Questions tagged [grammaticality]

Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of English grammar.

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How to introduce oneself in an job interview?

From a YouTube channel, I learned that during an introduction instead of saying "Myself (name)" one should say "My name is (name)." Though I do not consider the latter one wrong, I ...
Krishn Pandey's user avatar
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2 answers
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About comparative degree

Are the following sentences grammatically correct? Sentence1: This book is not any more interesting than the one I read last week. Sentence2: This book is not interesting any more than the one I ...
桐山征爾's user avatar
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I can't understand the last line. What does the speaker want to say?

Graphic designers use a variety of design element to achieve artistic or decorative effects in print or electronic mediums to help determine the message, and the design should convey. Shouldn't it be: ...
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How to fill the blank in "Many of the world's great novels are reported ___ (make) into movies last year."?

I'm an English learner and came across an exercise question today: Sentence: Many of the world's great novels are reported ___ (make) into movies last year. Choices: made to be made to have been made ...
Nekomiya Kasane's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
101 views

Present, past simple and present perfect

This is an answer to this post. If recent: Michael has been warned from the moment he entered the factory that Andy is a local version of a grim reaper. He was warned because everyone has worked with ...
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Using not with both, either, neither: word choice when expressing negation of two options

In a sentence responding negatively to multiple statements or questions, which of the following ways sounds best and has the least grammatical error? He didn’t do both. He didn’t do either. He didn’t ...
NahZ1ky's user avatar
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1 answer
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When to use "was coming" or "would come"?

You went to a party with your friends, you arrived by car and your friend arrived by bus. It was very late at the end of the party and you were driving your friend home. He said: It was really kind ...
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Conditional sentences and usages

If I were born in 1984 my name would have been thamilay. If I were born in 1984 my name would be thamilay now. Which sentence is wrong. Correct me!
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Is use of 'gotten' correct in this sentence? [closed]

Has anybody gotten done pest control at their home?
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“It is a great deal!” vs “This is a great deal!” vs “That is a great deal!” vs “Those are a great deal!”

What’s the correct answer for the following question set? Speaker A: I’ll buy these rugs as a memento of our holiday. Speaker B: __________ a great idea! a. Those are (a great idea!) b. It’s (a ...
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Did you see how fast he move or moved? [closed]

Which one is correct Did you see how fast he move? Or Did you see how fast he moved?
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"friend and contemporary": pleonasm?

On the Adam Smith's Wikipedia page there is a picture of David Hume, with the caption: David Hume was a friend and contemporary of Smith's. Obviously, friend and contemporary are by no means ...
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Which of the following two sentences is grammatically correct, and why?

Sentence one: Has any of your employees been sick this week? Sentence two: Have any of your employees been sick this week?
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Starts of plagued or starts of plaguing

After a rigged vote, the new government starts off plagued by illegitimacy and a mounting financial crisis. After a rigged vote, the new government starts off plaguing by illegitimacy and a mounting ...
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5 answers
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Is it 'did you used to' or 'did you use to'?

What question do you consider: Grammatically incorrect but common 100% grammatically correct Wrong and not common? What games or activities did you used to play during recess or after school? What ...
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A weird use of "could have" in a non-hypothetical situation

I saw a sentence in a book that I am reading now. That seems very weird to me and I need clarification. All this happened between sunrise and sunset, the boy thought. He was feeling sorry for himself,...
cetinkaya's user avatar
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Specifying distance

Regarding description of relative position which one is right: the antenna is installed in 20cm distance from the beam center. the antenna is installed at 20cm from the beam center.
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I learned much of my English watching

I learned much of my English vocabulary watching Hollywood movies. I learned much of my English vocabulary from watching Hollywood movies. I learned much of my English vocabulary by watching Hollywood ...
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“They got nice cars” correct or not?

Yeah, some of them always got the nicest cars. Is this correct? “Got” doesn’t sound right to me, I would’ve said they have the nicest cars but does the above sentence still have correct grammar?
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Correct use of “treat”

My gf always refers to wet cat food as “treat”, as in she’ll say “I gave the cats treat”. This sounds grammatically incorrect to me, but I don’t know the exact reason why. I feel like the correct way ...
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2 votes
2 answers
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The Double Genitive with Animals?

Can I use the double possessive below as I would in, say, the phrase a friend of Bob’s? a bone of my dog’s a toy of my dog’s Are the phrases above, however awkward, still grammatical? Never mind ...
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Can "He is an honest man" be passivized?

My friend says that the sentence He is an honest man can be passivized. My English friends and I are saying that the sentence can’t be passivized since the verb is intransitive and there is no object ...
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1 answer
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"A too large dataset is difficult to learn" vs "If the dataset is too large, the learning is difficult"

I am writing an academic paper. I wrote the sentence "A too large dataset is difficult to learn". My colleague told me she felt that it was not a complete sentence, and it is better to ...
ZhangLiao's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
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"He thought his sister was/had been playing with his toys when he wasn't there"

Which of (1) and (2) is (or are) “correct”, and when and why? Yesterday Rachel said that she was practicing dancing two days ago. Yesterday Rachel said that she had been practicing dancing two days ...
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why is "wanting" grammatically incorrect, in this sentence?

Not seeing any video games the kids wanting and acknowledging we certainly don't need any of them, I continued browsing in the toy department. Why is wanting grammatically incorrect? I cannot figure ...
red beans's user avatar
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What's the correct future form? [duplicate]

Given the following sentence: Next month, Maggie ______(meet) her sister in Japan. Which one of these, "is meeting" and "is going to meet" is the suitable future form?
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Is the phrase "alone work" legitimate?

