Questions tagged [grammar]

This tag is for grammar questions, but only if you're not certain what other tag to use. If possible, tag as tense, verb, articles, prepositions, or some other more specific tag or tags instead.

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your many books, Those some people - can we use determiners this way?

I have your many books. I have many books of yours. Those some people are about to come. Some of those people are about to come. I know that the 2nd version of each example is correct but I don't ...
hwkal's user avatar
  • 487
0 votes
2 answers
34 views

relative adverb '' where ''?

In the Oxford Practice Grammar book there is a statement like this: We usually try to put relative clauses immediately after the noun phrases they describe. But we can include a preposition phrase ...
emilywenly's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
43 views

A questionable use of colon in this context

I encountered the following strange sentence on this page: Traditionally, websites are less like "something the user has" and more like "somewhere the user visits". Typically, a ...
Lerner Zhang's user avatar
  • 3,481
0 votes
0 answers
22 views

The rule of adding a prepositional complementary phrase to a clause

We can see that sole parents and their children were most likely to live in poverty, with a poverty rate of around 21%. In the above sentence, is the bolded phrase, including the comma, grammatical? ...
Ken Adams's user avatar
  • 863
0 votes
2 answers
75 views

Error correction about modality

Error correction: They say it (1)can (2)be going to rain so you (3)should take an umbrella or you (4)might get wet. In this sentence, choose a phrase (1,2,3,4) and change it so that the new sentence ...
ChemistryLearner's user avatar
23 votes
6 answers
6k views

Should it be "IS" or "ARE"? --- "The only thing we haven't seen ARE locusts."

This is from an article published on CNBC: "The only thing we haven't seen are locusts, said CEO Jim McCann in an interview." CNBC-A rose is still a rose The subject of the sentence is "...
Yunus's user avatar
  • 7,329
0 votes
0 answers
21 views

Past simple tense

He told me that the meeting was in the hall before I had even framed the question. Could I change above explanation as follow He told me that the meeting was in the hall before I even framed the ...
Thamilay's user avatar
  • 197
1 vote
1 answer
28 views

"Who" and "When" next to each other. ---- "I was waiting at the airport when who should come along but Mr Pettigrew!

"I was waiting at the airport when who should come along but Mr Pettigrew!" cambridge dictionary-come along The part of the sentence ".....when who....." has caught my eye. This is ...
Yunus's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
15 views

Past perfect tense example

I passed high-school in 16 years old and later I joined Army. When I was 21 years old I had been an officer. Could I use past perfect as completed action above when I was 21 years old I had been an ...
Thamilay's user avatar
  • 197
1 vote
1 answer
32 views

"And this increased exposure to the outside world." --- Would you doubt this is a sentence?

The following is from a documentary about a dog, and how her owner's taking her to the park regularly has affected it. And you hear this: "And this increased exposure to the outside world." ...
Yunus's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
33 views

When to use "was coming" or "would come"?

You went to a party with your friends, you arrived by car and your friend arrived by bus. It was very late at the end of the party and you were driving your friend home. He said: It was really kind ...
user avatar
9 votes
1 answer
1k views

What is the doctor saying in this sentence? Neither subtitles nor my ear can get it correct :(

This is from a British TV show, a patient who fell off the bike and hurt her leg is at the doctor's office. Hospital visit (6:49-6:55) The doctor says something looking at her arm, but neither the ...
Yunus's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
132 views

Conditional sentences and usages

If I were born in 1984 my name would have been thamilay. If I were born in 1984 my name would be thamilay now. Which sentence is wrong. Correct me!
Thamilay's user avatar
  • 197
2 votes
1 answer
33 views

Should it be "....could marry..." or "....could have married...? --- If you didn't like me when you met me, how the hell could you marry me?

Imagine a husband says to his wife -after years of marriage- that he didn't like her all along ever since when they first met. So, the wife gets shocked and wants to ask how he married her. So, the ...
Yunus's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
25 views

Is it ok to use "NOW" - instead of "JUST"- in a simple past tense sentence?

Somebody is cleaning and dusting away with a feathery thing in his hand. When he finished cleaning a table where people were sitting at, he said: I finished here now. The use of "now" in ...
Yunus's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
38 views

'But then', 'but then again', 'then again' - same as 'although'?

I am confused about those but then, but then again and then again. Can I use them interchangeably? What I understand is those are similar as although. Can I use them as although when I translate ...
Thamilay's user avatar
  • 197
-2 votes
1 answer
33 views

Am I right about the differences between can and could?

