Questions tagged [grammaticality]

Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of English grammar.

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2answers
9k views

I don't know how to feel about it/I don't know what to feel about it

So, since there's a military coup going on in Turkey right now, a few of my friends have taken to Facebook to share how they feel about the whole thing. And, one of them put up a status that reads: ...
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1answer
27 views

Shouldn’t “language USE by learners” be “language USED by learners”?

A Cambridge english vocabulary says The Cambridge Learner Corpus is a collection of over 44 million words of English, based upon evidence of language use by learners from all over the world and ...
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34 views

Which is correct: “John was born after…” OR “John had been born after…”?

Is it correct to say: John was born decades after the death of his grandfather. or John had been born decades after the death of his grandfather? I remember learning that "had been" was a relative ...
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1answer
125 views

Grammaticality: 'such […] relief as to this Honourable Court may seem just'

Source: Ontario Small Claims Court - A Practical Guide (2011), p. 82 Middle. The plaintiff claims: [...] (f) such further and other relief as to this Honourable Court may seem just This ...
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1answer
133 views

Are they two subordinate clauses?

Consider the following sentence I got from github tutorial. If you’ve made a change that you feel would benefit the community as a whole, you should definitely consider contributing back. The part ...
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2answers
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“What do you mean (by)” without by?

Is it possible to say: What do you mean "Internet"? or What do you mean: "Internet"? instead of What do you mean by "Internet"?
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4answers
29k views

Does she have or has she got? Which one is correct?

I'm not sure which one is correct. I had read that "does have" is more likely used in American English and "has got" in British English. But which one of these is correct? What kind of hobbies does ...
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1answer
21 views

With or without a “be” when a verb in past participle form qualitys a subject

Chinese new subway cars start operation in U.S. Boston New subway cars built by a Chinese company for Boston residents started their first run in the U.S. city of Boston on Wednesday. If I make ...
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3answers
64 views

Continuous Past vs Continuous Past Perfect

Well, guys, please consider the following: When he arrived, she was repairing the bike. When he arrived, she had been repairing the bike. Which one is better? Or do they have their own meanings?
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21k views

Is “more better” ungrammatical?

I want to find out whether these sentences are grammatically incorrect: It is more better than your book or It is far more better than your book
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3answers
24k views

Is it correct to say “testing passed / failed”?

In software development, after I perform a number of tests on a program, is it grammatically correct to say "testing passed" (or failed)? It is probably correct to say "testing is completed", but it ...
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1answer
22 views

Using adjective before the word “something/someone”

We normally use these kinds of sentences: I need something strong or I have to hire someone intelligent. Here, the words "strong" and "intelligent" modify the nouns something and someone.So,we can ...
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150 views

about position of who what etc. in interrogative and negative sentence

Which sentence is correct? Who don't want to lend his umbrella? What Paul doesn't want to lend? What doesn't Paul want to lend?
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2answers
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It took a little time because of a great friend

I want to say that I wanted to quit, but I stayed a little bit longer because of her. It took a little time because of a great friend. Is this grammatically correct?
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1answer
162 views

past tense/present tense… which one is best in this context?

Earlier this morning, I opened the list on my computer to check: A.    ...if there was anyone I knew who had made the list. B.    ...if there was anyone I know who had ...
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1answer
26 views

Preposition problem in or on

I have a dobt that which one is correct he is in the chair he is on the chair Which one is right and why?
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2answers
33 views

Amy has had many different jobs : contraction

Can we contract the sentence Amy has had many different jobs to this one? Amy's had many different jobs
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1answer
37 views

“be in love” vs. “fall in love” in a perfect construction

Which one is correct grammatically? I've been in love with you ever since I saw you I've fallen in love with you ever since I saw you
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What do they vs What they

I wonder ____________. ---Pandas. A. what do they call these animals. B. what they call these animals. C. what they do call these animals. I guess if it is a personal conversation, it would be "...
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1answer
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being usages dilemma

I've read in BBC that we use use "being" as a verb-ing. BBC has listed two kind of usage, What I want to learn here is about "preposition+verb-ing" form of usage.It has been said that "being+past ...
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2answers
194 views

“due” instead of “to”?

"Take your orni and fly due south-west." I heard this quote in a dialogue from the game "Dune" and I am wondering if the usage of "due" is applicable in this case.
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1answer
27 views

“He went ill and came back healthy” is it correct

I heard a man say: He went ill and came back healthy. Here ill and healthy are adjectives and qualify the subject, he. And the sentence structure is: sub + verb + adjective Is it ...
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0answers
30 views

On modifying the resumptive modifier

Usually, the resumptive modifier works as follows: Life is all about moments, moments that record achievements, moments that record time with family. I wonder what is the grammatical function of ...
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1answer
31 views

Does here miss “have”: “What you been doing in there?”

In the book The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain on the first page there is a sentence: "What you been doing in there?" Isn't it correct "What have you been doing in there?"?
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Is “the most edifying of experiences” grammatical?

When I search the word 'edifying' in the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary, I get the sample sentence: Being left in a bar all afternoon with a load of football fans is not the most edifying ...
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2answers
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Uncertain vs uncertain about

Uncertain how to react, she was puzzled when she found that she was being cheated. Vs Uncertain about how to react, she was puzzled when she found that she was being cheated. Also, I am ...
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1answer
2k views

Correct the sentences

I like traveling around the world. I like going traveling around the world. I like going to travel around the world. I like going for traveling around the world.
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1answer
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Which one is right 'sale was increased' or 'sale increased'?

