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Questions tagged [grammaticality-in-context]

For questions about whether something obeys the rules of English grammar in a certain context.

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Is "ones" in this sentence grammatical?

I encountered the "ones" functioning as a possessive pronoun in this context: In the individual, this cultural context is expressed in terms of ones attitudes, beliefs, personality ...
Lerner Zhang's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
70 views

Software on/under/in a computer

In a technical documentation, I came across the title "How to run this software under Mac M1 or M2". This made me wonder, again, about a flaw in translation. We often say: "The software ...
Sven Puschmann's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
36 views

"I will collect my necklace after it is being prepared"

Could you please tell me?. Whether "After it is being prepared" mean "After it has been prepared" or "after its is prepared" or it could mean either/both.
Bilal Zafar's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
25 views

Are all these sentences grammatically correct and mean the same thing?

I was a little late to call him. I was a little late in calling him. I was a little late for calling him. Are all three sentences grammatically correct? Do they mean the same thing? The last one, to ...
Pleep Ploop's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
31 views

Do these sentences (1 and 2) have the same meaning?

You don't follow my mails, that's why you missed the meeting. Were you following my mails, you would not have missed the meeting. I believe that they do, but my friend tells me that the second one is ...
Andrey Timofeyev's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
88 views

Which is correct, "What exam have you had today" or "What exam did you have today"?

If somebody completed an exam at six pm and it is already nine pm, should I say "What exam have you had today" or "What exam did you have today"?
Germain ELLA NDJONGUELE's user avatar
-1 votes
2 answers
42 views

Is it possible to read 4,500,000,000 as four thousand five hundred million?

Is it possible to read 4,500,000,000 as four thousand five hundred million? I know the number is four billion five hundred million, but wonder if there is another option.
jung won kim's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
393 views

Can a colon lists out multiple incomplete sentences?

I raised a similar question here, but the bulleted list example in the only answer to that question confused me, just like this case, as below, I encountered here: A user agent may terminate service ...
Lerner Zhang's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
47 views

When is it better to finish a sentence with a preposition? [duplicate]

I am currently in the process of learning English and I encountered some grammatical structure I am not completely comfortable with, so I would be interested to have more information about these. Here ...
Falcon's user avatar
  • 123
3 votes
1 answer
608 views

A very complicatedly structured sentence

I was reading Never Split the Difference: Negotiating As If Your Life Depended On It when I encountered a very complicatedly structured sentence in the "September 30, 1993" section of ...
Lerner Zhang's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
22 views

What are the 2 different used of Must +present perfect forms?

She must have helped her ailing parents. Im the above sentence a guess is made about a past action that definitely or possibly happened.Can such structures be also used to express the wish of the ...
Altaf Jahangir's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
36 views

There answer to "What were you doing yesterday?"

What were you doing yesterday? I was reading for an hour. or What were you doing yesterday? I spent an hour reading. or What were you doing yesterday? I read for an hour.
user1425's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
31 views

Starts of plagued or starts of plaguing

After a rigged vote, the new government starts off plagued by illegitimacy and a mounting financial crisis. After a rigged vote, the new government starts off plaguing by illegitimacy and a mounting ...
Abid's user avatar
  • 385
-2 votes
1 answer
45 views

Is my "for it" usage correct? [closed]

I have a custom "About Me" and it goes like this "I drink Red Bulls 'n Coffee everyday For it helps the troubles go away! Life becomes just a simple heart and headache Just by taking ...
Delta Oscar Uniform's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
92 views

On page or at page

Open your book at page 80. Turn at page 80. Open your book to page 80. Turn to page 80. Which preposition is better. Can we use both prepositions with the same meaning, or there is difference?
Abid's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
43 views

Is it idiomatic to say "If he knew where we are, he would be here by now"?

Supposing you're hiding from some intrusive relative, "If he knew where we are, he would be here by now" I think the part "where you are" is beyond the hypothetical scope, so I don'...
Let's user avatar
  • 719
-1 votes
1 answer
22 views

so + V-ing -- correct grammatical structure?

"One of the incentives for capping electricity use, rather than charging different amounts according to usage, was to make access to energy equitable. Every household has the same five kW cap, ...
hhhh's user avatar
  • 179
0 votes
2 answers
63 views

Why does "depth" have to be in its plural form in these sentences?

