Questions tagged [grammar]

This tag is for grammar questions, but only if you're not certain what other tag to use. If possible, tag as tense, verb, articles, prepositions, or some other more specific tag or tags instead.

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In word order, Korean is: SOV language type OR SOV type language?

1) What of those orders are correct? What option terms can it have instead of just simplification name as "word order"? 2) Please say what of following examples are logically okay (normality does not ...
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1answer
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Tag question with “Not only . . . but also”

In case of "Not only . . . but also", the verb agrees with the second subject : Not only he but also I am intelligent. Can we use a tag question with this sentence? Not only he but also I am ...
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3answers
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Can I omit the subject directly in informal writing?

Can I just omit the subject directly in informal sentence,or I should omit it and start with ing? For example: (I) Sing in the middle of storms/ Singing in the middle of storms.
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Is the sentence, “BrE and AmE are varieties of what” grammatically correct?

In meaning of "in both varieties" I said Does "both varieties" refer to BrE and AmE? If yes, they are varieties of what? Simply, I could have said BrE and AmE are varieties of what? ...
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1answer
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Is it correct and natural to say “the video says” meaning that the presenter or people give some information?

Is it correct and natural to say the video says meaning that the presenter or people give some information? For example: The video says that it takes one a few years to learn how to play the piano. ...
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1answer
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Is “they had already ten children” wrong?

The following example is from the Longman Dictionary of Common Errors. It marks the first as wrong and the latter two as correct. ✗ They had already ten children and didn't want any more. ✔ ...
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3answers
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Does “were carried” have a passive structure, or is “carried” simply an adjective in this text?

At Hit the rolling Assyrian plain had come to an end, and the invading army had entered upon the low alluvium of Babylonia, a region of great fertility, intersected by numerous canals, which in some ...
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What is the meaning of “such as” in this sentence? [closed]

No difficulties had delayed the invaders but such as Nature had interposed to thwart them.
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Third-person pronouns for inanimate objects in the next sentence

What pronoun to put for inanimate objects in a new sentence (he/she/they) or (it)? For example: A rainbow appeared in the sky. She was very beautiful. or: A rainbow appeared in the sky. It was very ...
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1answer
27 views

What’s the difference between abide by law and abide by the law? What does the article the’ before the word law represent?

Is the phrase abide by law is correct? How to use articles after prepositions like by and in ?
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Whichever or which?

There is something that has been bothering me: the nuance between "Whichever and Which" For instance: Choose which/ever time that suits you best to talk to me Take which/ever of these ...
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1answer
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How do I make “live streamed at launch” logical when that launch was canceled?

In The event happened in the past. My interest is still there. "is" vs. "was" , I said SpaceX Demo-2 was scheduled for launch to the International Space Station on 27 May 2020. ...
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One of which being hand selected, by ____, as the _____

I am writing a very important personal statement for career progression. I started a few of my sentences to show examples of accomplishments with "One of which being" and when I had someone review it ...
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3answers
474 views

“Who” in this sentence

In this song of Hunger Games [The hanging tree], there's this part that seems odd to me: Are you coming to the tree, where they strung up a man they say who murdered three. Why is "Who" used here? ...
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1answer
27 views

Does “which” here mean “that”?

Does which here mean that? On the other hand, it is only fair to add that the Mr. Bell who occupied the house at that time was not a man of notorious character, and one would willingly concede ...
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27 views

Can I use “prefer” with “over”? [duplicate]

Based on Cambridge site, it is obviously more common to use "prefer + to" or "prefer + rather than" I prefer football rather than computer games. I prefer tea to coffee I have a habit to use "...
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1answer
26 views

Is this a comma rule? (Phrase, phrase, clause.)

This sentence doesn't need a comma after "heat": The stuffy heat made him nauseous. This needs one: The muggy air, stuffy heat, made him nauseous. Because we included "the muggy air." Is ...
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1answer
25 views

I haven't worked for 20 years

Do the following sentences mean the one after "=" ? I haven't worked for 20 years = It has been 20 years since I worked last. I haven't worked for only/just 20 years = I have worked for a ...
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When we can use“simple past or present perfect” to denote near past that just happed [closed]

When I can use "simple past" to denote near past or something just finished. Or when can I use "past perfect to do the same ?
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'is cause' vs. 'it causes'

In the grammar test below, Why option 3 is not correct? Only where market failure occurs ------ to worry, and even such failure may tend to excessive conservation. 1)is there perhaps cause (...
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17 views

Is it grammatical to use just “Because English” as a whole sentence?

A tutorial says Indicative mood: "if I was..." Subjunctive mood: "If I were..." Why? Because English! Is it grammatical to use just "Because English" as a whole sentence? If not, how do say it ...
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22 views

transitive or intransitive verb

A simple way to check whether a verb is transitive or intransitive is to ask the question what or whom after the verb. If you can answer what or whom then the verb is transitive otherwise it is not. ...
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1answer
12 views

can I omit repeated words in this sentence? [closed]

"I'm proud to see you, to have you and to touch you" or "I'm proud to see, have and touch you" Is it correct? can I omit words?
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1answer
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Is the sentence, “With more board configurations than there are atoms in the universe”, grammatically correct?

