Questions tagged [greetings]

For questions about formulas and forms of address used when meeting someone.

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2
votes
1answer
797 views

What to use to begin an email with if I don't know the name of the person reading [closed]

I want to write a letter to a company. Unfortunately I don't know the name of person who is responsible to respond to the email. In such a situation, I used to open my letter with "Dear Sir/Madam". Is ...
2
votes
1answer
9k views

What does “What's up?” mean? [duplicate]

I usually hear people ask others "What's up?" when they first meet each other. But what does this sentence mean? Does it mean "How are you?" or "What are you doing?' And if asked with such phrase,...
0
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1answer
2k views

How to address both males and females in a letter

How to write the address in a letter when the recipients of the letter are a combination of males and females? Imagine that you had a meeting with a couple of your colleagues, males and females and ...
0
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1answer
1k views

a comma after the closing in letters

When finishing the formal or informal letter is it necessary to use a comma after the closing? For example: Yours sincerely, X. Y. I have found both alternatives and I would like to know if there ...
0
votes
1answer
213 views

Would it be preferable to use “Dear Sir/Madam,” rather than “Dear,” to start an e-mail?

Are there specific cases where "Dear Sir/Madam," would be better then simpler "Dear," to start an e-mail? To give more context, I am preparing an e-mail to ask about eligibility for a certain job ...
0
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2answers
17k views

You've got a great smile vs You have a great smile

You've got a great smile vs You have a great smile which one is correct or better to use when I am trying to compliment a lady, and why is that?
1
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1answer
28k views

How to reply to “Good day, sir”?

How to reply to Good day, sir in the beginning of the conversation as a greeting?
2
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1answer
1k views

Usage of the word 'sir'

As I guess, the word 'sir' is to call a man whose position is higher or whose age is older. For example like school principal (and I am a student of the school). And one day when I was watching a ...
0
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3answers
668 views

Can “welcome” in context supersede the presence/absence of the auxiliary verb?

This is about whether you can use welcome in a "non standard (mistaken?) way" to mean the most usual meaning usually associated with it? The following casual examples will showcase what I mean: —...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

Do you 'greet' someone if you are coming to them?

Can 'greet' be used when someone is 'saying hello' to someone they are coming up to. I have seen it used in the opposite order, as in greeting a visitor. Can it also be used for the visitor? Examples:...
24
votes
4answers
15k views

Are “dude” and “man” disrespectful words?

What is the exact nuance of dude or man? I'm studying English from Japan. I want to know how people feel about dude or man. Is it just a friendly way to call close friends? Like addressing a ...
4
votes
1answer
3k views

Why is there a comma before “my friends” in this sentence?

In the sentence below, why is "my friends" set off with a comma? “It is a great misfortune to be alone, my friends; and it must be believed that solitude can quickly destroy reason.” ― Jules ...
6
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2answers
2k views

Is “thee” a more respectful way to refer to the person that the speaker is addressing?

For instance in text books -more precisely audiobooks- like Uncle Tom's Cabin, and some others that I can't recall now, I've heard the word "thee" when the speaker meant to say "you". I wonder if ...
4
votes
1answer
3k views

May I use 'Good job, sir' to appreciate my boss' work?

Somewhat, I feel it down using this sentence to our seniors, especially our boss. Good job, sir Or...for that sake.. Well done, sir I need natives' input for this. If I'm working for you/under ...
2
votes
1answer
360 views

Is “My name is …” still used in introduction today?

I'm sure that most people use I'm ... when he or she introduces himself/herself. However, I also know that in old days people use My name is ... in the same situation. Is this phrase still used today? ...
9
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3answers
27k views

Differences between “How are you?”, “How are you doing?” and “How do you do?”

What are the main differences between the three sentences written below? When should we use these greetings? How are you? How are you doing? How do you do?
1
vote
1answer
8k views

How you can say “Happy New Year” formally?

Good afternoon, I have to send an e-mail to my future traineeship's menthor and I don't know how I can write to her today in a formal way a Happy New Year's greeting. Thank you for your help.
17
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7answers
373k views

Responding to “It was nice to talk to you”

How can I reply to "It was nice to talk to you" properly both formally and casually? Actually, I want to make this question a bit general, but since I heard this sentence a lot I used it as an ...
6
votes
3answers
13k views

How do we address an unmarried old woman?

