Questions tagged [grammaticality]

Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of English grammar.

136 questions with no upvoted or accepted answers
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'global role' vs 'role globally'

In a footnote at the bottom of page 123 of A Student's Introduction to English Grammar (2005; by Huddleston and Pullum), I found mention of a construction in which adverbs modify nouns: There is a ...
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103 views

Consider them to be smart…but Say them to be smart?

If we can say: He is considered (to be) smart. We consider him (to be) smart. By the same token, I have also heard: We think him (to be) smart or think him dead. It is also correct to say: He is ...
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51 views

Using plurals of scientific words regarding events

Mostly people say "too much apoptosis can lead to cancer" or "too much photosynthesis". However would it be wrong to say "many apoptoses" or "too many a apotosis" or "too many apoptoses"? The first ...
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415 views

“I would hate anything to happen to her” vs. “I would hate if anything should to happen to her”

I have a question regarding the sentence found in the song "Girlfriend in a coma" by The Smiths, and the song goes: There were times when I could have strangled her But you know, I would hate ...
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2answers
70 views

It took a little time because of a great friend

I want to say that I wanted to quit, but I stayed a little bit longer because of her. It took a little time because of a great friend. Is this grammatically correct?
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162 views

past tense/present tense… which one is best in this context?

Earlier this morning, I opened the list on my computer to check: A.    ...if there was anyone I knew who had made the list. B.    ...if there was anyone I know who had ...
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31 views

“What is the opposite word for X?” Is the sentence correct?

I always use: What is the opposite of X ? But today I came across: What is the opposite word for X ? Are the both grammatical? Thank you.
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134 views

“I can't understand what does it mean.” vs “I can't understand what it means.”

My English skills are poor. Which of these is correct to say? "I can't understand what does it mean" or "I can't understand what it means".
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32 views

“prettier of the two” or "THE prettier of the two?

Am I using 'the' at the wrong place in the following sentence? Which sentence is correct? • She is the prettier of the two sisters. OR, • She is prettier of the two sisters.
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11 views

Are con­junc­tions like “and” al­lowed be­fore a tran­si­tion word?

In this sen­tence, is it gram­mat­i­cally cor­rect to use and be­fore con­se­quently? He did not sub­mit the ap­pli­ca­tion by the dead­line and con­se­quently, his ap­pli­ca­tion was not con­sid­...
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38 views

Uncertain vs uncertain about

Uncertain how to react, she was puzzled when she found that she was being cheated. Vs Uncertain about how to react, she was puzzled when she found that she was being cheated. Also, I am ...
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57 views

Usage of hyphen in “bit-will”

This is the whole paragraph. What confuses me here that why should the author have used hyphen between bit and will here also. Is this a typo error, which implies to have been used an emdash as a ...
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79 views

using “as far as” or “to as far as”

I have a sentence: I am fascinated by traveling, but I did not imagine that I could go to as far as America Or I am fascinated by traveling, but I did not imagine that I could go as far as ...
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34 views

Usage of 'any' before more and comparative degrees

Could anyone please tell me what is the role of any in this sentence and can I leave out any in the sentence? I love to read books. I have books of many writers. I have a book named 'Gitanjali' ...
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1answer
8k views

Sentence Structure - “You've got vs you got to see

I would like to check if my following sentence structure is correct. You've got to see my enemy's face when I was winning. or You got to see my enemy's face when I was winning.
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52 views

Should “The man has always needed religion and as profoundly as he has always needed food” use a simple tense instead?

Should this sentence's verbs indicate that the actions occurred in the past indirectly by using the compound present prefect construction: The man has always needed religion and as profoundly as he ...
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125 views

Grammaticality: 'such […] relief as to this Honourable Court may seem just'

Source: Ontario Small Claims Court - A Practical Guide (2011), p. 82 Middle. The plaintiff claims: [...] (f) such further and other relief as to this Honourable Court may seem just This ...
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2k views

Verbs of perception: see, hear, watch + object +[bare infinitive/ gerund/ adjective/ past participle/]

Some of the verbs called "verbs of perception or perceptual. However many English language learners would face many problems with using them, me one of them. > Some of them are being used in such ...
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54 views

Can a result clause come before a conditional clause when “if” is omitted?

Quote from here: http://www.englishbaby.com If I were you, I would call her. --------> Were I you, I would call her. If I had known, I wouldn't have done it. ---------> Had I known, I ...
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188 views

Can a participle phrase modify a whole sentence or clause?Or they have to stick to a specific word or phrase?

This is what my friend asked me and he gave out the following examples: Facebook's new feature translates your post into different languages depending on who's reading it. Depending on what ...
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324 views

Help me understand “You become a …creature who slips into a sort of mediocrity where…”

You become a cold, calculating creature who slips into a sort of mediocrity where you realize there is difference between your desired self and your actual self In the above sentence, there are ...
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1k views

Usage of future perfect with 'by then'

What is the difference between A) By then, you will have shown what you meant to do since the beginning. B) By then, you will show what you meant to do since the beginning. Is B grammatically ...
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162 views

Can 'to think' be an ordinary monotransitive verb?

(Per p 78, A Student's Introduction to English Grammar (2005), by Huddleston & Pullum) 'ordinary monotransitive' means this structure: Subject-Predicate-Direct Object-Predicative Complement. ...
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2answers
16 views

Is the following sentence grammatically incorrect and is it used colloquially?

