Questions tagged [grammaticality]

Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of English grammar.

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5k views

“Want to be able to” VS “Want be able to” [duplicate]

Which form is correct? I want to be able to run 3 miles even when I am very old. I want be able to run 3 miles even when I am very old.
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276 views

The present participle used for actions in the past

I have come across these sentences written in an English blog. The doctor, living in this house before us, moved to Australia. The doctors, attending a conference on malaria, urged governments ...
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1k views

Should I use “have ” or “are” when asking the question?

Have we crossed the bridge? Are we cross the bridge? Is this your pen? Has this your pen?
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273 views

I'd like to know which tense is appropriate

I'm confused which tense I should choose in the following sentence. I got an announcement from my school that I would be in charge of an additional class from next month. In this case, what should I ...
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2k views

Can “Why don't you be” be correct? If so, how is it different from “Why aren't you”?

In this comic occurs the phrase: Why don't you be more social? This sounds wrong to me, but I'm not sure why. Can the phrase Why don't you be... be correct? If it is correct, how does the ...
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3answers
64 views

“Gets dizzy” and comma splice when multiple events happen

Kevin gets dizzy, his sight blurs, and he falls. Is the comma splice okay? Is the phrase "gets dizzy" grammatically correct? Is anything else wrong with above sentence?
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161 views

in one ear and out the other

His lecture went in my one ear and out my other ear. If I use the determiner my, would it be grammatical to omit the headword ear in the second phrase of the conjunction, like this: . . . in my ...
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189 views

“Don't let dog out” vs “don't let the dog out”

Don't let dog out. Don't let the dog out. Are those sentences both valid, or is only the latter a valid one? Is the needed for non-proper nouns? Is "Don't let Mike out." valid?
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365 views

an object or some objects

Fact: Each object has a speed parameter Which of the following grammatical and sounds better? We use the symbol c[t1] henceforth, where c is a speed function and t1 is a speed parameter for an ...
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173 views

“Gave me one of the recipes that were/was”?

I know this is a common question on the web, but I still wasn't sure about this particular sentence. "She gave me one of the recipes that were/was in her personal cookbook." In this sentence, I'm ...
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3answers
2k views

You're a selfish, aren't you?

You're a selfish, aren't you? Is this grammatically correct, and is it how a native speaker would say it? The context is that person A continually acts in a selfish way, and now another person B (a ...
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139 views

Usage of “checkout” as a verb

What is the correct way to say? A user can enter their address when checking out. A user can enter their address when going through checkout.
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36 views

“guiding the tool”

The programmer can set breakpoints guiding the tool to freeze the program execution at specific control locations. Is the use of guiding in the sentence above correct? If it is correct, what grammar ...
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128 views

When can I use “being”?

If two paths have the same relevant slice with output being the slicing criteria, then they have the same input-output relation. I am not sure where we use being. Can we use being after the person or ...
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2answers
10k views

“Descent” vs. “descend” in the context

What causes a nose bleed during the descent? I am not sure that the descent is correct here or not grammatically. If it is correct so what about descend, (the)descending? Please add the reason of ...
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220 views

Usage of “flay at”

I used flay in the following sentence: I would rather he sprang up in anger, screaming or reproaching me, or even flaying at my festering soul with his fists. After checking ODO, I found that ...
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1answer
197 views

“You will find taxis waiting at the bus station ______ you can hire to reach your host family”

You will find taxis waiting at the bus station __ you can hire to reach your host family Two options: which where Which one is correct? I think (2), but the answer is (1): why is that?
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124 views

Does the 'verb form' always have to agree with the 'subject number'?

Is the 'verb and subject number agreement' a hard-and-fast rule? Or is there some leeway? For example, in the following sentences do I need to change the verb from 'was' to 'were' to match the ...
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1answer
730 views

“Looks daggers” vs. “look daggers”

"Looks daggers" or "look daggers": which one is correct? Ngram results here show almost equal results but when I searched for He looks daggers or He look daggers, I didn't find any matches. For ...
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11k views

How to say any day after a particular date?

My interviewer mailed me this: When can you come in for a technical interview? Is it correct to say "15th June 2013 or any other Saturday after that" or is there any other correct phrase to say ...
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214 views

What does “… they believe were to be …” mean?

For evidence, investigators pulled from along the driveway a few dozen castor bean plants that they believe were to be the raw material for the biological toxin ricin, which can be fatal if ingested ...
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2answers
155 views

Is it grammatically correct to remove “The” from the beginning of a photo title?

For example in a photo there is a river. Can we title it "River" and not "The River"? Or there are some women who are sitting and standing on the ground. Can we title the photo "Sitting & Standing ...
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2answers
3k views

“I'm not able to make it fly high”

I'm not able to make it fly high. If I change not able to unable, will it retain the same meaning? When should I use not able and when unable? Is the phrase fly high correct? Suppose I'm trying to ...
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1answer
73 views

“His sight blurs in dizzy.”

His sight blurs in dizzy. What wrong with "sight blurs in dizzy"? I don't find any google result for the phrase. The context is the following: The person is old and sick, and he is walking on the ...
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9k views

What's the role of “whatsoever” in this sentence?