Does “can” mean possibility while “could means probability? For example, Example 1 A: I don’t like those statues. They are blocking the gate. B: Well, they can be removed. Most of them weigh only 20 ...
Chien Te Lu's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
38 views

How do you feel ? and How are you feeling?

Why a state verb FEEL is used in How are you feeling? question? I know it has also a dynamic meaning - touch or exemine -but in this question the meaning is different, in`t it
Tatiana Kirova's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
89 views

Why does this native english speaker on TV use Present Perfect in her sentence that contains "years ago"? --- "She has given up years ago."

This native english speaker is telling about how she has quit 40-year habit of smoking. She says: "Linda, my sister, used to smoke. She has given up years ago, years ago." ITV-Coleen quit 40-...
Yunus's user avatar
  • 7,329
0 votes
1 answer
33 views

Is the following sentence structure grammatical: S1 + V1, and Ving?

At first, when I was writing the intro for this IELTS question, it went: The line chart illustrates the proportion of New Zealand’s population growth in different age groups from 1950 to 2000 and ...
an IELTS learner's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
18 views

Participle Clause as Attribute or Other Than This?

In the below sentence, does the participle clause "coming together to find their love for each other" work as attribute for "two broken people" or other than this? It (Swan Lake) ...
Kevin Cheng's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
37 views

"Mix it round." vs "Mix it."

Someone is showing how to make a cake. And after putting the ingredients into a bowl, there comes this sentence: Mix it round. Tweenies (see 8:05-8:10) I, a non-native English speaker, wouldn't ...
Yunus's user avatar
  • 7,329
3 votes
1 answer
62 views

Is the past tense “rose” correct here?

In the following extract from a CNBC article, the author uses the expression “economists expect that prices….rose”. The usage of the past tense sounds a bit queer to me. I think “should rise ” or “...
Mr. Black's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
55 views

Is the structure, "adj. + v. + adj.", grammatically correct?

Actually, I'm titling the manuscript of my academic research. I wonder if I use something like "Temporal Meets Spatial: XXXXXX" or "Static Meets Dynamic: XXXXXXX" to be the title, ...
rlgain's user avatar
  • 3
2 votes
4 answers
139 views

Your being flatchested?

I saw this discussion on Quora and am surprised. Should it really be Cousin, I didn’t bring up your being flat-chested and not you're?
d-b's user avatar
  • 195
3 votes
2 answers
60 views

Using word who with phrases

Can we say "I saw my friend who was parking his car." ? Or is it correct to say "I saw my friend parking his car." ? If both of them are correct so in the second one the relative ...
Amir Dashti's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
84 views

Can “of" be removed from "of whose" in this sentence?

I once knew a former woman of easy virtue of whose past life there remained only a daughter who was almost as beautiful as the mother had once been, from The Lady of the Camellias. This is my ...
MT MTESK's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
35 views

Understanding the Inclusion of "of" and its Impact on Sentence Nuance

In the following sentence, I'm curious about why the "of" is not omitted in "of the ABO blood groups." Additionally, I'm interested in understanding how the nuance of the sentence ...
Naoko's user avatar
  • 23
4 votes
6 answers
939 views

What does this sentence mean: "We got it closed into the pool gated area."

This is from the BBC, which mentions about an escaped kangaroo. It is kind of a large kangaroo. We got it closed into the pool gated area. Escaped kangaroo (see:00:06-00:11) The expression We got it ...
Yunus's user avatar
  • 7,329
2 votes
1 answer
105 views

Does "since [year]" include that year?

I had a disagreement with my Professor regarding the use of the word "since" in a few of our exam questions. The sentence was "dividends have not been paid since 2021". In ...
Niko's user avatar
  • 21
2 votes
1 answer
43 views

Using the short form of the verb 'to be' in continuous aspect

I'm wondering if it is okay to use a short form of "to be" after nouns, as in the sentences: "The women 're working", "The birds're singing".
Iza Lev's user avatar
  • 21
1 vote
1 answer
38 views

used to vs. simple past for past daily routines

I came across this video on Instagram where a teacher says this sentence is wrong: When I was a kid, I went to the gym every day. and must be replaced by: When I was a kid, I used to go to the gym ...
Englishfreak's user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
219 views

in the sentence '"You're absolutely right," agreed Jake,' does 'agree' functions as a transitive verb or an intransitive?

I'm ware that a transitive verb takes a direct object. in the sentence '"You're absolutely right," agreed Jake,' does 'agree' functions as a transitive verb or an intransitive? I asked GPT-3....
singularli's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
56 views

Is “as” used even with phrases?

