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Questions tagged [idiomatic-language]

is for questions about whether or not a particular phrase or sentence is a usual or common way that fluent English speakers might express something.

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1answer
14 views

What do we say when we ask for an opinion to everyone in a group except the guy who just answered?

Let's say we asked a question to a group of people and a person already answered. What do we say to ask the others to answer? I thought about "What about the others", but this sounds unnatural to me, ...
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1answer
19 views

Idiomatic way of saying “stick with crazy glue”

I am not sure if there's a better way of saying this, but "stick something onto something with crazy glue" neither does "stick something with crazy glue" or any variants thereof. Is there any better ...
3
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2answers
295 views

Fly on a jet pack vs fly with a jet pack?

Neither "fly on a jet pack" nor "fly with a jet pack" sounds idiomatic, are they? And are there better alternatives, because I can't really think of other ways of saying it. For example: I fly on ...
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3answers
60 views

Is there an idiom for a situation in which you get all the closed windows of your mind open?

I am stuck to express my feelings. I watched a video about business ideas and the speaker presented it so beautifully that I got so energized and it opened up so many new ideas to me. I am looking for ...
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3answers
47 views

An idiom/ idioms for a person who spends too much time on the cellphone?

Do we have any idioms for a person who spends too much time on the cellphone? As we call a person who watches television a lot, a couch potato, or a person who spends large amounts of leisure or ...
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1answer
18 views

purposeful VS motivated

Let's suppose someone has a goal and they work on achieving that goal. Would it be idiomatic to say: He is purposeful. He is motivated. Do these two phrases mean the same? If they don't, ...
3
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1answer
13 views

Is “to reach more” idiomatic?

Let's suppose someone's goal is to get a better job, better salary and so on. Would it be idiomatic for them to say: I want to reach more than I have now.
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1answer
33 views

What are some idiomatic way of saying “changing your face into someone else's face”?

One way I can think of saying this is saying "sculpt your face into a Harvey" or more generally "sculpt your face into a X" where X is a name of a specific person, like a celebrity, but I am not sure ...
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4answers
281 views

awkward or wrong?

This sentence sounds pretty awkward to me but I can't come up with an explanation. Could someone explain it? I wish to assure you that I should make every effort to be worthy of the confidence ...
3
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1answer
35 views

Is it “leave them to me” or “leave them with me”?

Leave your children with me, I know how to babysit. Leave your children to me, I know how to babysit. Which one of these sentences are grammatical? I am thinking that they are both pretty much ...
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2answers
47 views

Given the answer “It's my first time here”, what questions could I ask to receive that answer?

Confused by this question, I find it difficult to ask a question about a number of occasions (about a single occasion, in particular) when there is a specific answer expected. It's my first time in ...
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2answers
34 views

Is “follow their actions” semantically correct?

It doesn't sound idiomatic, but semantically it doesn't sound incorrect. The verb follow can have the following meaning: To take as a model or precedent; imitate: followed my example and ...
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1answer
17 views

How do we say “in all angles” idiomatically?

There's a sphere in all degrees of which there are smaller spheres, and thus forming a bigger sphere. "In all degrees of which" sounds non-idiomatic. I think it's correct and it's easy to ...
2
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1answer
27 views

Is “ask to join” and “ask if you can join” synonymous?

The student asked if he can join the basketball team. The student asked to join the basketball team. I am wondering if they mean pretty much the same thing. I think it means the same thing, but ...
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1answer
30 views

How to read PPP$? [closed]

How to read PPP$ aloud? Is it "purchasing power parity in US Dollar," or "purchasing power parity in terms of US Dollar," or ... ?
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3answers
25 views

I didn't feel like very much

The Poet says Four o'clock in the afternoon And I didn't feel like very much. and, while I have a grasp of the meaning (I know about the idiom "I don't feel like ..." and the context makes ...
2
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1answer
17 views

Is “whimper” the same as “say with pain”?

"How is this possible?" whimpered the old man. "I saw you die by the hands of our enemies. I thought you were a goner!" I am seriously wondering if you can use the verb whimper that way. I am ...
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1answer
25 views

Is “there is free refill on that” idiomatic?

I am not sure if this is idiomatic. The employee pumped petrol into the car and told the driver, who is a regular to the station, "there is free refill on that". Is it ok to say "on that"? The "...
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1answer
44 views

“She is very envious of you…” vs “She is very envious that you…”

I stumbled upon this ELL question where the OP had a sentence She is very envious that you have more money than she does. Out of curiosity, I was wondering if I could rewrite it to any of these ...
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1answer
34 views

A lot of public—why isn't it correct?

Why is the following not correct? There was a lot of public at the concert.
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1answer
13 views

to estimate time and labor efforts for a task completion

Could you please tell me whether the selected sentence Ability to estimate time and labor efforts for a task completion sounds natural? I don't want it to sound informal, instead I want it to be ...
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2answers
29 views

Are both “possible you” and “possible to” idiomatic?

I had a discussion with a co-worker at work and said something along the lines of: Doing this can hurt you in the long run, but it's also possible you gain confidence to do greater things through ...
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4answers
2k views

“on its way” vs. “in its way”

Is “the fire consumed everything on its way” correct? I thought "on its way" and "in its way" were pretty much equivalent in English and meant pretty much the same thing except in very rare cases. Am ...
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2answers
39 views

“Watching PewDiePie videos” or “Watching PewDiePie's videos”?

I saw both forms where the nickname of an user is used as an adjective, but which one(s) are idiomatic and why?
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4answers
549 views

Is “accuse people to be racist” grammatical?

