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Questions tagged [grammaticality-in-context]

For questions about whether something obeys the rules of English grammar in a certain context.

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A citizen questioning his government is not a crime

A citizen questioning his government is not a crime. Is its structure grammatical? It sounds weird to me. What I think the structure means is 'A citizen is not a crime' which is the reduced form of '...
Sahil Laskar's user avatar
3 votes
3 answers
525 views

Stossel has since become a pivotal part of the Time Well Spent movement. What structure is this?

I have learnt about the present perfect tense which uses the structure S(single) + has PP + since the time clause. However, when it comes to a reading lesson I have, there is a sentence on the page ...
Akane Ura's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
34 views

I left the place without/before the situation getting worse

1. I left the place before the situation getting worse. 2. I left the place without the situation getting worse. 3. I had left the place before the situation got worse. Are these sentences grammatical?...
Sahil Laskar's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
26 views

Which part is indispensable in constructions like "as it is illustrated..."?

This conclusion can be verified by checking all the situations as it is illustrated in the appendix. This conclusion can be verified by checking all the situations as is illustrated in the appendix. ...
Ypbor's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
33 views

blow a hole in vs open a hole in

What's the difference between: The president's statements blown a hole in the country. The president's statements opened a hole in the country.
Southman's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
45 views

She would have been Sapna

Let's think of a situation. I'm talking to my father. He tells me that a girl came to our house yesterday and asked him about me. Now my father asks me "Who was she?" I'm not sure who she ...
Sahil Laskar's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
61 views

Why does the verb "TO LIKE" have to take an object in "yes-or-no answers", when there is no chance of confusion?

A: Do you like coffee? B: No I dont like. / Yes I like. We all know B's answer is wrong. Why? Because "TO LIKE" is a transitive verb and it needs an "IT" at the end. However, we ...
Yunus's user avatar
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4 votes
2 answers
977 views

What do you call an undergrad student who completed his degree?

I'm trying to write the following sentence correctly: X is a graduated undergraduate student from my same undergraduate university. I hope you get the gist. X is a student who completed his ...
Zabir Al Nazi's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
61 views

Ram is the man I thought to have killed/ have killed my brother

Ram is the man I thought to have killed my brother. Ram is the man I thought to kill my brother. Ram is the man I thought have killed my brother. Ram is the man I thought killed my brother. Are ...
Sahil Laskar's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
28 views

How does this sentence follow subject verb agreement?

I dont understand how the following sentence is following correct subject and verb agreement. Do authors think that including examples from the text files has widespread applicability? Grammarly ...
Exploring's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
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"That is *how* I am called"

I used to think it's incorrect to say "how something is called", that it's a common mistake of non-native speakers, and that we must use "what" instead. But I just came across the ...
splaytreez's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
45 views

the distinction appeared much clearer

Concepts of nature are always cultural statements. This may not strike Europeans as much of an insight, for Europe’s landscape is so much of a blend. But in the new worlds ― ‘new’ at least to ...
Aaaaaaassssss's user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
277 views

can you use "over" to mean "relative to"?

They prefer this method because of the cost reduction over traditional techniques. Can "over" be used in this case instead of "relative to"? I feel like the sentence can be easily ...
Leo 's user avatar
  • 21
0 votes
1 answer
81 views

I picked up the letter that was lying on the floor. Does it sound all right?

Here's my context: I entered the room and I saw a big heap of letters on the desk. One of them had fallen on the floor. I picked up the letter lying on the floor. / I picked up the letter that was ...
Let's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
49 views

I want to know usage of 's (with apostrophe) in the example given below

According to some grammar, 's is used for human. I know some of the usages here: My uncle's son Faizan goes to Bombay Cambridge School every day. Used as ‘of’ for human possession. It’s been ages ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
31 views

Present simple or Future simple to answer question about schedule

I learned that we should use present simple to talk about schedules. However, if people were to ask me when will my flight leave. How should I respond? A. My flight will leave at 1:00 pm. B. my flight ...
Chhangsreng P's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
25 views

Mixing past and present in the same sentence

Why are the past and present tenses mixed up in the following sentence? Our findings are consistent with a recent comparative study on image processing systems, which also stated that source code for ...
Exploring's user avatar
  • 135
0 votes
1 answer
38 views

What does 'bad cold' refer into this situation?