Meanwhile, Cathy has become a prostitute at the most respectable brothel in the city of Salinas. She renames herself "Kate" and embarks on a devious – and successful – plan to ingratiate herself with ...
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608 views

I guess 'which' should be instead 'where' in these two sentences

In Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, I read: Nose still stinging where it had hit the hearth, Harry made his way swiftly and silently toward the door, but [...] (page 49) I think the ...
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171 views

Subject-verb-agreement

I'm learning English and I'm having trouble on understanding which word I should use to avoid any subject-verb agreement issue. Which one is correct? The counting of votes are easy. The ...
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113 views

Is it grammatically correct to write restrictive clauses (of the form: which … ) in this way?

The darkness, which had felt like it would last forever, gives way to dawn. The heavens open and light, which had seemed never to return, flows down. I could not help be overcome by wonder as I ...
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138 views

Is this verb usage idiomatically/grammatically correct?

For some reason, "slammed into" here sounds off to me. Does it sound OK to you? If it doesn't, please explain why. It was not uncommon for those chimpanzees to die within just a few days of ...
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272 views

Which of the two sentences is grammatically correct? Why?

Which of the following sentences is grammatically correct? Are both OK? The butler relayed to them Eugene’s instruction to use as little seasoning as possible. The butler relayed to them ...
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257 views

using plural nouns with plural nouns?

I wanted to say "Please take a look at the ones with check marks beside them". But I was kind of confused whether it is more correct to say "Please take a look at the ones with a check mark beside ...
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1answer
31k views

Attached is a copy you've requested?

My friend wrote me this sentence and got me really confused. "Attached is the file you've requested." Is this sentence grammatically correct? Why isn't it "attached is the file you requested"? I ...
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138 views

Present perfect or not?

I have some sentences that I wanted to ask the experts here. When emailing people in present tense, do I have to use future tense in order to be grammatically correct? "You need to call me ...
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331 views

Tense of noticing/realizing things

When you explain to someone that you realized or noticed something at a certain point, should the realizing or noticing be past perfect or simple past or present perfect? I emailed you because I ...
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621 views

Is this sentence grammatically correct? (in less than … since)

Is this sentence correct? The man died in less than a month since the start of his fast.
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12k views

Use of 'still' in present continuous tense

John is still reading the book. The above sentence looks odd to me. The use of 'still' in present continuous tense is not correct I guess? Right?
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stunningly at the end of a sentence

David, john and others are looking outside through the window stunningly. Here I put 'stunningly' at the end of a sentence to indicate that they look something stunned. Is this correct?
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What does one refer to?

Make new friends, but keep the old. One is silver, and the other gold. (A Korean middle school English textbook) Does one indicate new friends or any of both: new friends or the old ones?
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What does an “A/an before the comparative/superlative adjectives” change in the sentence, semantincally?

What is the difference when you use a/an before comparative/superlative adjectives and when you do not use it? Does it depend on the context or is there a grammatical rule? which one is correct? For ...
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1answer
46 views

“On the flatcar” versus “on to the flatcar” versus “on to flatcar” versus “on flatcar”

Mike helps John to get on the flatcar. Mike helps John to get on to the flatcar. Mike helps John to get on flatcar. Mike helps John to get on to flatcar. Mike helps John to get ...
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118 views

Should I use “was” or not?

I thought I was supposed to. He was served. The above two sentences are correct . Please explain me why the below sentence is wrong. What was happened to him?
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108 views

write form into cover letter [closed]

Today morning I have faced a viva-voce exam, and I did good in exam. How will I write this as formal cover-letter with 100 % Grammatically accuracy? What tense is good for mentioning this? past tense ...
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mixed functional and non-functional requirement

Some background: Functional requirement of a web service is concerned with the correctness of the web service's function, say the service will always return a number that is less than two. The non-...
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When and why do/does “staff” as a collective noun get plural/singular pronoun/verb?

I know that collective nouns such as staff, team, crew, and family can get both singular and plural pronouns/verbs in different situations and contexts, but my question is only about staff when used ...
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68 views

Correct usage of “which”

Am I using which correctly when combining the following sentences? The usage of normal vector for searching plane objects is introduced. The method is formed by seeking points representing a plane ...
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88 views

Can “relevant to” be replaced by “due to”?

In the following sentence, can "relevant to" be replaced by "due to"? Our modification addresses the problem relevant to disturbing objects attached to the main object. Our modification ...
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1answer
61 views

Is “in which” relevant here?

I am writing the following sentence. In contrast to the object modeling, (ABC et al., 2009) present an approach for urban object recognition using shape knowledge in which a set of features ...
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1answer
498 views

What is the difference between “can not” and “cannot”?

I have found both in texts of native English speakers but couldn't find the difference. In EL&U site people edited all my "can not" to cannot. So again I couldn't find out the matter. Which of ...
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1k views

Can the word “geek” be used as an adjective?

I'd like to know whether I should use the word "geek" as an adjective or noun?
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“Back in 2000 for example” or “for example, back in 2000”

I think the second sentence sounds nicer, but I was always taught that time should be at the beginning. So, what's right? Back in 2000 for example, I built a robot. For example, back in 2000, I built ...