I have seen in some books authors write sale was increased, while others write sale increased. What is the difference between the two, and please explain why? For example, Sale increased in the UK ...
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1answer
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On using “conscious”

When I want to use conscious and unconscious in specific context, for example, security conscious users, which is correct: security-conscious users (with dash), or security conscious users (without ...
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1answer
97 views

Short answers - 'In Tokyo' v 'Tokyo'

This issue arose in a recent lesson. In short, it centres on the difference between: Where do you live? I live in Tokyo. v In Tokyo. v Tokyo. and: Which city do you live in? I live in Tokyo?...
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1answer
28 views

Is it correct to say: “Let's have another person into the game”?

Let us assume that we are three friends playing bowling and we like to have a 4th player. Can we say: "Let's have another person into the game"? I'm doubtful about the use of the word "into". Is this ...
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2answers
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Are con­junc­tions like “and” al­lowed be­fore a tran­si­tion word?

In this sen­tence, is it gram­mat­i­cally cor­rect to use and be­fore con­se­quently? He did not sub­mit the ap­pli­ca­tion by the dead­line and con­se­quently, his ap­pli­ca­tion was not con­sid­...
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1answer
1k views

Usage of future perfect with 'by then'

What is the difference between A) By then, you will have shown what you meant to do since the beginning. B) By then, you will show what you meant to do since the beginning. Is B grammatically ...
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1answer
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I feel a line of an article somewhat strange gramatically

I am currently reading this article, which has the below line, The outcome also reflects the seismic effect the U.K.'s decision three years ago to leave the 28-nation EU has had on the country's ...
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Is it common/acceptable to use “the feeling of vulnerabilities”

Instead of saying I don't like to feel vulnerable, are the following acceptable too? I don't like the feeling of vulnerabilities. The feeling of vulnerabilities crippled me.
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1answer
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Grammaticality and idiomaticity of “Help clarify”

Is the following sentence grammatical? An example could help clarify the problem. I hear the construction help clarify quite often, is it idiomatic?
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1answer
95 views

Is it correct to put “by the way” at the end of sentence?

Is it correct to put "by the way" at the end of sentence? I don't know it's gramatically correct or not. Sometimes, i use "by the way" at the end of sentence while i'm chatting. For example, Do you ...
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3answers
6k views

Difference between “hardly someone” and “hardly anyone”

The following construction is considered nonstandard in English Nowadays, hardly someone studies ancient Greek. It should be Nowadays, hardly anyone studies ancient Greek. And although the ...
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1answer
41 views

Using “get to” rather than “arrive at”?

Is this a grammatically and syntactically correct sentence? When you have got to at home you have to get on with the work straight away. I want to say when a person arrived at home he has to ...
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1answer
318 views

In syntax, why cannot we say things like “he took walked at the park”? but can say “he took a walk at the park”?

In syntax, why cannot we say things like "he took walked at the park"? but can say things like "he took a walk at the park"?
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4answers
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Are double negatives like 'he's never not been in the family' grammatically correct? [duplicate]

I'm asking this question because I was taught not to use double negatives, because they are ungrammatical and that people who use them sound uneducated. However, today here on this site I found an ...
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1answer
65 views

One of these most intelligent students whose example (is/are) being

Please help me with One of these most intelligent students whose example (is/are) being followed (is/are) David. (question 42) I have checked its answer, but I still don't understand it. The ...
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1answer
57 views

Usage of hyphen in “bit-will”

This is the whole paragraph. What confuses me here that why should the author have used hyphen between bit and will here also. Is this a typo error, which implies to have been used an emdash as a ...
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1answer
33 views

Is “I have yet to believe you were dead” grammatical?

Is it correct to say I have yet to believe you were dead If I mean a past event? I mean he was dead but I still dont belive it.
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2answers
287 views

Which is more formal - “bit urgent” or “urgent”?

When I am writing a formal email, let's say I wanted to let someone know that it is urgent but not extremely urgent. So what is a formal way of telling my boss: If you sees this message, please ...
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1answer
126 views

“I have been doing this job” vs “since I am doing this job”?

I am really confused about these two sentences: 1:- I have been doing this job for 10 years. 2:- It has been 10 years since I am doing this job. Whether or not these sentences are same, if ...
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1answer
411 views

Replying to a morning greeting

When you are replying to a morning greeting, do you reply with "Good morning, too" or, "Good morning to you, too" or just, "Good morning"?
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Subject-Verb agreement: the adjustment[s?] of the X and the Y lag actual conditions in the labour markets

A few hours ago I asked what lags meant in that specific context as I have not used that term before. I am now confused, I can't seem to be able to satisfy the subject-verb agreement (between ...
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1answer
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Were it not for VS Had it not been for

The following is part of writing on the Navajo Code Talkers during the second world war. *One Marine Corps signal officer summed up the situation after the war: "Were it not for the Navajo Code ...
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1answer
64 views

What kinds of music you don't like? or What kinds of music don't you like?

What is more proper to say: What kinds of music you don't like? What kinds of music don't you like? Can you please explain why?