(1) I don't know what graph theory is. According to the grammar, I believe it should be: (2) I don't know what is graph theory. But is it spoken colloquially the way I wrote it in (1)? Grammar ...
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100 views

Is gerund after “lead + object pronoun + to” possible

Is it correct to say: John's interest in animals led him to becoming a vet. Or is this the only correct form: John's interest in animals led him to become a vet. Thank you in advance.
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406 views

Is this grammatical? “This game will be decided by which team has the better strikers.”

"This game will be decided by which team has the better strikers." I am not at all sure if this is grammatical and there are certainly easier ways to say this like "The team with the better strikers ...
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315 views

Is there a 'generic we' in English?

Some languages around the world use the generic we instead of English's preferred one or you. I have noticed that some people, when asking questions on this site (EL&U although the same principle ...
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6k views

Does “kindly do the reimbursement” need an article?

I am writing a reimbursement letter: I booked train ticket for Dr.David journey on 19.Apr.2016 and the ticket is attached for your kind perusal. I request you to kindly do the reimbursement ...
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13k views

Is “I have had to take a leave” correct?

I am little bit confused about English grammar structure about "Have had to" and its uses and needed some clarification on the same. For example: I have had to take a leave. Is it grammatically ...
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28 views

Causative verb usage with must

Can we use causative have with modal must. Suppose you must have had those document published by you. you must have the documents prepared by someone. Are these idiomatic and grammatical. actually i ...
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19 views

Have causative verb get causative verb

I am in confusion of using causative verb 'have' If i write "I wanted to have you sit on the chair". " i wanted to get you to sit on the chair". "Why did you get him to come with you?" Are those ...
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31 views

is it correct to say “Can my spouse be covered under my health insurance?”

In an email I want to ask about health insurance of my spouse by my company. What is the correct way to ask about it? Is it grammatically correct to say under my health insurance in the following ...
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14 views

Usage of number in grammar

I have seen pepole saying 'station is next but one'.can we write that 'station is one next.i can remember i heard it but i am not sure.i have search the google but did not find any answer
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Can we write- please confirm about your duty

Can I use -please confirm about your duty.?
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35 views

Can I say “I hope I can get any chance to go back”?

My friend said, “Can’t wait for you to come back.” Can I say: I hope I can get any chance to go back. Or If only I can get any chance to go back. Or I hope I will get a chance. Do they ...
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24 views

“Would you?” or “Will you?”

I'm in the process of book-writing (mainly for fun; I don't think it's one I will ever publish, but who knows), and a good friend of mine is proof-reading it for me. It's more like me making her do it ...
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18 views

Similar sentence/omission of preposition

I'm in the same class you're in. I'm in the same class you are. I'm in the same class as you. Are these sentences grammatically correct? Is the sentence in the middle, with the omitted ...
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14 views

at the time/when- similar in usage?

I broke my ankle when I was in fourth grade. When I was fourth grade I broke my ankle. At the time I broke my ankle, I was in fourth grade. Do all three of these sentences mean the same ...
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27 views

What do they vs What they

I wonder ____________. ---Pandas. A. what do they call these animals. B. what they call these animals. C. what they do call these animals. I guess if it is a personal conversation, it would be "...
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30 views

On modifying the resumptive modifier

Usually, the resumptive modifier works as follows: Life is all about moments, moments that record achievements, moments that record time with family. I wonder what is the grammatical function of ...
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34 views

Is “the most edifying of experiences” grammatical?

When I search the word 'edifying' in the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary, I get the sample sentence: Being left in a bar all afternoon with a load of football fans is not the most edifying ...
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44 views

Help understanding the structure of this sentence (Typical orienting reactions include *the following the arteries* to the brain…)

Typical orienting reactions include the following the arteries to the brain grow wider allowing more blood to reach it, the heart slows down and arteries to the large muscles become narrower so as to ...
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40 views

Subject-Verb agreement: the adjustment[s?] of the X and the Y lag actual conditions in the labour markets

A few hours ago I asked what lags meant in that specific context as I have not used that term before. I am now confused, I can't seem to be able to satisfy the subject-verb agreement (between ...
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18 views

What is the rule for when “a few X” is correct, vs when “a few of X” is correct?

There are lots of previous questions about "few", but I couldn't find any that addressed this aspect of its usage. What is the grammatical rule that makes the sentence "This will take a few of days" ...
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27 views

“He went ill and came back healthy” is it correct

I heard a man say: He went ill and came back healthy. Here ill and healthy are adjectives and qualify the subject, he. And the sentence structure is: sub + verb + adjective Is it ...
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32 views

Is it common/acceptable to use “the feeling of vulnerabilities”

Instead of saying I don't like to feel vulnerable, are the following acceptable too? I don't like the feeling of vulnerabilities. The feeling of vulnerabilities crippled me.
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I want to add something in here

During a conversation, I want to add something to the discussion, if I say "I want to add something in here, ..." is it grammatical?
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Usage of acquaint

Someone has just told me (as form of farewell): It's been very nice to acquaint with you. Although it sounds weird to me, it is grammatically correct, isn't it?
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25 views

Use “bridge” as an intransitive verb?

I found the following sentence: The system controller interfaces to the PCI bus and bridges to other buses. I can guess the meaning of it, but looking at all the dictionary the verb "bridge" does ...
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20 views

how to say it in grammatically correct way

You should enjoy a day from its start or beginning? which one is better to use? it is a grammatically correct way how to say it? Thank you very much in advance.