Questions tagged [grammaticality]

Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of English grammar.

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2answers
271 views

Tense choice problem

I have to go to sleep because I have a class [-----] at 7:30 A.M. In the above sentence, which of the following fits correctly in the blank, and why? begin begins is beginning began
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“So as to” at the beginning of a sentence

Usually, in scientific literature I have found: In order to achieve something, we did something Is it possible to use the same construct with "so as to" ? So as to achieve something, we did ...
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1answer
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“Are” vs. “is” after “parents and the family”

I was reading the news on Yahoo and found a mistake (as per my opinion). I need your valuable feedback to make sure if it was a mistake or I am wrong! It is a paragraph on Yahoo. Please check and let ...
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3answers
866 views

Is this verbless clause 'when a student at Harvard' grammatically correct?

Someone mentioned that "with children's books and DVDs equally second at 20% each" in the following sentence from another question is a verbless adverbial clause. In 2005, fiction made up the ...
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“Come to mind” vs. “come to one's mind”

Which of the following phrases is correct: "to come to mind" or "to come to one's mind"? If both are possible, do they have the same meaning? If not, when should I use each of them? Would you ...
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1answer
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What's the role of “whatsoever” in this sentence?

Meanwhile, Cathy has become a prostitute at the most respectable brothel in the city of Salinas. She renames herself "Kate" and embarks on a devious – and successful – plan to ingratiate herself with ...
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'is used to thinking' vs. 'is used to think'

To an economist or a journalist who is used to thinking of a decade as long enough for entire theories to rise and fall, an age is the longest period imaginable; durable ideas can be age-old and this ...
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1answer
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Joining two sentences using “which”?

I have following constructions, The geometric reconstruction of the pentagon models is then performed using graph cut approach. The geometric reconstruction of the pentagon models can be ...
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3answers
204 views

Do I need “of” or not?

"There are 2 words one of which I don't know the meaning." "There are 2 words one of which I don't know the meaning of." Which one is correct and why? If one of them is at all correct.
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Two of it? Is it correct to say it?

As I was talking to one of my friends, I said this sentence. We will need two of it. I said it looking at the only glass cup I had. I was preparing for the party. Two of it struck me as extremely ...
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“Girls wearing glasses” vs. “Girls who wear glasses”

I'm having slight difficulties with a particular kind of sentences. I'd like you to check on my interpretation of differences occuring in the following sentences: A1. They're just a bunch of guys ...
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1answer
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Why is 'neither' (without 'nor') singular?

I ask about 'neither' as a determiner. I want to dredge below the last 5 paras under 'Tip 2' , which don't explain. Neither does p 90, A Student's Introduction to English Grammar (2005). Consider: 2. ...
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Double reported speech?

Is there such thing as a double reported speech? I told her that you told me that you won't come to class tomorrow. Here, I want to report to a friend that I reported her words to someone else, ...
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1answer
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“As follows”: Is “follow” here a verb or something else?

I failed to understand the grammatical structure in this pattern. The result is shown as follows: [Result] Is follow here a verb or something else? I don't know whether as do(es) is ...
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1answer
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“prize awarded him” vs. “prize awarded to him”

The verb award is ditransitive, Oxford Dictionary says: 1. [with two objects] Give or order the giving of (something) as an official payment, compensation, or prize to (someone) ‘The ...
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said something — no article requred in front of the expression?

Source: Microsoft Access VBA Programming for the Absolute Beginner The most common of table relationships is the one-to-many relationship, which is created by adding the primary key (one or more ...
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3answers
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Is “Poor them, who hate chocolates” grammatical?

Poor them, who hate chocolates. – V.V. This message was posted a bit ago on Language Overflow, and proved to be more interesting than usual. I wonder if it's grammatical, strictly speaking. ...
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235 views

Lying awoke in bed pleasant. Is this sentence grammatically correct?

I'm working with a book for English composition. The book suggests "Lying awoke in bed pleasant" as an answer for a question written in my language. But I think the sentence is grammatically ...
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Usage of “have got”

Can I use have got in sentences like these? My mother wants to have got a child (or) My mother wants to have a child. He may/might/could/can/should (modal verbs) have got a car (or) he (modal ...
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Is “ Are there the person who have a doller?” grammatically incorrect?

A person said " Are there the person who have a doller?" would be grammatically incorrect. Is this true?
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evaluates to be false vs evaluates to false

"The guard condition evaluates to be false" vs "The guard condition evaluates to false" Which one is grammatical?
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Is “these couple sentences” acceptable English?

Source: my own example Example: Hey, George, could you please review these couple sentences for accuracy for me? Do you think everything is okay with the grammar?
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“He committed a crime killing/by killing a bird”

Which wording with kill should be used here: He committed a crime (killing/by killing) a bird. My guess is the answer would be by killing. But I am really confused with the answer killing. My ...
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What is the difference between “he helped me out” and “he helped”?

