Questions tagged [grammaticality]

Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of English grammar.

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1answer
18 views

Is it right to use “how important” as a subject in this sentence? And what does it mean?

I wonder if it's correct to use “how + adj.” as a subject in a sentence, just the way I saw in the following sentence : “Everybody stay where you are. Chill out,” Quill said, slowly circling ...
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1answer
14 views

Using adjective before the word “something/someone”

We normally use these kinds of sentences: I need something strong or I have to hire someone intelligent. Here, the words "strong" and "intelligent" modify the nouns something and someone.So,we can ...
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3answers
39 views

Is 'telling' noun or participle on this sentence?

There is no telling where he has gone. In the above sentence, Is 'telling' noun or participle?
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10 views

Can the sentence be combined?

The cost of a tailored suit and the time required for a tailored suit...... Can the above be written as follow: The cost and time required for a tailored suit ...... The cost of and time ...
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32 views

Is “late by an hour” grammatical?

For example, I need to be at a place at 7:00, but got there at 8:00. Can I say "I got there late by an hour"? I know a more commonly used expression is "I was an hour late", but for now I only want to ...
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20 views

“He went ill and came back healthy” is it correct

I heard a man say: He went ill and came back healthy. Here ill and healthy are adjectives and qualify the subject, he. And the sentence structure is: sub + verb + adjective Is it ...
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1answer
16 views

Is “… we can already make…” grammatical?

the lecturer is saying we can already make two observations. it seems that already is used for perfect tense, so is this expression here grammatical?
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“I can't understand what does it mean.” vs “I can't understand what it means.”

My English skills are poor. Which of these is correct to say? "I can't understand what does it mean" or "I can't understand what it means".
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3answers
40 views

“Which is the best reason” vs “which the best reason is”

I was recently asked to decide: Which the best reason is for people to do exercise. Momentarily, I stopped in my tracks, I felt I should have been asked: Which is the best reason for people ...
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1answer
22 views

He prepared for school like he always does (or did?)

I think that the following sentence is grammatically incorrect: He prepared for school like he always does. Should it be more grammatical to say: He prepared for school like he always did. The ...
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1answer
23 views

Americans/Americans'/American mistrust in the world?

This research shows the Americans mistrust in the world. This research shows Americans' mistrust in the world. This research shows the American mistrust in the world. What is the difference ...
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1answer
31 views

Is it common/acceptable to use “the feeling of vulnerabilities”

Instead of saying I don't like to feel vulnerable, are the following acceptable too? I don't like the feeling of vulnerabilities. The feeling of vulnerabilities crippled me.
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1answer
65 views

Meanings and uses of the words “numerous” and “innumerable”

My question concerns proper use of the word numerous and of the word innumerable. I am in a problem which is rare: which one to choose even if I consult thesaurus. This is what I have learned so far: ...
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14 views

I want to add something in here

During a conversation, I want to add something to the discussion, if I say "I want to add something in here, ..." is it grammatical?
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18 views

Is 'reason being' grammatical?

Is the usage of 'reason being' ungrammatical? I heard so many times people use this. I don't know is this correct usage or not.
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18 views

Is “more of such examples” correct? [on hold]

Let us assume that in a text we bring an example. And we want to bring more similar examples. Is this statement grammatically correct? There are more of such examples How about the following: ...
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1answer
8 views

Using “NOT” to make a contrast

The criminals should be punished, not awarded medals. The criminals shouldn’t be awarded medals, but punished. Is there any grammatical mistake in these sentences I am just being doubtful of ...
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1answer
20 views

Is mixing future and past tense in this sentence correct?

'It will take a while to locate a paperwork for 2 years ago' I think this sentence sounds weird, future tense and past tense are mixed. Is this sentence correct?
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Usage of acquaint

Someone has just told me (as form of farewell): It's been very nice to acquaint with you. Although it sounds weird to me, it is grammatically correct, isn't it?
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25 views

Use “bridge” as an intransitive verb?

I found the following sentence: The system controller interfaces to the PCI bus and bridges to other buses. I can guess the meaning of it, but looking at all the dictionary the verb "bridge" does ...
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2answers
29 views

comma position in a list of subjects

In the following sentence, I mean policy makers and decision makers. It is not clear to me how to express this and where to place the comma: If I use this: This study benefit vendors, policy and ...
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1answer
29 views

propositions, using that which whose

Is the following sentence correct? "It is an organization including the countries, all or a significant part of their population has a connection with French language and culture." If not, how can ...
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17 views

how to say it in grammatically correct way

You should enjoy a day from its start or beginning? which one is better to use? it is a grammatically correct way how to say it? Thank you very much in advance.
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20 views

Is the sentence grammatically correct? (Concerned with tense usage)

Since I can understand the English dialogue without much difficulty, there’s no reason not to enjoy the films in the way the film-makers intended. I'm not sure whether I should use "intended" or "...
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1answer
35 views

Is “intend on” ungrammatical?

Is "intend on" ungrammatical? I thought that "intend to do something" and "intend on doing something" were synonymous, but I was told by a few people that "intend on" is ungrammatical and is a ...
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1answer
57 views

Can a double negative be OK?

