Questions tagged [grammar]

This tag is for grammar questions, but only if you're not certain what other tag to use. If possible, tag as tense, verb, articles, prepositions, or some other more specific tag or tags instead.

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61 votes
10 answers
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Great Expectations [is written vs has been written] by Charles Dickens

I had a grammar quiz at the university today. One of the questions was: "Great Expectations" ____ by Charles Dickens. a) is written b) has been written c) was written Undoubtedly, the ...
Andrew Tobilko's user avatar
33 votes
8 answers
6k views

Does “you can go now” sound rude? Context provided in question

As an IT guy in a college, I was helping a professor with his phone problems. After I was done helping him, I told him “you can go now.” to end the interaction as I had another student waiting for my ...
mathdummies's user avatar
31 votes
5 answers
10k views

Why is “deal 6 damage” a legit phrase?

I mean, if damage is countable, it should be Deal 6 damages. If it’s not countable, then this sentence should be wrong. Such as saying something like I drank 5 water. So... am I missing ...
Hao Wu's user avatar
  • 783
30 votes
3 answers
11k views

Why is it correct to say "me busy."?

I was playing Warcraft. I clicked on my peon. He told me: "me busy. leave me alone." Why is it OK to say it that way instead of just "I'm busy."?
Snack Exchange's user avatar
30 votes
9 answers
9k views

Does the English language have a grammatical gender?

If we are talking about animate objects, like people and animals, defining a gender is easy in most cases. But for inanimate objects, like a chair, a tree, the sky and so on, gender can be a built-in ...
Denis Kulagin's user avatar
27 votes
6 answers
6k views

Why should "are" be used here instead of "is"?

The sentence given in our book is as follows, More important than winning is developing the ability to work with others and developing leadership skills We are supposed to find where the mistake ...
Hassan Ashas's user avatar
25 votes
4 answers
7k views

"You better did" - is this acceptable?

Consider this example: John: Did you go to church today? James: Yes I Did John: You better did My confusion is the use of and correctness of the the last response, "you better did." ...
user5664's user avatar
  • 437
23 votes
7 answers
6k views

Is "The life is beautiful" incorrect or just very non-idiomatic?

We had a discussion earlier on another SE site and I'm not able to find a definitive answer online. If I say, speaking generally: The life is beautiful I know this is not the common way of saying ...
Laurent S.'s user avatar
23 votes
6 answers
6k views

Should it be "IS" or "ARE"? --- "The only thing we haven't seen ARE locusts."

This is from an article published on CNBC: "The only thing we haven't seen are locusts, said CEO Jim McCann in an interview." CNBC-A rose is still a rose The subject of the sentence is "...
Yunus's user avatar
  • 7,329
23 votes
2 answers
96k views

Most of something is plural or singular?

I am writing a literature review. My question is which sentence is correct? Most of the existing work focus on... Most of the existing work focuses on ... Most of the existing studies focus on ... ...
T D Nguyen's user avatar
22 votes
2 answers
3k views

Strange omission of "to be": "The ground was hard and the rime thick and crisp on the grass."

I encountered this sentence in Cambridge Dictionary: The ground was hard and the rime thick and crisp on the grass. I can't figure it out why there's no any verb after "the rime". It just ...
George Glebov's user avatar
20 votes
8 answers
7k views

Is it OK to say "a cat is on the table"?

I've been confused with the "there is/are" expression. I learnt at school that "A cat is on the table" is an awkward sentence and you should say "There is a cat on the table&...
kuwabara's user avatar
  • 1,468
20 votes
1 answer
4k views

Why is "university" not capitalised here?

Why is "university" not capitalised in the second sentence below? The Guardian: West Virginia University suspends fraternities and sororities after student lands in intensive care unit. The ...
Costa's user avatar
  • 1,169
20 votes
8 answers
9k views

"My boss was furious with me and I have been fired" vs. "My boss was furious with me and I was fired"

I have a question and I hope you can help me. I've been learning English for many years but I'm still struggling with the difference between simple past and present perfect. For example this sentence ...
Heda's user avatar
  • 213
20 votes
4 answers
2k views

Can vehicles sell themselves? Shouldn't it be passive voice?

I read one sentence About 170,000 of those vehicles sell each year in the U.S. It is extracted from: The large vehicle is part truck and part car. Strength and size combined with comfort. ...
Vince's user avatar
  • 695
19 votes
4 answers
499k views

Is it disappointed with, in, or by?

Are all of those words used? How does the meaning of the sentence change when either one is used instead of the others? 1.I was disappointed with/by my result. 2.I am disappointed with/by/in you/him/...
Vaibhav Sharma's user avatar
19 votes
3 answers
56k views

"Thanks for sharing this" - why isn't it "Thanks for having shared this" ?

