choosing Terror, p. 48. My ...
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1answer
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It will be or it will have been

Please tell me what the difference between the following sentences is Tomorrow it will be ten years since we moved in. Tomorrow it will have been ten years since we moved in. Thank you.
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Difference between “will” and “would” for predictions

What is the difference between will and would in the following sentence? In the following news link, why is would used instead of will? Here is the link and the headline: Why the US would never ...
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“Ask Jim if he's staying tonight” or “Ask Jim if he stays tonight”

I know we can use present simple when talking about the future, especially after subordinate clauses. On the other hand, I also know that we can use present progressive to talk about future events, ...