A post says With more board configurations than there are atoms in the universe, the ancient Chinese game of Go has long been considered a grand challenge for artificial intelligence. I understand ...
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28 views

Confused about the structure of the sentence

Let's look at the sentences. These are the things to sell. These are the things to be sold. Which one is correct? The first one sounds good. It seems that in the first sentence we are talking ...
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1answer
38 views

She and I are in different cities or she and I are in a different city

She and I are in different cities She and I are in a different city Which sentence is correct? I intuitively chose the first one until I saw the lyrics of the song 'Good as Gold' My heart ...
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2answers
27 views

*As* he finished his speech, the audience

As he finished his speech, the audience burst into applause. Doesn't "as" suggest the two actions happened simultaneously? But they could not happen simultaneously. The audience applauded as soon as ...
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16 views

Is it 'separatist-controlled territory' or 'separatists-controlled territory'?

Is it 'separatist-controlled territory' or 'separatists-controlled territory'? There're, at the same time, 'five-year-old (child)' and 'rights (group)', different patterns. I understand that 'right (...
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2answers
46 views

“The meanings of A and B are pretty much the same” vs. “The meaning of A and B is pretty much the same”

The words "lovely" and "wonderful" are synonyms. So, should I say The meanings of "lovely" and "wonderful" are pretty much the same or The meaning of "lovely" and "wonderful" is pretty much the ...
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1answer
15 views

“in three days” VS “For three days”

Can anyone please explain the difference between these two sentences 1) I've not slept in three days. 2) I've not slept for three days. I hear people using the both sentences. I'm just curious if ...
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What is the difference between following? [duplicate]

Walk to Walk over/up to Do they mean the same thing? I've noticed walk to is used for place And walk over/up to is used for people
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1answer
48 views

“you already knew” vs. “you've already known”

A tutorial says we say that the manager told us more. That means you already knew something about this plan. It seems better to use present perfect tense here. ... That means you've already ...
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1answer
17 views

Refuses or Refuse

What if we get a Covid-19 vaccine and half the country refuses to take it? This is a sentence from Get ready for a vaccine information war New York Times My question is Can I use “refuse” in this ...
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2answers
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Can the same word be an “adjective” while also being a “determiner”?

I was curious, after asked this question by a student, to know what part of speech you would consider the word "my" in this sentence as: My book is that one. I browsed various dictionaries to ...
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1answer
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grammar rules for titles of posts [duplicate]

When referring to America, one should use the definite article, "the", "the United States". However, in some titles of posts, the definite article is omitted. Is that some kind of grammar rule?
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1answer
26 views

“Actually, he's just…” or “Actually, he just…”?

A: How's it going with you and Toby? B: Great. Actually, he's just moved in with me. Can I say "Actually, he's just..." or should it just be "he"?
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1answer
18 views

Should I add 'of' after gerunds?

Should I add 'of' after gerunds to introduce an object? For example, which one is correct: The advent of social media has had a huge impact on sharing information. or The advent of social media ...
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2answers
29 views

Is the sentence “What social problems exist in big cities” grammatically correct?

An English class use this as the topic for students. What social problems exist in big cities Typically, to construct a wh-question, one needs to use an auxiliary verb, such as "do/does", which ...
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1answer
31 views

I’m not having any free time today

Can I say the below sentence? Is it correctly? I'm sorry I’m not having any free time today. Or are there other better constructions? TIA
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28 views

When do I use a comma before a pronoun?

I'm writing a report about a book. One of the sentences reads "The Outsiders is a book written by Susan Eloise Hinton, who is more commonly known by her pen name of S. E. Hinton." At the word "who", ...
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1answer
33 views

Seventy minus one [closed]

I was watching a series and came across a dialogue which was, “I would love to “af you see kay” you in 70 minus 1”. What does 70 minus 1 mean here? Is it an idiom?
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37 views

“Would” and “likely” together

1) Would a fatally ill person be likely to sleep with the window open on a freezing cold night? I suppose that modal would in this case has the same meaning that word likely. Why both this words ...
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0answers
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BEING a responsible worker

Can I use 'being' in the following ways? “Being a responsible worker I can not let this happen.” “You shouldn't talk to him like that being his employee.” Do they make sense and sound natural?
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1answer
38 views

He's bound to be suspicious

Why phrase 'He's bound to be suspicious' can be translated by two opposite meanings? He simply has to be suspicious. (look like a suspicious character) He will probably suspect something.
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0answers
18 views

Reconstruction of a sentence

Is it grammatically correct to construct a sentence in this way: I assure you to have fed the cat before my leaving for London / I assure you to have fed the cat before my leaving for work this ...
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1answer
12 views

Differences between the two phrases

When and how should I use the phrases “suddenly realized” and “suddenly realize” ? What are the differences between them? Thanks a bunch!
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1answer
41 views

“I feel stress easily” vs. “I feel stressed easily”

I am informed that "feel" could be a linking verb and that "stressed" is an adjective. So, "feel stressed" would be grammatically correct. Are these two both correct? I feel stressed easily. I ...
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1answer
15 views

“use Harry as example” vs. “use Harry as the example” vs. “use Harry as an example”

Alice asks Michael an English grammar question. Michael is trying to give an example to explain that, so Michael says let's use Harry as example let's use Harry as the example let's use ...
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1answer
18 views

Fall in/fall into/fall to

The crewmen fell into the sea as the ship was rocked by a sunken rock. The crewmen fell in the sea as the ship was rocked by a sunken rock. The crewmen fell to the sea as the ship was rocked by a ...
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1answer
16 views

I have done something since 2018. (present perfect with SINCE)

I have three sentences below. Does the first and second sentences mean this state of being a member or living continues up to now? I started to be a member of XXX Club in 2018, and now I am still a ...

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