People often answer "Thanks for sharing this" when I share a document or information with them. What I don't understand is why they don't use a past tense since I share the document before their ...
psql's user avatar
  • 291
17 votes
7 answers
6k views

Why does "money" take "the" in "all the money in the world"?

"All the money in the world " , in this sentence we talk about money in general , right ? I've read a book that says if we're talking about things in general we do not use "the". So why "the money" ?
isac's user avatar
  • 177
17 votes
6 answers
7k views

why "American-born", not "America-born"?

I tried but failed to wrap my head around the grammar for the term "American-born" (and all other similar expressions - "Canadian-born", "French-born", ...etc). Is it a set phrase or is there some ...
B Chen's user avatar
  • 1,216
17 votes
2 answers
228k views

'In' the past few years Vs 'Over' the past few years

Which preposition goes better with the below statement? 1: In the past few years I have learnt a lot about super cars. 2: Over the past few years I have learnt a lot about super cars.
Frank's user avatar
  • 425
16 votes
5 answers
3k views

What is Latin Grammar?

Another product of the eighteenth century was the invention of "English grammar". As English came to replace Latin as the language of scholarship, it was felt that one should also be able to control ...
gaoxinge's user avatar
  • 495
16 votes
8 answers
152k views

What is the difference between "being" and "having been" in this context?

Being a teacher, she likes children. AND Having been a teacher, she likes children. What is the difference between these two?
nima's user avatar
  • 5,817
15 votes
1 answer
94k views

Can "all" be used with both singular & plural verbs?

Are both sentences below correct? 1. All of the books are expensive. 2. All of the books is expensive.
user avatar
14 votes
3 answers
5k views

What does "I am all stomach" mean?

What does I am all stomach mean? A: ‘’It’s my turn for a gift. I would like to take you to lunch. To my favorite spot.’’ B: ‘’I am all stomach, professor!’’ Lonely Man Full of Love
Aseel's user avatar
  • 189
14 votes
4 answers
12k views

Difference between "I like swimming" and "I like to swim"?

So what is the difference between "I like swimming" and "I like to swim"? Do they mean the same?
Rifpan Afriansyah's user avatar
14 votes
5 answers
8k views

Why is it "you lied TO me" and not "you lied me"

Why do we say You tricked me You fooled me You deceived me You offended me You kissed me And so on and so on BUT you lied TO me and not you lied me?
user165427's user avatar
14 votes
3 answers
2k views

What's the meaning of "has by"?

She tries not to react but knows she has by the smirk on Frank’s face, the threat in the not-so-veiled statement plain. It seems to me as an unusual structure. Could you please explain it to me? ...
Peace's user avatar
  • 5,154
14 votes
3 answers
3k views

What is the difference between "Wasn't it supposed to have started 30 minutes ago?" and "Wasn't it supposed to start 30 minutes ago?" in this case?

If I want to ask my teacher if the lesson should have started earlier, Could I use the sentences below? 1 Wasn´t it supposed to have started 30 minutes ago? 2 Wasn´t it supposed to start 30 ...
coolguy's user avatar
  • 957
14 votes
4 answers
7k views

"on its way" vs. "in its way"

Is “the fire consumed everything on its way” correct? I thought "on its way" and "in its way" were pretty much equivalent in English and meant pretty much the same thing except in very rare cases. Am ...
Sayaman's user avatar
  • 13.5k
14 votes
6 answers
17k views

What is meant by "grammar"?

Some people equate grammar with any rules governing the language. Some people believe grammar is language itself minus whatever is being discussed in the shade of "meaning" and "comprehension". Some ...
M.A.R.'s user avatar
  • 7,351
14 votes
2 answers
39k views

"he leaves for New York tomorrow". vs. "he will leave for New York tomorrow"

Which one is grammatically correct? I don't know when he leaves for New York tomorrow. or I don't know when he will leave for New York tomorrow Is it correct to use the future form of the ...
user32733's user avatar
  • 141
13 votes
9 answers
4k views

Is the word "here" unnecessary in this sentence: "Hi, Bob the Canadian here"?

The following is the first sentence from a native speaker's video on Youtube about leaning English. He says: "Hi, Bob the Canadian here, let's learn English at the grocery store." He is ...
Yunus's user avatar
  • 7,329
13 votes
3 answers
2k views

Why not use "casualties" in "Small shops have been a casualty of the recession."?