Say, Jeane is a 50 year old unmarried woman. And I insist on using titles. So, while talking about her with somebody else, shall I say, "This is Mrs. Jeane's house?" In writing, of course, we can use ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

Can I use “dear” and “darling” to address a friend who is older, younger or the same age as me?

Can I use "dear" and "darling" to address a friend who is older, younger or the same age as me? In one email I'll send to a friend who is older than me, can I say this? Dear, I know what you mean,...
5
votes
2answers
2k views

Is it awkward to say “Good morning” to roommate every day? [closed]

I know it is a bit weird to ask this question, yet in the country I am staying, China, people love to say "Good morning" to everyone every morning. I have never been to other countries except China ...
28
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7answers
167k views

What do they mean with “Hi, how are you doing”?

When I was in New York the workers at the counter (in a shop) always said Hi, how are you doing? I was, and still am very confused if they just mean "hello", or actually want to know how I feel. ...
2
votes
3answers
47k views

Glad or Nice to meet you?

Is there any difference between both expressions? Nice to meet you. and Glad to meet you. If yes, when or why use each one? Also, there are some variations as Nice to see you or Nice ...
4
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1answer
20k views

Can we use “dearest” to begin an informal letter?

"Dearest Marta, hi" Is it correct to begin an informal letter using "Dearest"?
2
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5answers
655 views

Proper greetings on the phone

English is my 2nd language and I need your advice on this little awkward moment I had with a lady on the phone today. She left a voice message so I was returning her call. Me: Hi. I'm ** returning ...
0
votes
2answers
5k views

“Dear students” and “dear colleagues”

When addressing students, can I use "dear students" instead of "ladies and gentlemen"? Likewise, can I address my colleagues as "dear colleagues"? If not, what is a valid alternative?
2
votes
3answers
7k views

How do we respectfully address kids whose names we don't know?

When it's about adults, we have plenty of choices... Mr., Ms., Mrs., or even Sir and Madam. But then what about kids? Kids aging 7 to 12 (approx). What about in our practice, a day-to-day practice? ...
3
votes
1answer
11k views

What should we greet a person at 10 o'clock in the night?

This actually had happened when I was about to relieve a medical officer from his duty at night. I was appointed for the night-shift and had to relieve my co-worker from his evening shift. Which way ...
3
votes
1answer
914 views

What is the meaning, usage and formality of the greeting “What's up”?

"What does it really mean when one asks - what’s up?" What should be my reply? What I am busy with or upto? I am assuming its informal usage. Also I doubt if one should use it in formal meetings. ...
2
votes
1answer
3k views

What's the best way to end an email/letter?

We end an email with several options. I find 'Regards' the best one. I feel anything other than this reflects affection than greeting! See the example: Sincerely yours (Yes, I don't pay heed to ...
5
votes
2answers
1k views

How to describe the following greeting gestures?

"Clasping hands" would fit all the 4 hand gestures but I want to differentiate between the four. I'm especially interested in how to describe the first picture. The context where I want to use this ...
5
votes
1answer
25k views

What is commonly used to respond “howdy howdy” greetings?

When people greet us by 'howdy howdy', what is the best reply to it? Is it also used in British English?
4
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2answers
34k views

What's the difference between “take it easy” and “take care” when you are parting from someone?

When I'm parting from someone, I say, "See you around." Sometimes I've heard people saying "Take it easy." or "Take care". What's the implication of these phrases? I understand that when I take an ...
10
votes
3answers
79k views

How to greet in email

In my opinion we should always have some type of greeting in every email. Whether it be "Hello (Name)" or "Good Afternoon (Name)" or simply "Dear (Name)", it is always nice to start your email off ...
3
votes
2answers
11k views

Does “see you later” imply “I will see you later this day”?

Suppose I meet somebody on Monday morning; when I am departing, I say "See you later." Does that mean I will see again that person during the day? If that is what would be understood, what should I ...
40
votes
6answers
52k views

Do you really answer “How do you do?” with “How do you do?”

I'm a non native speaker of English. In our learning we were told that when we say hello to someone we use equivalent phrase: How do you do? In response we do say: How do you do? But I'm ...
5
votes
4answers
1k views

How to address correctly: “Please someone …” or “Someone please …”?

How should one address a person or a group of people, for example, in a email conversation at the start of a sentence? Please somebody do something very simple if some simple condition. Somebody ...
14
votes
2answers
25k views

Addressing a group of women as “you guys”

The word "guy", in its singular form, is used to refer to a man, so it's gender specific. However, in colloquial language, you can also use the expression "you guys" to refer to a group of people. ...

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