There is no job I cannot do. We are taught to avoid double negatives, and most of them sound really weird: That won't do you no good. She never goes with nobody. The example above these,...
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1answer
21 views

Using ('s) when describing object usage

Which sentence is correct? We prefer Chrome because it is the most widely used browser. As of 2019, Chrome usage is 50% Or, We prefer Chrome because it is the most widely used browser. Chrome's ...
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2answers
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What does “offering” mean in this sentence in The Storied Life of A. J. Fikry?

On the first page of The Storied Life of A. J. Fikry: Serviceable-enough Dahl offering, though Lambiase questioned whether a professional housewife could successfully cook a leg of lamb in the manner ...
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3answers
14 views

“work that identify” or “work that identifies”

Implicitly by work I mean plural (several studies). So how should I treat the verb that comes after it? Similar to previous work that identifies Or, Similar to previous work that identify
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1answer
30 views

Should I use “for” or “of” after the word “test”

I wan to say we tested (tried) iphone version # Which one is correct? Our test of iphone version # shows that ... Or, Our test for iphone version # shows that ...
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22 views

on using “to denote” to define a term

I want to define few terms but not sure how to use denote. For example: We use the term XYZ to denote websites consisting of ... Is the above correct statement?
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14 views

…books that give / giving details of the topic [duplicate]

As a basic learner I am confused about these two sentences: I have some books that give details of the topic. I have some books giving details of the topic. Both seems to carry the same ...
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1answer
16 views

Were it not for VS Had it not been for

The following is part of writing on the Navajo Code Talkers during the second world war. *One Marine Corps signal officer summed up the situation after the war: "Were it not for the Navajo Code ...
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2answers
189 views

“due” instead of “to”?

"Take your orni and fly due south-west." I heard this quote in a dialogue from the game "Dune" and I was wondering if the usage of "due" is applicable in this case.
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30 views

“do the pair of vertical lines” or “does the pair of vertical lines”?

this is the title of this post do the pair of vertical lines in empirical entropy formula mean L1 norm? in this case, "do the pair of vertical lines" or "does the pair of vertical lines" which one ...
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1answer
16 views

People all over the world / People from all over the world

An example in Collins Dictionary: ...the letters she received from people all over the world. But if I write: ...the letters she received from people from all over the world. Is it correct? ...
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17 views

Is this sentence correct to ask for a go

I have to ask a customer, if I can proceed with my work and I set up this sentence: Please tell me if I should proceed. Is this correct or is there a better way?
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1answer
26 views

“Who would you rather had won” is this correct?

Which of these sentences is correct? "Who would you rather had won?" "Who would you rather have won?" "Who would you rather have win?" "Who would you rather had win?" I can find instances of people ...
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2answers
65 views

It wonders me. Possible?

Is there such a usage with the word "wonder"? It wonders me whether you've been to Paris. I know of "bothers me" and "amuses me".
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39 views

How do you tell someone who's asking you for directions, in a single sentence, that they could follow you since you're headed in the same direction?

What is the proper sentence to use when you're trying to tell the person asking for directions that they could follow you because the way you're headed largely overlaps with theirs (I'm particularly ...
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1answer
26 views

Using “not only”

I hear word today from Trump, He said: "Not only have thousands of JOBS been created in USA, we’re shipping freedom and opportunity abroad!" I have three questions: most of time we use NOT ONLY ...
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2answers
57 views

“There is 10%” or “there are 10%”

Shall I use: Of the 10% that showed one or more symptoms, there are 20.25% that .. Or, Of the 10% that showed one or more symptoms, there is 20.25% that .. Clearly, 10% of a countable thing (...
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12 views

Using comma before a non-essential reduced relative clause which describes the object of the main clause

I am really confused about dangling phrases. Which sentences below are grammatically correct? I think just 1 and 4 are correct here? 1- Did you read Hamlet, which was written by William ...
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1answer
51 views

Does “to turn oneself something” mean what I want it to mean to a native speaker?

Is this sentence correct English? You turn yourself listless. Would you know what it means? Is this how you normally phrase this expression? Is the tense of the verb right? Is that a commonly ...
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16 views

What kinds of music you don't like? or What kinds of music don't you like?

What is more proper to say: What kinds of music you don't like? What kinds of music don't you like? Can you please explain why?
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25 views

Can 'one' as a pronoun be replaced with he/she or anyother pronoun later on in the sentence?

I found the following information on Wikipedia. I want to know whether its usage is grammatically correct. (from academic perspective)
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23 views

Is “Could you tell people about your experience playing twins before” grammatical?

Is the sentence : Could you tell people about your experience playing twins before? grammatically correct? Shouldn't it be: Could you tell people about your experience with playing twins ...
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27 views

experience the feeling that you {do/have}

Should it be: I experience the feeling that you do right now or: I experience the feeling that you feel right now
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17 views

If +going to in a conditional sentence

Is this sentence grammatically correct? If the weather is going to be nice tomorrow, we'll have a picnic.
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52 views

Analyzing “This was the long way, which we had to go”

This was the long way, which we had to go. I think this sentence is grammatically correct and which is referring to the long way and there is no need to use that to restrict the long way because as ...