From the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary: Small shops have been a casualty of the recession. "Shops" is plural here while "casualty" is singular. Any reason for that? Can I have the sentence ...
A Learner's user avatar
  • 719
13 votes
2 answers
2k views

unusual usage of bellowing

Explosions shook the ground, artillery shells, mortars and bombs continuously rained down, fires blazed, and smoke bellowed high into the sky. Doesn't bellowing mean "make a loud sound"? If that'...
Sayaman's user avatar
  • 13.5k
13 votes
4 answers
4k views

Has GOOD become an acceptable adverb?

I'm a native English speaker. On a site where I help Russians with English, one of them wrote the sentence: My watch has been working good since I fixed it. Naturally, I pointed out that the ...
CocoPop's user avatar
  • 6,673
13 votes
2 answers
7k views

Some of you will have met me before vs Some of you met me before

I really do not get how "will" and past infinitive is used here. This comes from an example in a textbook, explaining usage of will in assumptions: Some of you will have met me before. I wonder, ...
John V's user avatar
  • 1,645
13 votes
3 answers
27k views

"Product list" vs "Products list"

I have a page with list of products. What is the correct name for this page? Product list or Products list And What's difference?
rnofenko's user avatar
  • 233
13 votes
1 answer
100k views

In the other hand or on the other hand

What is the difference between the following? Also, if both: in the other hand and on the other hand are correct. And what is the reason?
Mohamad Mahmoud Darwish's user avatar
12 votes
2 answers
6k views

"as much details as you can remember"

A: I don't remember much, though. B: Just try to give me as much details as you can remember. I feel like something is wrong in B's sentence. I've never heard people say something like this.
ssd smg's user avatar
  • 125
12 votes
6 answers
23k views

How do I start a sentence with a date?

I want to say: August 22, 2012, the day my life changed forever and the day I met you. My only problem is that I don't know how to start a sentence with a date. If someone could help me with this ...
Leah's user avatar
  • 121
12 votes
4 answers
2k views

"What does prevent x from doing y?" OR "What prevents x from doing y?"

Do you say: What does prevent x from doing y? OR What prevents x from doing y? My gut tells me it's the latter, but I can't explain it. It's just a feeling. What I'd like to know is what the ...
squid's user avatar
  • 274
12 votes
6 answers
4k views

I need to rewrite this sentence while keeping the same meaning and starting with the given word(s)

Paul and Jane moved to Paris two years ago. It is... If the starting words were "it has" I could have written "It has been two years since...". But the auxiliary "be" is used instead and I ...
user avatar
12 votes
4 answers
14k views

Is "too few" equivalent to "not enough"?

Kindly, consider the image below: Can I say for the glass in the middle: "too few water" instead of "not enough water"? Are they equivalent in meaning?
Laith Leo's user avatar
  • 595
12 votes
1 answer
2k views

What does this sentence on BBC means: ""All baa myself: Is this Britain's loneliest sheep?"

All baa myself: Is this Britain's loneliest sheep? BBC - Britain's loneliest sheep What does "All baa myself" mean? I couldn't quite understand it.
Yunus's user avatar
  • 7,329
12 votes
4 answers
4k views

Can we use "no" and then say an affirmative sentence to a yes/no question?

Take this question. Do you have two brothers? For short answers we can say" no,I don't and for long answers we should say " No I don't have two brothers Can I answer "No, I have 3 brothers."
Masih K's user avatar
  • 1,101
12 votes
2 answers
2k views

"JUST" or "EVEN"? "These days it is expensive to take care of just one child."

"These days it is expensive to take care of just one child." When I read the sentence, I understand the point, however, I think "just" might be ambiguous here, so I think that ...
Yunus's user avatar
  • 7,329
12 votes
2 answers
143k views

What is the difference between "I was there" and "I have been there"?

In our language, the difference between the two sentences is very vague. What is the difference between "I was there" and "I have been there"?
Dasik's user avatar
  • 2,409
12 votes
2 answers
9k views

"many a time" means "many times"?

I never saw anyone work as hard as he did, many a time I saw him on the weekends working to his highest standards to give the best research he could give. From the context, I understand many a time ...
Juya's user avatar
  • 2,576
12 votes
2 answers
73k views

'all of which' vs. 'any one of which' vs. 'each of which'

1) ... if you tried to compare can't with cannot and can not, all of which are distinct in English, you'd end up ... 2) ... if you tried to compare can't with cannot and can not, any one of which ...
user avatar
12 votes
2 answers
3k views

What is the difference between 'stand' and 'take a stand'? [closed]

1.You had to take a stand. 2.You had to stand. What is the difference between 'stand' and 'take a stand' in meaning?
박용현's user avatar
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