For the purpose of a cover letter, would it be legitimate to use the phrase "alone work" to describe your past professional activities that were conducted individually? Is it grammatically ...
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2 answers
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Is it grammatical? "I'm happy to a high degree"?

I want to use prepositional phrases instead of adverbs such as "very" and "so". Is it grammatical to say "I'm happy to a high degree"
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Can the prepositional phrase "at ease" be used with "very"?

https://ludwig.guru/s/very+at+ease According to this, "at ease" is used with "very", is it grammatical? I've learnt that "very" can be used only with adjectives and ...
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1 answer
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Uses of Neither.....nor

"The interior of the earth can be understood only by indirect evidences as neither any one has nor any one can reach the interior of the earth." This is a excerpt Fundamentals of Physical ...
Ansh's user avatar
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7 votes
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Is it correct to say "Be m a number...", instead of "Let m be a number..." in math and elsewhere?

I know declaring things with 'be' is common in older texts. Is it grammatically sound using it in this context? It doesn't have to be in math, but that is where I saw it once and have been writing it ...
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is a real world education grammatically correct? [closed]

Part-time work should be regarded as a real world education can I use “a” in front of education? Is the phrase “ a real-world education ”correct?
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Mixture of simple past and present in the same sentence

And it just recently awarded a million dollar contract that reeks of corruption. Is the above sentence grammatically correct? The word recently is used, which normally establishes a relation between ...
Mohit Jangra's user avatar
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A kind word and forgiveness II

Posting a new question to make things clear, to avoid confusion. Which one is grammatical? A kind word and forgiveness is good. A kind word and forgiveness are good.
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-2 votes
1 answer
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Is the following sentence correct and natural? [closed]

currently a second-year Master of Web Intelligence and Data Science's student Is the above grammatically correct and natural sounding? What is the difference between 'master of' and 'master's in' ? ...
Louardi Brahim's user avatar
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1 answer
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ambiguous relative clause '' who ''?

What does '' who '' refer to ? Is this sentence grammatically correct ? There was a friend of this woman, who loves me.
emilywenly's user avatar
4 votes
5 answers
280 views

Is "it" grammatically incorrect in "The chair was too small for him to sit on it"?

As the title suggests, would you consider the following sentence grammatically incorrect (not awkward, INCORRECT)? The chair was too small for him to sit on it. The sentence would make a better ...
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0 votes
2 answers
72 views

What do you think the reasons to not buy a car are (which) Jack has?

1 What do you think the reasons to not buy a car Jack has? 2 What do you think the reasons to not buy a car are (which) Jack has? 3 What do you think the reasons to not buy a car Jack has are? The ...
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Which statement is more correct, "is getting updated" or "is being updated"?

The parameters is getting updated when you change the project rate. The parameters is being updated when you change the project rate. Is there a difference between these two statements? Which ...
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-1 votes
2 answers
39 views

Is "New rules are adhere to" grammatically correct? [closed]

Today I learned several vocabs including "adhere to". Also the teacher said that "New rules are adhere to" is also grammatically correct and used normally. However, I think that it ...
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6 votes
4 answers
5k views

Why is "John makes Bob looks short." wrong?

In an imaginary situation where John is 200 cm tall and Bob 190 cm. Bob is still tall but at the side of John, he looks short. Why is "John makes Bob looks short." wrong? "Bob looks ...
Quora Feans's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
102 views

“the room whose door is broken” vs “the room which door is broken”? [duplicate]

Which exactly is the difference in meaning and usage between choosing whose versus choosing which in this first sentence? He chose to live in the room [ which / whose ] door was broken. How do these ...
Didyougo's user avatar
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1 answer
66 views

How is "make" used when talking about a type of car?

Those are all cars make Chevrolet. Those are all make Chevrolet cars. Those are all Chevrolet make cars. Are any of these syntactically correct English phrases?
cherry-noize's user avatar
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2 answers
127 views

Is it correct to say "I'm in my 24"?

I just want to know if it could be a correct form, for example, to use when it's someone's birthday.
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1 answer
64 views

What is correct (English grammar): Combination of singular/plural but is it was OR were?

Could someone please tell me what is correct: Shareholders’ ownership of ABC-Company was 1,000,000 shares, which equals 1.5% of equity. or Shareholders’ ownership of ABC-Company were 1,000,000 ...
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3 answers
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Correct usage of 'nostalgia'

How do I use the word nostalgia correctly? For example, say I saw an old doll of mine and it reminded me of when I was a kid; what would be the correct expression to describe that? I got nostalgia ...
Yusuf Bouzekri's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
69 views

What's the difference between "Spain's fastfood consumption" and "the consumption of fastfood in Spain"? [closed]

I am describing a chart in that chart 22% of Spanish people consumed fast food. Are the two sentences below correct? Is there a difference between these sentences in meaning? Spain's fast food ...
Rafeq's user avatar
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3 answers
82 views

Is "Please be submitted" grammatical?

Is it grammatically correct to write Please be submitted the monthly financial report. Instead of writing the following? I would like to make a monthly financial report.
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0 answers
70 views

Is it idiomatic to say someone is "obstinate about" something they don't want changed?

John is very obstinate about his choice of words. Above is a sentence I wrote about a person I know. He's a self-professed novelist who is very stubborn about his choice of words. When he wraps up a ...
Underwood's user avatar
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1 answer
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"in a way that somebody agrees is of a good enough standard or allowed" — Why is it grammatical to place “agrees” and “is” next to each other?

one of the meanings of "acceptably" from oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com: (1) ​acceptably - in a way that somebody agrees is of a good enough standard or allowed The two consecutive verbs &...
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