Stack Exchange Network

Stack Exchange network consists of 175 Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers.

Visit Stack Exchange

Questions tagged [grammar]

This tag is for grammar questions, but only if you're not certain what other tag to use. If possible, tag as tense, verb, articles, prepositions, or some other more specific tag or tags instead.

5
votes
4answers
4k views

“Agree to do something” or “agree doing something”?

User can postpone receiving notifications. The doer of notifying is the application not the user. I wonder if this sentence is correct. Do you agree to postpone receiving this notification for 2 ...
5
votes
2answers
39k views

Looking forward to a reply

There are lots of looking forward to questions, such as this one. Can this sentence: "I am looking forward to hearing from your reply" Also be written as: "I am looking forward to your reply" ...
5
votes
5answers
7k views

stop (from) doing

There's a fence to stop people (from) walking on the grass. The Murphy's grammar says that from is optional in the structure "stop somebody (from) doing." But for me this particular sentence without ...
5
votes
4answers
4k views

Introduction of more than one person: Sir, this is Tom, Jerry, and their sister Mary; or should it be “these are”?

Reading the article "How to Introduce People", I (not a native English speaker) found no rules for introducing of two (or more) people. Neither could I find links to the related posts here, on ELL. ...
5
votes
3answers
539 views

Like father, like son

In the phrase "Like father, like son" what part-of-speech is each "like"? Just in case somebody asks, I am aware of the meaning, thank you, I'm interested in the grammar.
5
votes
1answer
77 views

What is the name of this construction?

I've got an excerpt from a book here and I want to know what kind of grammatical construction this is: He set off for the stairs with the others trailing after him. I want to research it, but I ...
5
votes
2answers
6k views

Is it correct to use multiple tenses within a paragraph in a story?

I was wondering what tense I should use for writing a story. What I use is a Present and past tense mixture. But I am not sure whether they are right or wrong. If I write something general, I use ...
5
votes
1answer
2k views

the structure “like for somebody to do something”

I ran into this in the novel The Old Man and the Sea, “I do not like for him to waken me. It is as though I were inferior.” What has happened in the first sentence "I do not like for him to waken ...
5
votes
1answer
673 views

To (have / take) a swim

1. I'm going for a swim. 2. I'm going to have a swim. 3. I'm going to take a swim. Are the last two sentences correct? I know the first one is, but what about the last two? I know that you can use '...
5
votes
2answers
579 views

what to use the moment after you die in a game?

I died OR I have died which one should be used the moment after dying in a game?
5
votes
1answer
15k views

“I am a student of / in / at / by the Example University”?

What preposition is the right one to use in this example: I am a student of / in / at / by the Example University.
5
votes
5answers
912 views

The indefinite article with a repeated noun

Could you help me please with a sentence: When you called me I was reading a book. You know, I was reading a/the book because I had nothing to do. Is it grammatical within this context to say "a ...
5
votes
1answer
2k views

Can an adjective follow “more than”?

I came across a weird sentence in a paper. I wonder if its phrasing is correct grammatically since it doesn't make much sense to me. Since 1991, the number of children with a mother in prison ...
5
votes
2answers
1k views

What is the definition of “in and of…”

What does "in and of..." mean in the sentence below? While resource scarcity in and of itself is not considered a major factor in igniting conflict... How is it different if I just change it to "...
5
votes
1answer
4k views

Difference between as was expected and as was to be expected

Please tell me what is the difference between as was expected and as was to be expected below. A good many proposals were raised by the delegates, as was expected. A good many proposals were raised ...
5
votes
1answer
328 views

“will have avoided” vs. “will avoid” in the following context

Example with a context: Asked if France would join the United States in providing such equipment to the Ukrainian military, Hollande said "the option of negotiation, of diplomacy, cannot be ...
5
votes
5answers
1k views

I haven`t learned it for one year VS I haven`t learned it in a year

there~ I hope you could help me with these^^ I haven`t learned it for one year. I haven`t learned it in a year. What is the differece?? I haven`t practiced playing basketball for one year....
5
votes
3answers
364 views

Be my private tutor vs act as my private tutor

Given that a girl wants a private tutor, but she does not understand the difference between these two sentences: I hope you can be my private tutor at night after my day school is over. I hope ...
5
votes
3answers
33k views

No matter how - with a verb or without?

Is it OK not to use a verb after "no matter" like in sentences 2 and 3? 1) No matter how hard your life is you need to go on. 2) No matter how hard your life you need to go on. 3) You need to go on ...
5
votes
2answers
4k views

Why do I have to say “want you to do” instead of “want you do”?

I'm confused about 'want you to do (something)' and 'want you do (something)'. Example: "I want you to eat fish" instead of "I want you eat fish" or "I want that you eat fish". Can anyone ...
5
votes
2answers
846 views

Is “which are” omitted from this sentence?

I have a sentence here: Software quality assurance is a planned and systematic pattern of all actions necessary to provide adequate confidence that an item or product conforms to established ...
5
votes
2answers
62 views

Is this the same? 'run me out' and 'run out on me'

Could you explain word-usage of 'run me out'. I think it means the same as 'You can't just run out on her.' What verbs work in the same ways? I mean - Are there some general rules in gramma about ...
5
votes
2answers
202 views

What is wrong with this sentence: So then, there are more boys than girls in your class?

Why is this sentence correct: So then, are there more boys than girls in your class? And why is this sentence incorrect: So then, there are more boys than girls in your class? I would say that ...
5
votes
3answers
250 views

Is “hitching” an adjective in “tying … to the hitching rail”?

...then, tying the horse to the hitching rail... What is the function of "hitching" here? I initially thought it was an adjective, but could not find a translation in any dictionary indicating that ...
5
votes
4answers
25k views

We each has/have?

