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'Headlinese' is the very elliptical syntax employed in headlines, captions, titles, signs and labels in order to save space and permit larger characters in display.

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Possible meanings of a headline

I am a non-English speaker and am reading Essential English for Journalists, Editors and Writers. There is a headline that I can't understand, thus I can't see the problem of splitting the headline at ...
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Does “Pope to meet U.S. bishops” use the word “to” to emphasize?

Does this news article title use the word "to" to emphasize? Pope to meet U.S. bishops amid sex abuse scandal, allegations of Vatican coverup
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No food allowed

Can anyone explain grammar of sign “no food allowed”? I got the meaning but confused about grammar. Why not “no food is allowed” ?
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41 views

Grammar and be verbs

Sam and I at the club. Or Sam and I are at the club. Which one is correct for a photo caption? when someone says "where are you?"
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1k views

What does 'in first for' mean?

What does 'in first for' mean in the following sentence?: (It's a news article title.) In first for UK, government clears Cuadrilla to frack shale gas site (Source: Reuters) Now I presume that it ...
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72 views

Native reader's perception of headlinese in scientific papers

A fairly common English mistake I see on the part of ESL learners is the omission of articles. To avoid making this mistake, I tend to refrain from removing them if I'm not sure. However, in a flow-...
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2answers
62 views

Is “find” one of the linking verbs?

He found alive. This sentence was usually written on newspapers. I want to know "find" whether is a linking verb because following it being an adjective.
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“Compare with” or “Comparing with” on a title

I have a title which I am going to compare my approach with another approach namely X and highlight the advantages of my approach in the section. Which of the following is correct for the title? ...
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5answers
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Grammar of titles - wh-clause vs. question

I found an article with the title: Why We Listen to Music This seem somewhat incomplete to me, because "why we do something" is usually used as the subject of dependent clause like "This is why we ...
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47 views

What does “wrap” mean in this news headline?

U.S. Stocks Decline on Tepid Manufacturing Data: Markets Wrap (from Bloomberg News (Source)) What does "wrap" mean?
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54 views

Where is the verb “be” in “This page intentionally left blank”? [duplicate]

"This page intentionally left blank" is a common sentence at the start of books/documents. I know it is correct, but why is it not expressed as "This page has been initially left blank"? Is there a ...
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2answers
56 views

What does “unplugged” mean or imply in this headline?

What does "unplugged" mean or imply in the headline Trump unscripted and unplugged
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48 views

China Finance Minister or China's finance minister?

Today I was reading a newspaper and one thing bugged me that was the headline saying ''China finance minister sees more...''. I mean, isn't it going to be "China's finance minister" or either of them ...
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53 views

Meaning of 'subject + to + infinitive'?

Every now and then I find some articles' titles built up like this: "Trump to meet with game industry over gun violence next week" Well, I don't know how to find more information about this. I ...
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2answers
53 views

Is “gone” in the title of a youtube video “AUDITIONS GONE WRONG Angry Contestants” correct?

Below is a title of a youtube video. AUDITIONS GONE WRONG Angry Contestants & More | Idols Global The word I am suspicious about in the title is GONE. I know there are many expressions like "...
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1answer
44 views

What is the meaning of 'scare eases' in this headline?

Today I have come across the following headline on the main page of the Premier League website: Salah scare eases for managers. I did not understand what the writer means by 'scare ...
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2answers
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What does the Daily Mail's headline “inch ahead…” and “…a Marxist in No 10” mean?

from The Daily Mail, December 14, 2017 Just as the newly confident Tories inch ahead in the polls,11 self-consumed malcontents pull the rug from under our EU negotiators, betray their leader, party ...
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1answer
69 views

Can you have a sentence without a verb? [duplicate]

Where is the verb in this sentence below? No Small Business Brands On YouTube Does this sentence mean "There are no small business brands on YouTube"? If so, then why does the sentence "No smoking"...
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1answer
112 views

what is the meaning of 'Actresses are now casting the couch aside'?

What is the meaning of 'Actresses are now casting the couch aside'? Source: https://www.msn.com/en-in/news/other/actresses-are-now-casting-the-couch-aside/vp-BBwwpWg Cast aside means To ...
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2answers
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I to confirm with someone

I really often see phrases when after pronoun or someone's name follow infinitive. Examples: Alex to confirm with Dan I to make a text Peter to develop a code What does it mean? Is there should be ...
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27 views

many positions to fill?

I saw this ad, which I feel like is not good English. How does it sound to a native speaker? is it ok to say "many positions to fill" or is there another way to say it?
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1answer
66 views

The correct omission of the definite and indefinite articles [closed]

Given the following headline at Bloomberg.com: Verizon Explores Lower Price or Even Exit From Yahoo Deal My questions are: Why in this case the definite article is omitted before Yahoo Deal? E.g.,...
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1answer
48 views

Product descriptions without definite / indefinite articles

I have read a review on Amazon and most products descriptions are written without definite / indefinite articles. Does it happen because of headlinese? For instance, this is a part of the product ...
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3answers
108 views

“12-year-old boy changes his mind just two years later” — how old was he at that moment?

I've encountered an article from The Independent: 12-year-old boy who transitioned to female changes his mind just two years later Isn't it ambiguous, how old was he at that moment? Was he 12 when ...
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111 views

“Two [men] {get / were / got / } involved in a fistfight”

I saw this post title in Reuters Facebook page Two Ukrainian lawmakers get involved in a fistfight after one accuses the other of having ties to Russia https://www.facebook.com/Reuters/videos/...
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1answer
114 views

Article title without the definite article before the word best [duplicate]

I have learned that before phrases like the best, the latest, the smallest, etc, I have to use the definite article because the best is only one thing. Is this title of an article correct? ...
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Why is the word “for” missing in this sentence? [closed]

A Saudi Arabian person arrested uploading abuse video. I saw this line in some NEWS Channels scrolling. I am pretty sure word "for" is missing. Why there is no "for" used in between arrested and ...
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“How many billion” or “How many billions”?