Why is there an "s" after the word "depth" in these sentences? Is it grammatically wrong if I remove the "s"? Alvin can dive to ocean depths of 20,000 feet. (For ...
hhhh's user avatar
  • 179
0 votes
2 answers
62 views

Is it grammatical to say "Here is very nice?"

There is a question that comes across to me--the word 'here' is a noun as well an adverb. Based on these two sentences: I like it here. I like here. Here is the book that you are looking for. The word ...
WONG QI XIAN Moe's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
92 views

". . . as had the estate" - a relative clause?

(From The Wrecker by Robert Louis Stevenson and Lloyd Osbourne, Chapter XVII, published 1892) Passage 264 “And what—what sort of a gentleman was this Mr. Carthew?” I gasped. “The ward-room steward ...
philphil's user avatar
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1 vote
4 answers
64 views

Is this gramatically correct: "A count of how many of this item are in the game and where this card lies within that count"?

I read the following sentence in a game rule book: An item card includes: a count of how many of this item are in the game and where this card lies within that count. Is this gramatically correct, ...
Darren Jordan's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
115 views

'that' - a relative pronoun or a conjunction?

(From The Wrecker by Robert Louis Stevenson and Lloyd Osbourne, Chapter XV, published 1892) Passage 243 “So we can keep the business to ourselves,” I mused. “There's one other person that might blab,”...
philphil's user avatar
  • 1,279
0 votes
2 answers
83 views

Is it 'fitted with' or 'fit with'? [closed]

Is it 'fit with' or 'fitted with'? In: A stand fitted with a protractor
The Amateur Coder's user avatar
3 votes
4 answers
129 views

What exactly connects the two phrases in encyclopedic sentences like these?

This particular phrasing seems common on for instance Wikipedia articles: Considered one of the most influential figures in the history of the motion picture, he pioneered many aspects of film ...
KeizerHarm's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
231 views

The Usage of "Would"

"The mission control experts cannot tell if the space junk is going to hit the space station or not, but they are sure that a collision would knock a hole in the hull and cause all air inside it ...
Erkut Ünlü's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
104 views

Worth as a predicate adjective?

I saw the first time 'worth' acting as a predicate adjective here: I do it because it makes me happy. And I now know that I deserve happiness. I deserve love, rest and time for myself. Because I am ...
Lerner Zhang's user avatar
  • 3,521
0 votes
1 answer
58 views

Why is the past tense sometimes used in a sentence together with the present tense?

Why in the sentence "I used to be in the government service, but am no longer" is the first part used in the past tense, and the second part in the present?
Elizabeth's user avatar
  • 315
0 votes
1 answer
53 views

What creates the flow between the two sentences? [closed]

I wrote the text. I think there is no need to add linking words like specifically or this is because before the second sentence but I don't know why. I learned that we can create a sense of flow by ...
newbie forever's user avatar
14 votes
6 answers
7k views

Olive Garden: "The cheese keeps coming 'til you say 'when'"

There's an Olive Garden commercial which has the line: At Olive Garden, the cheese keeps coming 'til you say "when". I certainly understand what it's saying: only when I tell them to stop ...
CDR's user avatar
  • 1,073
-1 votes
2 answers
161 views

Is it really wrong grammatically speaking to say " take advantage from" instead of "take advantage of"

I found examples of both phrases here https://sentencestack.com/q/take_advantage_from https://sentencestack.com/q/take_advantage_of Is taking advantage from people really wrong or just odd? as people ...
Quique's user avatar
  • 600
8 votes
5 answers
2k views

Is the 'a nice' in 'a nice to have' grammatical?

In this context, 'a nice' is used as a noun as 'a must': Design’s role has moved from a nice to have to a must have to a differentiator I wonder if the 'indefinite article + adjective' form can ...
Lerner Zhang's user avatar
  • 3,521
9 votes
5 answers
2k views

Is it okay to say "must have to"?

Must and have to are both used for obligation, according to Have to, must and should for obligation and advice. However, I have come across to many sources with where they use must have to. On the ...
Ghost's user avatar
  • 537
9 votes
6 answers
5k views

Is "slightly ajar" a tautology?

I was reading the novel Verity, and I came across the phrase "slightly ajar door". I didn't know what ajar meant and I looked it up to find it means (of a door) slightly open. I wonder if &...
Akshay's user avatar
  • 109
0 votes
2 answers
66 views

The book was given to me (by Rion) - is it wrong to use a subject and a passive verb?