I'm confused by the following sentences: Each of us has a laptop. We each have a laptop. How can I intuit the differences between the two sayings? Why is it "we each have" rather than "...
5
votes
3answers
35k views

Two years and a half, two years and half,…?

When I looked up the word "half", I've found "two and a half year" is a correct phrase. But I've seen some Americans use "two years and (a) half" quite often and it confuses me. Is it correct to use ...
5
votes
2answers
32k views

The final exams “have started”, “have been started” or “are started”?

It kinda confuses me; so I wanted it to be cleared out for me: Is it the final exams have started the final exams have been started or the final exams are started Which one is the correct form and ...
5
votes
2answers
2k views

pay for the library card vs pay (without for) the library card

Happy New Year my friends! I have just received a letter from my school librarian on the stroke of 00:00. He asked me if I had paid for the library card. Given that context, what is the difference ...
5
votes
1answer
211 views

“calculus” and “the calculus” - what's the difference?

Example: Now, if you picked up the book and looked through it, the first thing you'd notice is that it was presented in the imposing format that the ancient mathematician Euclid had used in his ...
5
votes
1answer
554 views

Inversion - {subject complement} {form of 'be'} {subject}

In The Independent I found this sentence: More substantially dealt with is a suggestion, repeated over the phone by an Estonian minister to EU foreign affairs chief Cathy Ashton, that the snipers ...
5
votes
1answer
153 views

Word order. Is that two sentences differ?

What words order is better: This may not be her plan, but then again it might be so. or This may not be her plan, but then it might be so again. If it helps, I am trying translate this ...
5
votes
1answer
175 views

A usage of verb “prefer”

I am Korean English learner:) This is a sentence from TOEFL. I prefer spending time with just a few friends to hanging out with a large group since one can cultivate more profound relationships ...
5
votes
3answers
237 views

How does the word “screaming” modify the verb phrase “come out”?

I cannot see a certain syntactic structure of the sentence: "The parents come out barefoot and screaming, ready to buy ice-cream." How does the word "screaming" modify the verb phrase "come out"(...
5
votes
1answer
2k views

Change to passive voice

Please explain how to change this interrogative sentence into passive voice. Is he the musician for the evening?
5
votes
3answers
103k views

“My son and I are…” or “am…”? [closed]

My son and I are your fans. My son and I am your fans. Which is correct?
5
votes
2answers
1k views

a reason or the reason

He bought the house with a big backyard. This combination tells the listener which specific house he bought. He bought a house with a big backyard. This combination tells the listener what kind ...
5
votes
2answers
22k views

What is the difference between “get surprised” and “be surprised”?

I am confused in using the noun 'surprise': "If I tell you the truth, you'll be surprised" AND "If I tell you the truth, you'll get surprised." Do we use 'be surprised' and 'get surprised' in ...
5
votes
3answers
745 views

Grammatical structure of “goodness knows where”

I encountered the following sentence (1). (1) She came up from goodness knows where. I wonder at the grammatical structure of "goodness knows where." This phrase is used as a noun clause, but ...
5
votes
3answers
35k views

'more preferred' versus 'preferable'

Which of the following two sentences is correct? a) Which of the two boxes is preferable ? b) Which of the two boxes is more preferred? I think it should be a) because Oxford dictionary ...
5
votes
2answers
20k views

What is the difference between “to get”, “ to take” and “to pick”? [closed]

When I should use "to get", "to take" and "to pick"? Who answer can put a few examples? Thanks.
5
votes
3answers
869 views

The Z of A and B: plural or singular

This question is similar to this one, but it does not help me, so I am asking it by myself. I want to know which one is appropriate: The number of coins in bottle A and bottle B is compared. ...
5
votes
1answer
9k views

I have stayed vs I stayed

I never really understood if there is any difference between those sentences: I have stayed at the hotel I stayed at the hotel I have never had any problem with him I never had any problem with him ...
5
votes
2answers
2k views

Two of it? Is it correct to say it?

As I was talking to one of my friends, I said this sentence. We will need two of it. I said it looking at the only glass cup I had. I was preparing for the party. Two of it struck me as extremely ...
5
votes
1answer
301 views

pronouns as subjects or objects

I did a test in a session Test Your Grammar, in Word Power Made Easy by Lewis. 1) No one but (she, her) ever made a perfect score on the test 2) I can't remember (who, whom) it was. 3) ...
5
votes
2answers
1k views

“So much of X” or “So much X”

When I was speaking, I said, "There is so much of administration to do." Someone said to me that I have to say it as "There is so much administration to do." Is she correct? Why can't I say, "so much ...
5
votes
2answers
6k views

How about someone do something?

Can "how about" be used in this way? I heard it in an episode of Grey's Anatomy: How about we don't talk to her anymore? Because from what I've learned after "how about" we're supposed to ...
5
votes
5answers
27k views

Out Of The Office, Outside The Office

A question about some phrases using "office": out of office out of the office outside the office Do they mean the same thing?
5
votes
2answers
121 views

“Hawaii is the island that plants are green all the year round.” Do native English speakers say like this?

"Hawaii is the island that plants are green all the year round." One English teacher I know- he's not a native English speaker- argues this sentence is grammatically okay since 'that' can replace ...
5
votes
1answer
2k views

“As follows”: Is “follow” here a verb or something else?

I failed to understand the grammatical structure in this pattern. The result is shown as follows: [Result] Is follow here a verb or something else? I don't know whether as do(es) is ...
5
votes
2answers
8k views

Is it impossible to say “I am busy on every Monday”

Is it impossible to say "I am busy on every Monday" ? I was told that it's not a grammatically correct sentence. Someone said "I am busy every Monday" is correct. Is it true? Why can't I use "On" ...