I know that we have to use a plural noun after How many, and I also know that we have to say "five billion dollars", not "five billions dollars" (OALD) So why does the writer write like this: ...
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83 views

“Norway to ban full-face veil in nurseries, schools and universities” - is this correct? [duplicate]

Some minutes ago, I've seen news (here on BBC) where the title is: "Norway to ban full-face veil in nurseries, schools and universities" I understand that the meaning is "> "Norway is going to ...
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325 views

Why do we have to use 'to' instead of 'will'?

I saw the sentence like Donald Trump to run for president next month. in the newspaper on the internet. But I don't know why we have to use to instead of will. Is there any rule I don't know? ...
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88 views

Grammar behind “Trump Calls Quits On Paris Climate Deal”

We have the following headline: Trump Calls Quits On Paris Climate Deal What part of speech is 'quits'? Is it a verb or noun? What are the words left out and what is the grammar in general behind ...
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3answers
303 views

Singular and plural form in a section title

This is a quick short question, but it hinders me every time when I write a section title. For example, if I want to use a single word 'question' as a section title, should I use it in a singular form ...
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932 views

Starting question with “has”

What is the difference between Has he come? and Did he come? Is the headline of the linked article correct?
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Why do headlines contain articles when they shouldn't? [closed]

Why do we put articles in title or headings? What difference would it make to add the articles in "A bag of cookies" and "The bag of cookies"? Another example: The affection distorts the ...
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what is the “ordered” of “De Lima ordered arrested by RTC” in news headline [duplicate]

De Lima ordered arrested by RTC link From this answer I somewhat understand of Headlinese. However, I still don't understand ordered. I mean, I can understand was is omitted in following sentence. ...
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54 views

When should (shouldn't) we use indefinite article (a) with “statement”?

When should (shouldn't) we use indefinite article (a) with "statement"? Which one is correct? Arsenal know they have to make statement of intent at Manchester City. The Guardian Georginio ...
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501 views

“An end” or “the end” in titles

I would like to know why the article "an" is used in the title: An End, Once and for All (a song title off a video game soundtrack) However, The Beatles have a song called The End. And is ...
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55 views

What does the 'to' mean when the word is used in the newspaper? [duplicate]

I saw the sentence like 'The president to agree with the opinion.'in the news paper. I can understand the meaning of the 'to' in the sentence. Maybe I think that 'to' means 'will'. Am I right? If I am ...
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298 views

The zero article in ''Game of Thrones''

Why not: ''The Game of Thrones''? The noun ''game'' is countable, and I couldn't find the explanation looking into special rules and exceptions. Anyone has an idea? Thanks in advance.
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68 views

What does 'Singapore to shut down 2G network' mean? The structure seems strange to me

I was wondering what this sentence (Singapore to shut down 2G network) means: I assume what it means but I want to know exactly what it means . I've never seen such structure of a sentence.
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70 views

Bodybuilding Young Woman Beats Anorexia Through Exercise

Is this correct to say? Bodybuilding Young Woman Beats Anorexia Through Exercise. Or should I use it this way: Bodybuilding Young Woman Beats Anorexia With Exercise.
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What does “where” mean in the sentence “Where does Brexit leave Britain”

I cannot understand the meaning of the sentence: "Where does Brexit leave Britain" According to Wikipedia Brexit (like its early variant, Brixit)[3] is a portmanteau of "Britain" and "exit". The ...
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What does appointed mean in this sentence?

Tiwari, Rai appointed BJP’s Delhi and Bihar unit presidents From: "Tiwari, Rai appointed BJP’s Delhi and Bihar unit presidents" - The Hindu Here what I didn't understand is Tiwari,Rai appointed ...
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Can any one explain me the below phrase that contains 'too sees' what does that mean?

10th day of winter session too sees ruckus over demonetisation move. From: The Hindu, National News, November 30th What does this mean "too sees"? I didn't understand this phrase.
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53 views

About “Some Like It Bot”

This article has a strange title: Some Like It Bot Algorithms are getting better at entertaining us. Artificial intelligence has captured the rhythm of science fiction. For example, the ...
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652 views

“Remaining to wear” : odd choice of expression by the Daily Mail Online

From the Daily Mail Online The presenter, 45, was in high spirits as she took charge of Strictly Come Dancing spin-off It Takes Two - and baffled viewers by remaining to wear her wedding ring. The ...
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Does the sentence “More bad news in this city gripped by fear” lack a linking verb?

In the movie Zootopia, there is a sentence More bad news in this city gripped by fear. I figure we don’t need to know the context of the sentence because we all know that it means “The city ...
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102 views

Will this happen or is it a condition?

I read current news on Wikipedia and one headline for August 31, 2016 said: Mother Teresa of Calcutta is to be canonized into sainthood after "proof" of two miracles. For me it has two meanings. I ...
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263 views

What is the meaning of “told” here…?

Well, the full sentence is: Jeremy Corbyn told to 'sit down and shut up' in Commons as he criticises Iraq War after publication of Chilcot report I have the felling that the meaning of 'told' here is ...
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How can this head-line be interpreted as?

Here's the source. Clinton savors moment and 'a milestone' It means either 'she savored a moment and a milestone' or 'she savored a moment and it is a milestone'. The second one is like titles, "...