‘They didn’ keep their gold in the house, boy! Nah, first stop fer us is Gringotts.Wizards’ bank. Have a sausage, they’re not bad cold – an’ I wouldn’ say no teh a bit o’ yer birthday cake, neither.’ ‘...
M.MAHDI's user avatar
  • 149
0 votes
2 answers
86 views

I know "divorced" could be an "adjective" but can I say "they got divorced" as in "They became divorced"

I know "divorced" could be an "adjective" but can I say "they got divorced" as in "They became divorced". Secondly i believe here in this sentence "got ...
Bilal Zafar's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
44 views

Can I say 'a guy or girl' instead of 'a guy or a girl'?

When asking someone's sex online, we can ask 'are you a guy or a girl'. But is it correct to ask 'are you a guy or girl'?
Michael's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
35 views

Expressions from News headlines

I'm trying to know which of these expressions is/are correct: Kidnapped victims Abducted victims kidnap victims Note: I have noticed that most news blogs and websites for some weird reasons, prefer ...
SugarRay's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
42 views

Use of first conditional

We can't know for sure what will happen in the future. In this case, do we use a first conditional? For instance: If the weather improves, we're going to the beach. Here, we don't know wheather the ...
Jembot's user avatar
  • 736
0 votes
2 answers
55 views

Is the correct preposition used in: "Evaluating Xtool at/in Y"?

For an article title, I am thinking of using "Evaluating Xtool at/in Y", but I am not sure what preposition is correct. The tool "Xtool" can perform Y, being Y an expression, e.g. &...
L30nardo SV.'s user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
304 views

I'll get you some coffee vs I'll go get you some coffee

ex.1: I'll get you some coffee. ex.2: I'll go get you some coffee. ex.3: I'll get some coffee to you (sounds natural to a native speaker?) Do examples 1 and 2 mean the same thing?
Southman's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
1k views

''it seems it was only yesterday'' vs ''it seems like only yesterday''

What's the difference entre : ex.1 : It’s been over a year since we met, but it seems it was only yesterday. ex.2: It’s been over a year since we met, but it seems like only yesterday. Does the verb &...
Southman's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
46 views

"She is running with the ball in his glove."

First thing first, the title isn't a typo and I intentionally wrote it like that. This question came to mind while I was reading someone's post in another forum and it's about the possibility of the ...
user516076's user avatar
  • 5,032
0 votes
1 answer
54 views

Dive into something [closed]

Can you say intead of lose yourself in music dive into music? In terms of "to be so interested in something that you do not notice what is happening around you"(macmillandictionary source)
Boyep's user avatar
  • 1,440
0 votes
1 answer
96 views

Is saying "I'm people" in a certain context correct?

After reading my previous post carefully, I could say that this question is different from this question: Is "It's people" grammatically correct?. Suppose, there is this monolog: There are ...
user516076's user avatar
  • 5,032
5 votes
3 answers
4k views

Is "It's people" grammatically correct?

Can I say "it's people"? Is there a situation where this phrase can be used in a daily speech and grammatically correct? Usage example: A: Why don't you understand? B: Me? It's people who ...
user516076's user avatar
  • 5,032
0 votes
2 answers
1k views

He is dead or He has died

There's little mention about those different words and from what I read here, I ended up thinking that people will unlikely write he's died to mean he has died. However that's my mere opinion. I ...
user516076's user avatar
  • 5,032
0 votes
2 answers
494 views

The difference between now and right now or at the moment

I have this similar discussion I found right here, but it doesn't answer my question. The question of mine itself came to mind while I'm asking the difference between ahora and ahorita, and someone ...
user516076's user avatar
  • 5,032
0 votes
1 answer
174 views

Is the phrase (I find it + verb) correct?

I was reading a comment and there's a part of his comment that makes me think, here is the screenshot: Is the sentence I find it works even correct? Because, as far as I know, the phrase "I find ...
user516076's user avatar
  • 5,032
0 votes
1 answer
571 views

Why does "You have not to do it" mean "You don't have to do it"?

I'm requesting you to do it . I'm requesting you not to do it. Both make sense. The second one doesn't mean that "I'm not requesting you to it" rather it talks about prohibition. But, You ...
Sahil Laskar's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
29 views

Is the form [What time is + noun-phrase] ungrammatical?