One of the forms of using passive verbs is: Object + Verb + "By + Subject" ("optional"). E.g. Sarah was killed by a police officer. My cat was killed by neighbor's dog. The book ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
290 views

Proficiency in vs proficiency at - Which should be used in the provided sentence?

His skills include proficiency in using various programming languages. His skills include proficiency at using various programming languages. A post on Quora suggests the latter sentence is more ...
Pleep Ploop's user avatar
  • 1,505
0 votes
1 answer
115 views

Differences in job titles. "Manufacturing manager", "Production manager", "Manufacture manager"

I was given a piece of business card with a job title "Manufacture manager". I wonder any differences between a. "Manufacturing manager" b. "Production manager" c. "...
Stats Cruncher's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
54 views

"She is living out at her home" or "She is living out her life at her home" - which sentence is more grammatically correct?

There are two sentences: She is living out at her home. She is living out her life at her home. I was said that the first is wrong as It doesn't contain "her life". Is it really so much ...
Rodrigo's user avatar
  • 415
0 votes
2 answers
65 views

Do I need a preposition in structures 'leaves smth someone?'

What preposition (if any) would you put in the following sentence? This leaves (to/for/-) ethnic minorities little room to dissent, especially (to/for/-) those who also experience financial problems.
Arseny Aleev's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
458 views

I don't... neither am I in one sentence

I don't want to go out, neither am I interested in going to your place. Is this sentence correct? Can I use "neither" after saying that I don't do something? Most examples that I've seen ...
Arseny Aleev's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
37 views

Is this a kind of call or not? --meaning in context--

Following is a poem by Thomas Hardy. There are sentences 'Simple shepherds all' three times. I think these sentences are a kind of call towards shepherds. However, one of my friends who is a literary ...
Japanese English teacher's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
183 views

Why isn't it natural to say "throughout today" or "throughout yesterday"?

Question According to this post, the following uses of throughout are grammatical, but sound strange to native speakers(or maybe even wrong according to a comment on the post): throughout today ...
catwith's user avatar
  • 1,048
0 votes
1 answer
2k views

Tag question of ought to

I would like to know the tag question of "ought to" is oughtn't to or shouldn't ? For example, He ought to have made a note of it, ________? For this sentence, the tag will be "oughtn't ...
user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
175 views

If "some paper" means "a sheet of paper", then what would be the plural form of "some paper"?

This is from a native speaker on BBC, Mr. Maker (see: 2:38-2:44). He says: Now how about we get some white paper and draw two fluffy cloud shapes. When he says this, he takes a sheet of paper and ...
Yunus's user avatar
  • 7,401
-1 votes
1 answer
61 views

Is "Decorators are a proposal" grammatically correct?

Decorators are a proposal for extending JavaScript classes which is widely adopted among developers in transpiler environments, with broad interest in standardization. Is "Decorators are a ...
Wenfang Du's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
11 views

Is the structure "would + subject + have" in non-interrogative sentences possible?

I was writing a short story and realized I made a mistake using "would + have". At first, I tried writing the sentence like the one below but then realized the subject had to go after would. ...
once upon a time 's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
87 views

Is "all HTML elements are a single word" grammatically correct?

This prevents conflicts with existing and future HTML elements, since all HTML elements are a single word. (from "vue/multi-word-component-names") Is "all HTML elements are a single ...
Wenfang Du's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
49 views

"Should 'creature' be pluralized to 'creatures' in the sentence 'In the fish village, the small fish weren’t the only glowy creature'?"

The sentence is "In the fish village, the small fish weren’t the only glowy creature" . Should the word "creature" be pluralized to "creatures" to match the plural form ...
cengaver's user avatar
  • 103
0 votes
1 answer
31 views

Who do you think is the best boy in our class

Who do you think is the best boy in our class? I think this structure is not grammatical. I think the correct one should be:Who do you think the best boy in our class is? Because we say "Do you ...
Sahil Laskar's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
162 views

Meaning of He can run fast as I can

A. He is tall as I am. B. He can run fast as I can. C. He can sing as She can. Are the sentences above grammatical? I used as instead of as...as construction. What are the meaning of these sentences? ...
Sahil Laskar's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
28 views

A citizen questioning his government is not a crime

A citizen questioning his government is not a crime. Is its structure grammatical? It sounds weird to me. What I think the structure means is 'A citizen is not a crime' which is the reduced form of '...
Sahil Laskar's user avatar

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