I am not sure if you can use the infinitive here. I would rather say: Accuse people of being racist. The other question is if you can say: Accuse people of being racists. Accuse people ...
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1answer
20 views

Is “on the average” correct?

I just heard it on radio, but I am pretty sure that "on the average" is incorrect. On the average, the prices for cars will increase by 2 494$ if the tariffs against auto imports is implemented.
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1answer
16 views

Is “I put it in quotes” idiomatic?

I feel that it sounds weird although it should be ok. Is "I put it inside quotes" better? Why?
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3answers
2k views

Question: “Are you hungry?” Answer: “I feel like eating.”

I read a conversation book in which the answer for the question "Are you hungry?" was: "I feel like eating." My question if this phrase of "feeling like" when talking about a normal situation in ...
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1answer
29 views

to increase the quality code base

Is it idiomatic to say "to increase the quality of code base"? Like for example in the following sentence: The refactoring increased the quality of the project’s code base.
0
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1answer
30 views

How write about personal achievements? (tense choice) [closed]

Let's say I have to describe my personal achievements during my work in some project. What tense should I use - the simple past or the present perfect? The past simple Achievements: ...
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1answer
42 views

How to describe a translation of a holy scripture?

Which one sounds better? It is an English translated copy of Torah. It is a copy of Torah translated English. It is a copy of Torah translated in English.
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1answer
57 views

Is “different unknown fathers” grammatical?

I am not sure if I am crazy, but it doesn't sound grammatical to me. The children, all eight of them, had different unknown fathers. What's wrong and is there a word or phrase that mean the same ...
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2answers
20 views

“Listen to your songs on your music collection” or “listen to songs on your music collection”?

I am not sure where to put the word "your" and if you should put it twice. I want to listen to your songs on your music collection. I want to listen to songs on your music collection. I am ...
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2answers
34 views

When is “in finding” and “of finding” grammatical?

I heard that only the first is correct of the three: I am on the way to find you. I am on the way in finding you. I am on the way of finding you. Then why is the following from Social ...
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1answer
33 views

Does my reply sound idiomatic? [closed]

During a conversation with one of my friends; My friend: sends something offensive My friend: I could have unsent it Me: You should rather have unsent it than telling me you could've unsent it. ...
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1answer
16 views

Are “whereunto”, “in which” and “whereto” all synonymous?

This comes from Romantic Poets and the Culture of Posterity By Andrew Bennett: Let us conclude with the dignity and excellency of knowledge and learning in that whereunto man's nature doth most ...
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1answer
18 views

Does “not a few” always mean “a lot of”?

This excerpt come from Landmarks of English Literature by H. J. Nicoll: It is not to the credit of England that the only full survey of its literature possessing any high merit from a purely ...
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1answer
30 views

“If needed” Vs. “If it's needed”

What's more idiomatic in the following contexts? If needed, or "If it's needed". Here are some examples that I came across: I have an insurance for my country only. But I can buy another ...
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1answer
23 views

Is there a more natural way of saying “wind was created”?

I am not sure if you would agree with me, but "wind was created" doesn't sound idiomatic to me. Is there a better way to say it? Here's the example sentence: It doesn't matter the location where ...
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1answer
19 views

Does “I've got the following macro in the code” sound OK?

I wrote a question a few days ago starting like this: I've got the following macro in the code: I was meaning the code of a whole program. I also provided the code of the macro (kind of a function ...
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2answers
51 views

It suits him, to mean: That him to a tee

There are three people A, B and C. A makes a comment about a thing, this reminds B of a parson C. So he says: What you said suits C. (this means that what A said is exactly what C looks like, and ...
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2answers
51 views

Responding to ‘Is the price negotiable?’ [closed]

I have been selling some stuff on Gumtree, and nearly every potiential buyer has messaged me asking if my prices are negotiable. What are some common, idomatic responses native speakers use to ...
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1answer
25 views

What's the difference between “light up a lighter” and “light a lighter”

Is there any difference. It seems to me that "light up a lighter" means the same thing, but I've heard that they're not equivalent, and someone even told me it's not idiomatic.
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0answers
23 views

“Now things get much more interesting” VS “Now things are getting much more interesting” (tense choice)

How do natives say? Like this : "Now things get much more interesting" or like this : "Now things are getting much more interesting" or both variants are possible?
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1answer
29 views

Does the phrase “which may not seem like much of an [something]” sound natural?

Does the phrase "seem like much of an [something]" sound natural? For example: This might not seem like much of an improvement, but it is.
0
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1answer
20 views

“apply something to someone” or “use something with someone”?

Tell me please which phrasing sounds natural in the following context. The method of training I used with my client/I applied to my client was pretty challenging. Would it be more grammatical and ...
1
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1answer
30 views

“walking recovery in patients who suffered a stroke” or “the recovery of the ability to walk in patients who suffered a stroke”? [closed]

Tell me please which phrasing sounds more natural in the following context: The necessary information can be found in the article with the title WALKING RECOVERY IN PATIENTS WHO SUFFERED A STROKE. ...
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1answer
828 views

What do these phrases in the game of cricket mean?

I like watching cricket. I hear phrases like: He played a great innings and brought his team home. He remained there till the end to ensure he sees his team home. And: He is in the form of ...
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1answer
27 views

Is the phrase “benefit from experiences” idiomatic?

We can benefit from experiences of other developers. We can benefit from experiences of development. Is the selected phrase idiomatic?
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1answer
156 views

Weird Flex But Ok

What does "Weird Flex But Ok" mean? I looked up on the Internet but I couldn't get any more!