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Questions tagged [grammaticality]

Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of English grammar.

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1answer
73 views

“His sight blurs in dizzy.”

His sight blurs in dizzy. What wrong with "sight blurs in dizzy"? I don't find any google result for the phrase. The context is the following: The person is old and sick, and he is walking on the ...
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1answer
113 views

Is it grammatically correct to write restrictive clauses (of the form: which … ) in this way?

The darkness, which had felt like it would last forever, gives way to dawn. The heavens open and light, which had seemed never to return, flows down. I could not help be overcome by wonder as I ...
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2answers
138 views

Is this verb usage idiomatically/grammatically correct?

For some reason, "slammed into" here sounds off to me. Does it sound OK to you? If it doesn't, please explain why. It was not uncommon for those chimpanzees to die within just a few days of ...
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1answer
168 views

Subject-verb-agreement

I'm learning English and I'm having trouble on understanding which word I should use to avoid any subject-verb agreement issue. Which one is correct? The counting of votes are easy. The ...
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1answer
31k views

Attached is a copy you've requested?

My friend wrote me this sentence and got me really confused. "Attached is the file you've requested." Is this sentence grammatically correct? Why isn't it "attached is the file you requested"? I ...
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1answer
138 views

Present perfect or not?

I have some sentences that I wanted to ask the experts here. When emailing people in present tense, do I have to use future tense in order to be grammatically correct? "You need to call me ...
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3answers
18k views

Is using 'yourselves' in this sentence grammatically correct?

Even among yourselves there will surely be differences and variances. Or should I use 'you' here?
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1answer
272 views

Which of the two sentences is grammatically correct? Why?

Which of the following sentences is grammatically correct? Are both OK? The butler relayed to them Eugene’s instruction to use as little seasoning as possible. The butler relayed to them ...
2
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1answer
331 views

Tense of noticing/realizing things

When you explain to someone that you realized or noticed something at a certain point, should the realizing or noticing be past perfect or simple past or present perfect? I emailed you because I ...
2
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1answer
616 views

Is this sentence grammatically correct? (in less than … since)

Is this sentence correct? The man died in less than a month since the start of his fast.
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1answer
590 views

How should I use “go + present participle”?

I read some activities are commonly expressed in English by "go + present participle." However, I found a sentence like "Let's go ride a bike!" and I am wondering which sentence I should use. ...
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4answers
31k views

“Is it proved that …?” vs. “Has it been proven that …?”

Searching The New York Times, I found 22,100 results for "is it proved" and, therefore, I argue that that phrase is likely correct English. But on History Stack Exchange a user edited the following ...
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2answers
12k views

Use of 'still' in present continuous tense

John is still reading the book. The above sentence looks odd to me. The use of 'still' in present continuous tense is not correct I guess? Right?
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4answers
247 views

What does one refer to?

Make new friends, but keep the old. One is silver, and the other gold. (A Korean middle school English textbook) Does one indicate new friends or any of both: new friends or the old ones?
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1k views

stunningly at the end of a sentence

David, john and others are looking outside through the window stunningly. Here I put 'stunningly' at the end of a sentence to indicate that they look something stunned. Is this correct?
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2answers
1k views

What does an “A/an before the comparative/superlative adjectives” change in the sentence, semantincally?

What is the difference when you use a/an before comparative/superlative adjectives and when you do not use it? Does it depend on the context or is there a grammatical rule? which one is correct? For ...
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1answer
46 views

“On the flatcar” versus “on to the flatcar” versus “on to flatcar” versus “on flatcar”

Mike helps John to get on the flatcar. Mike helps John to get on to the flatcar. Mike helps John to get on flatcar. Mike helps John to get on to flatcar. Mike helps John to get ...
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1answer
2k views

Best grammar-checking software [closed]

What is the best grammar-checking software to check the grammar errors in novels and screenplays? I heard about Grammarly and Whitesmoke but I'm not sure which is good.
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1answer
173 views

“Gave me one of the recipes that were/was”?

I know this is a common question on the web, but I still wasn't sure about this particular sentence. "She gave me one of the recipes that were/was in her personal cookbook." In this sentence, I'm ...
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5answers
12k views

Is “It is I who decides.” correct?

Google Translator translates c'est moi qui decide as "it is I who decides." I'm confused about "decides" being correct, since there is I before who. Is decides right, or should decide be used?
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2answers
5k views

“Have you ever read” versus “have you never read”

"Have you ever read Jane Jacobs's The Death and Life of Great American Cities?" he asked. (The New York Times) I don't know why, but if I wrote that question I would have used never, not ever, but, ...
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1answer
118 views

Should I use “was” or not?

I thought I was supposed to. He was served. The above two sentences are correct . Please explain me why the below sentence is wrong. What was happened to him?
2
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1answer
108 views

write form into cover letter [closed]

Today morning I have faced a viva-voce exam, and I did good in exam. How will I write this as formal cover-letter with 100 % Grammatically accuracy? What tense is good for mentioning this? past tense ...
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3answers
246 views

mixed functional and non-functional requirement

Some background: Functional requirement of a web service is concerned with the correctness of the web service's function, say the service will always return a number that is less than two. The non-...
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2answers
4k views

Verb tenses when using will/would?