What is the difference between he helped me out and he helped? In what context can we use them?
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Using the definite article with comparative adjectives

It appears that the stronger argument is in favour of grandparents living independently. We normally use the with superlative adjectives. Here the is used before stronger as a comparative adjective; ...
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Can a comparative adjective be used without having anything to compare it to?

In several languages one can use a construct such as I fixed a number of smaller mistakes. Would this be correct in English, or must I use "I fixed a number of small mistakes" because otherwise ...
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What does one refer to?

Make new friends, but keep the old. One is silver, and the other gold. (A Korean middle school English textbook) Does one indicate new friends or any of both: new friends or the old ones?
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“Seemed to had” is it correct?

Here's a sentence I made up: "He seemed to had not understood what I had said to him" Is this sentence correct? I tried searching for similar sentences by putting quotation marks around 'seemed to ...
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Should I use “important” or “importantly” in the introductory phase of a sentence?

Should I use important or importantly in the introductory clause of the second sentence: Appellant's argument is premature. More important, it lacks merit. Google NGram shows a significant ...
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Merely copying in this or that dictionary definition 'does not an answer make'

In one of my answers, I had only copy-pasted definitions from a dictionary so the moderator commented on my post and said: Merely copying in this or that dictionary definition does not an answer ...
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“being there such differences” - is this an acceptable turn of phrase?

All studies should be directed at identification of potential differences between a biosimilar drug and a reference drug, and on assessment of their significance (being there such differences). Is ...
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usage of themselves and reflexive pronouns

How are these sentences different in meaning ? Please explain me.I am very confused with it. They themselves cooked a meal. They cooked themselves a meal. They cooked a meal themselves.
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Why are “software”, “advice”, and “information” uncountable?

Sometimes in English I encounter words which are uncountable, while they may be countable in my native language causing some mistakes in my sentences, and I wonder why they are uncountable. For ...
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Should I use “has X years old” or “is X years old”?

Should I use 'has' or 'is'? My son has 21 years old. My son is 21 years old.
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Is “She dreams big.” correct?

Big is an adjective, which can not modify the verb dream. Can we use big here? She dreams big.
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That and those statements

I was wondering if all of the below are correct: That is the hat of that man. That is that man's hat. That hat is that of that man. That hat is the hat of that man. And same with the word "those": ...
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Use of indefinite article with relative clause

I posted a question quite long time ago asking whether "that was a day that my dog died" is valid. The answers said "no!", telling that a dog cannot die twice. I thought it was possible, for I ...
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They are shorter than me and lean

They are shorter than me and lean They are shorter than me and are lean They are shorter than me and they are lean Which one of this grammatically correct?
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“Three pair” vs. “three pairs”

Which one is more grammatically correct: "three pairs of shoes" or "three pair of shoes"?
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Best grammar-checking software [closed]

What is the best grammar-checking software to check the grammar errors in novels and screenplays? I heard about Grammarly and Whitesmoke but I'm not sure which is good.
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1answer
242 views

In the sentence “How did John do?”, should the verb “do” be replaced with “does”?

While giving my exam online, there was a comparison with John. There I found one sentence: How did John do? Is it right grammatically? I think John is one person so does should be used. Please ...
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what is the difference between 'easy to make' and 'easy to be made'?

I'll give you some examples The cocktail is easy to make with this bottle The cocktail is easy to be made with this bottle what is the difference between the two in meaning? and grammatically, the ...
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Comparing “more than” and “more than what”

Google Search shows 765,000,000 results for "more than what". So, assuming that A is "standard" English, I wonder if B is really acceptable, or not. A. I love English more than others do. B. I ...
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1answer
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Why “desert” in the following examples are used as uncountable?

Below are some dictionary examples in which the noun desert is used as an uncountable: this area of the country is mostly desert (Longman) drought and deforestation are turning fragile ...
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Prepositional complement (two - part question)

In grammar, a subject complement follows a copular and describes the subject of a clause. Although nouns, pronouns and noun phrases most frequently perform the function, prepositional phrases can also ...
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He pointed towards the outside of the room

He pointed towards the outside of the room I'm wondering if that's a grammatically correct sentence. It sounds a bit off, but after analysing it a bit, there doesn't seem to be anything wrong. He ...
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1answer
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Confusion regarding “confusion of”

I have a question regarding the title of this question: Confusion regarding “to doing something” vs. “to do something”. My initial thought as an ESL student was to use "Confusion about" instead of "...
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What is the grammatical function of “from across”?

In the following sentence what is the function of "from across"? Professionals from across the country are coming to London. I think it functions as a preposition but I'm not sure.
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1answer
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Should I say “A or B is” or “A or B are”?

The orange is selected if and only if the apple or grape is/are selected. May I ask whether using is or are is correct in the above sentence?
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Is the phrase “an I Can Read Book” correct?

I read this phrase on the top of the cover of a book: an I Can Read Book I wonder whether "I Can Read" can be used as an adjective without a hyphen.

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