I know that the question “as vs. like” was already asked, but in the book “The Elements of Style” the author explains: “Like—Not to be used for the conjugation ‘as.’ ‘Like’ governs nouns and pronouns; ...
Piermo's user avatar
  • 155
1 vote
2 answers
79 views

Proper tag question for "has to" and "have to"

What's the tag question for has to and have to? For example, Tom and Clarissa have to buy some groceries, ...?
Shahram's user avatar
  • 35
3 votes
1 answer
56 views

Can I have a question? When we can use Pair of, bunch of, set of,? [closed]

So I can not speak english very well and some days ago in my english class we were talking about this words, like bunch of flowers, pair of pyjamas, set of traffics light. And I had all question wrong ...
BTS ARMY's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
2k views

both of my parents are dead or both of my parents were dead

"Both of my parents are dead" or "both of my parents were dead"? Which example is grammatically correct? Are "are dead" and "were dead" the same or not?
Saraswati Dhakal's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
32 views

work/worked and know/known?

Normally, when we use stative verbs in perfect tense, we prefer simple perfect tense, not perfect continuous, and we know that they mean the same thing. I have worked here for 3 years. or I have been ...
emilywenly's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
38 views

He hasn’t worked for years?

What does the sentence '' He hasn't worked for years '' actually tell us? He hasn't worked for years. ( ... still doesn't work ) He hasn't worked for years. ( until now ) but now he will ?
emilywenly's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
39 views

Is this sentence idiomatic: "It works best the earliest it is given."

A doctor tells about adrenaline pens on TV. He says: "It works best the earliest it is given." ITV-Adrenaline pens (see:8:26-8:30) As far as I understand, he means "The earlier it is ...
Yunus's user avatar
  • 7,329
-1 votes
1 answer
35 views

Are both sentences correct: "What did you react?" | "What did you react to?"

Imagine you have a friend, who had allergic reaction to a food yesterday. And you want to ask what food they reacted to yesterday. Can you simply say? - What did you react yesterday? Or should you ...
Yunus's user avatar
  • 7,329
1 vote
0 answers
34 views

Can or could ? Which one is better? [duplicate]

can or could? Which one should I choose in the examples below? Example 1 A: We have been trying to find the worst car in this country. B: Well, this is definitely the worst one that can/could be found....
Chien Te Lu's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
22 views

I’m confused if ‘from’ in this sentence necessary or I can omit it

There are two options to choose from for the add-on you want to build alongside a Science Facility in Starcraft 1. I’m confused if ‘from’ there is necessary or I can omit it. Besides: There are two ...
pheno8's user avatar
  • 427
0 votes
2 answers
35 views

Which one would you use when referring to the gas bill of "THOSE OF YOU": "THEIR bills" or "YOUR bills"

A presenter on TV advises people who struggle to pay their energy bills, and he says: "Please don't clog up their phone lines because they only have limited resources. That's for those of you who ...
Yunus's user avatar
  • 7,329
2 votes
1 answer
43 views

The worst thing he can be called

Which one is the correct? The worst thing he can be called is a coward. The worst thing he could be called is a coward. I think it's the second one because it's about possibility in the future; on ...
Chien Te Lu's user avatar
-1 votes
3 answers
81 views

What does this sentence mean: "It is not like those women would have looked at you twice before Christmas."

This is from famous British TV drama, the Eastenders, a man is saying to a woman: It is not like those women would have looked at you twice before Christmas. TV drama - Eastenders see: (0:44-0:48) I ...
Yunus's user avatar
  • 7,329
0 votes
2 answers
48 views

Did you see how fast he move or moved? [closed]

Which one is correct Did you see how fast he move? Or Did you see how fast he moved?
Ali's user avatar
  • 11
1 vote
1 answer
61 views

Isn't that ungrammatical?

The Reverend said I was to go back to my cot and I was not to eat supper for a week. Which I didn't eat supper anyway. from "The Education of Little Tree 영한대역 p594" If "which" is ...
inviolable's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
36 views

How to answer using "had better" form for a positive answer?

When give an answer using "had better" form, should we add the verb after "had better", such as: "Yes, we'd better study". or just to answer: "Yes, we'd better. &...
Mengyuan WEI's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
28 views

Place of a time expression in a negative sentence

Is it possible to put the time expressions before or after the negative word? Or is there only one way? For example : The students usually don't like eating fish The students don't usually like eating ...
שבי לוי's user avatar