I have a question regarding what verb tenses to use when using "will" and "would". So if I start my sentence using "will", do I need to stick to using will throughout my sentence? I was recently ...
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1answer
2k views

When and why do/does “staff” as a collective noun get plural/singular pronoun/verb?

I know that collective nouns such as staff, team, crew, and family can get both singular and plural pronouns/verbs in different situations and contexts, but my question is only about staff when used ...
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2answers
88 views

Can “relevant to” be replaced by “due to”?

In the following sentence, can "relevant to" be replaced by "due to"? Our modification addresses the problem relevant to disturbing objects attached to the main object. Our modification ...
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1answer
68 views

Correct usage of “which”

Am I using which correctly when combining the following sentences? The usage of normal vector for searching plane objects is introduced. The method is formed by seeking points representing a plane ...
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1answer
61 views

Is “in which” relevant here?

I am writing the following sentence. In contrast to the object modeling, (ABC et al., 2009) present an approach for urban object recognition using shape knowledge in which a set of features ...
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1answer
453 views

What is the difference between “can not” and “cannot”?

I have found both in texts of native English speakers but couldn't find the difference. In EL&U site people edited all my "can not" to cannot. So again I couldn't find out the matter. Which of ...
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2answers
1k views

Can the word “geek” be used as an adjective?

I'd like to know whether I should use the word "geek" as an adjective or noun?
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2answers
5k views

“Back in 2000 for example” or “for example, back in 2000”

I think the second sentence sounds nicer, but I was always taught that time should be at the beginning. So, what's right? Back in 2000 for example, I built a robot. For example, back in 2000, I built ...
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1answer
1k views

Should I use “have ” or “are” when asking the question?

Have we crossed the bridge? Are we cross the bridge? Is this your pen? Has this your pen?
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1answer
1k views

Should I use “kissed” or “kiss” in this sentence?

Should I use the simple past tense or the present tense? Would you mind very much if I kissed you? Would you mind very much if I kiss you?
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1answer
196 views

Is the structure of “a/an X kind of Y” correct? [closed]

Is this structure correct or not? An orange kind of morning is desired. Can I replace X with a noun like Europe,Japan,India etc. or not? For example: An India kind of morning is desired after ...
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2answers
966 views

How to say about your blood pressure?

Which of the following expressions is more correct or exposes a better English structure or grammar? My blood pressure is low/high. I suffer from/have low/high blood pressure? After some ...
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5answers
10k views

“For” versus “on” in the given sentence

I was shocked when my teacher told me that this sentence is wrong: Do not congratulate him for his success. Could anyone explain why we can't use for here? I know that on is another competitor. ...
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2answers
3k views

Plural or singular when comparing two different objects?

Should I use plural or singular when comparing two different objects? For example, I want to tell a friend that I have two clothes that are of different styles but have the same color. "The colors ...
3
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1answer
257 views

using plural nouns with plural nouns?

I wanted to say "Please take a look at the ones with check marks beside them". But I was kind of confused whether it is more correct to say "Please take a look at the ones with a check mark beside ...
2
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1answer
2k views

Can “is” be omitted in “is to be held on 14th April”?

While reading an article online I found a sentence: Combined Graduate Level Examination, 2013 is to be held on 14th April 2013 has been postponed and now will be held on 28th April 2013 (Sunday)...
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1answer
4k views

“Making sure you had gotten”

My friend asked me if I received an email she sent me last week, so I told her I did get it, but forgot to reply. She then told me this: "I was just making sure that you had gotten my email [...]" ...
2
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1answer
499 views

Can I use “I was wondering” with simple past

Can I use "I was wondering" with simple past? For example, I called my friend's house but his mom answered the phone. I introduced myself and asked her "I was wondering if he was available". Did I ...
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2answers
10k views

Would and could in the same sentence

I wanted to stress the importance of being bilingual to a friend, so I said "I wouldn't be able to speak to my parents if I couldn't speak Spanish". Is this grammatically correct? I've been saying ...
3
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2answers
128 views

Grammar about present tense in a conditional phrase

Which one is the correct one? If the worker [verb] something, the company will show something. If the worker [verb] something, the company shows something. The context is that I am writing ...
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3answers
105k views

When to use “be” in a sentence?

We'll be late! We'll late! You'll be so tired in the morning. You'll so tired in the morning. It will be very pleasant for you. It will very pleasant for you. I'll be all right. I'...
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3answers
137 views

Does using a colon (:) correctly combine these 2 sentences?

I'm asking about the following construction. I'm not sure whether the way I use a colon to combine my sentences is correct. Here, I would like to summarize the reasons for my extension request: ...
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1answer
3k views

What is the correct usage of “cause”?

Regarding the following construction Lengthy literature survey is mainly caused for this extension. I would like to ask: Do I correctly use "cause" in above sentence? What is the general rule ...
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2answers
478 views

Can we say “issues are not an obstacle”?

I just read an answer on Stack Exchange containing the following sentence. If these issues are not an obstacle, then […]. Is this grammatically correct? I think it should be rewritten as follows: ...
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2answers
271 views

I'd like to know which tense is appropriate

I'm confused which tense I should choose in the following sentence. I got an announcement from my school that I would be in charge of an additional class from next month. In this case, what should I ...
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2answers
165 views

How can I combine these sentences?

i am having following constructions my supervisor strongly recommend for an extension. I would like to apply for one year extension period. I have been granted a scholarship. Would the ...