This question sprang to mind while I was learning Chinese using an app. To make it clear what sentence I tried to translate, it's: 你们上午几点喝茶? The suggestion answer from the app is What time in the ...
user516076's user avatar
  • 5,032
0 votes
1 answer
106 views

Can I say Ram has been in Delhi for three years

Suppose I just want to say that Ram has a three years experience of working in our company. Can I say : Ram has worked in our company for three years? Similarly, if Ram has a three years experience of ...
Sahil Laskar's user avatar
7 votes
6 answers
821 views

Can "another" be preceded by "what" as in "What another factor will affect the rollout of the product?"

I've recently seen this question in an English textbook. (One of the only two factors is........) What another factor will affect the rollout of the product? This struck me as awkwardly sounding ...
Vun-Hugh Vaw's user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
463 views

Can the phrase "I think I got it thanks" offend people?

I have searched and read some related questions from this site, here are some of the topics: discussion 1, discussion 2, discussion 3, discussion 4, discussion 5 and discussion 6. However, none of ...
user516076's user avatar
  • 5,032
-3 votes
1 answer
41 views

Can "in real" be used instead of "in reality" in a sentence? [closed]

Can 'A tomato is a fruit in reality, not a vegetable' be also written as 'A tomato is a fruit in real, not a vegetable' ?
Harshit Rajput's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
54 views

Why there is no 'had' in the following sentence?

Original statement: The passive reading step works best if you thoroughly completed the Step 1. Revised statement: The passive reading step works best if you had thoroughly completed the Step 1. I ...
Subrato Pattanaik's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
168 views

Is ready to watch or Is ready to be watched?

I need to know which one is correct between the options in the bracket below: The usher said that this film is ready (to watch/to be watched) at 3:30. Let's go home it's still 8:00 in the morning. ...
user516076's user avatar
  • 5,032
0 votes
1 answer
29 views

Sorry for/Sorry about in similar constructions

Sorry about trying to get there on time, he said sarcastically. Sorry for trying to get there on time, he said sarcastically. Is using about in constructions where you're offering more details than ...
Nopeyes21's user avatar
  • 189
0 votes
1 answer
72 views

Since I have used `have rolled` should I use `had rolled down` or `have rolled down`?

Since I have used have rolled should I use had rolled down or have rolled down? When the driver drives and you have rolled the window of the car down and you are sitting in the back seat, what will ...
kan's user avatar
  • 13
0 votes
1 answer
36 views

"to bring back into use something"?

From the definition of "resurrect" on Oxford Learner's Dictionaries: resurrect something to bring back into use something such as a belief, a practice, etc. that had disappeared or been ...
catwith's user avatar
  • 1,048
0 votes
1 answer
62 views

"Not to go to X" or "To not go to X"?

Dad is looking for an excuse not to go to the wedding. Dad is looking for an excuse to not go to the wedding. I don't know whether or not they are correct. Both sentences are found in my language ...
user516076's user avatar
  • 5,032
0 votes
0 answers
35 views

Does "I should take an aspirin" have two meanings?

Mr. Swan in his book Oxford Grammar said that "if I were you" can be omitted when someone gives advice. For instance, I should take an aspirin. would mean I suggest you take an aspirin. ...
user516076's user avatar
  • 5,032
2 votes
1 answer
362 views

the use of import (important) not "of import"

I have had a lot of trouble finding an answer on this, mainly because searching for import obviously has far more results for the other meaning. The few results I have found always give examples of ...
RainMan's user avatar
  • 17
0 votes
1 answer
32 views

Does using "there" a second time matter?

I'm going to the hospital tomorrow. Usually, there are more people waiting to see the doctor than you can count, so I'll be late. I'm going to the hospital tomorrow. Usually, there are more people ...
Nopeyes21's user avatar
  • 189
0 votes
2 answers
20 views

Why the article is omitted in this context?

When scouring thefreedictionary to find a word I didn't know the meaning of, I encountered this definition for the phrase "hands off" An instruction for one to refrain from touching or ...
Static Bounce's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
36 views

Can "whose" be replaced with "with the/a" in this sentence? Which sentence is better?

I wrote a simple Email whose goal was to inform friends and family about the party. Can the "whose" in the sentence be replaced with "with a/the" to make the sentence like: I ...
The Amateur Coder's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
603 views

When to use 'know' and 'knows'?

Do you use 'know' or 'knows' in this sentence As the clued-up population of this century know/knows... My English tutor suggests 'knows'.
user324713's user avatar

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