Questions tagged [idiomatic-language]

is for questions about whether or not a particular phrase or sentence is a usual or common way that fluent English speakers might express something.

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Should it be bachelor programme, bachelor's programme, bachelor program… or what?

Which of the following is/are correct: 1 a bachelor's programme 2 a bachelor's program 3 a bachelorprogram 4 a bachelor programme 5 a bachelor program Personally I'd go with (1) or possibly (4), ...
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¨be given out¨ meaning

The cricketer was given out leg before wicket. What is the meaning of the idiom ¨ be given out¨ in the sentence above?
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meaning: may well V

In the following exchange, "you may well ask" is used after a question has been asked. ‘What’s all the noise?’ ‘You may well ask.’ But I'm wondering whether "may well V" is normally used after the ...
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Is “the service *from which* custommers benefit” idiomatic?

Many English expressions are constituted of a verb with a preposition (from, to, etc.). Let's take to benefit from as an example: The customer benefits from a service. Say I now want to refer to ...
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Is it idiomatic to say “… posts titles of which contain …”

A post says I am trying to find my posts whose titles contain idiom ... I guess it's not grammatical to use "whose" there, as posts are not humankind. I would have said I am trying to find my ...
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Is it idiomatic to say “I don't know any other info about the narrator”?

An answerer asked in a post Is the narrator a native speaker The only thing I know about the narrator is that he is the narrator of that video, so I replied I don't know any other info about ...
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business-as-usual during the country lockdown

Is the following sentences grammatical and idiomatic? The company is still business-as-usual during the country lockdown. Is the company still business-as-usual during the country lockdown?
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Can “headfirst” be used in a positive sense?

Can I use head first, head-first or headfirst in a positive sense in a sentence like: He's not affraid of anything. He delved head first into his own bussiness. Thanks!
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Are these expressions only natural in written English?

She had a very sad expression on her face. She was wearing a very sad expression. Could you please tell me if the expressions above are natural to use in conversational English (if yes, are they ...
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Is it idiomatic to use a label of the size of an item of clothing as an adjective?

I'm looking for a size large sweater? Is it idiomatic to use a label of the size of an item of clothing as an adjective?
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Help Rectify vs Help Rectifying

It will be great if someone can help rectify it. It will be great if someone can help rectifying it. May I know which one above is grammatical?
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Is it idiomatic to say “grammatical and idiomatic”?

In my other post ("time adverbs" vs. "adverbs of time") I use these two examples The word already is a kind of time adverbs. The word already is a kind of adverbs of time. ...
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Is it idiomatic to say “I am here just to listen”?

Imagine that, my friends are talking about something. Because I know few about that topic. I want to just listening. I am here just listening. I am here just to listen. I am here just for listening....
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Is it idiomatic to say “the needed questions”?

An user issued a bug on meta.stackoverflow.com recently. I am using it a lot to find the needed questions. I guess the needed questions refer to the posts that they would need, might be useful or ...
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“is more commonly used” vs. “more common”

In my other post ("sound natural" vs. "to be natural") I said "sound natural" is more commonly used "is natural" Sometimes I also use more common. In the context of discussion ...
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“sound natural” vs. “is natural”

In my other post (Is it idiomatic to say "He doesn't drink much water at school"?) I quoted an expression. He doesn't drink much water at school. And asked whether the expression ...
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To the point of time

This closed-gap solution can help to bridge the gap between now to the point of time where the real solution is discovered. Is closed-gap solution the right word to use for tentative solution? Is ...
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The nutshell of the projeft

This is basically the nutshell of the project What I want to say is this is basically the summary of the project, is the above sentence grammatical and idiomatic?
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Is it idiomatic to say “I am also not sure”?

In my other post I said I am not sure if I did it in the right way... I am also not sure if I used the right term to refer to ... where I put an adverb also in there. I was trying to express my ...
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To level up the accuracy

That method can help you to level up the accuracy What I meant to say is that method can help you to improve the accuracy, is the sentence above grammatical and idiomatic?
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1answer
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Do you have any encountering

Do you have any encountering with C++? What I meant to say is do you have any coding experience with C++, is the sentence above grammatical and idiomatic?
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“to write things with” vs. “to write things”

Consider these examples This marker is used to write things with. This marker is used to write things. The former has an extra with. I guess both examples mean the same. The question ...
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Where should I place “only” in context?

A grammar book says I should place adverb between subject and main verb. So this should be right. When I was a student, I only pulled an all-nighter once. How about this one? When I was a ...
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Is it idiomatic to say “what do we say”?

A post From one side of the bridge to the other says But what do we say if we want to go from one side of the bridge to the other? I also found lots of people use this expression. Is it idiomatic ...
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Are “topic” “issue” and “subject” interchangeable in a classroom?

Cambridge Dictionary gives this definition about issue a subject or problem that people are thinking and talking about So, I guess "issue" and "subject" are interchangeable when talking about a ...
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Is it idiomatic to use past tense when making up scenarios?

I see a lot of people use present tense when making up scenarios to explain something. I also used present tense in another post to explain the usage of "how about/what about". Let's say A and B ...
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“at the beginning” vs. “at the start”?

I use the expression "at the beginning" a lot. And Google Ngram gives this plot So, is "at the beginning" more idiomatic than "at the start"?
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Is it idiomatic to say 'go on **the** ride'?

An ELU post says Go on a ride suggests having a thrilling experience at a theme park. Go for a ride suggests an excursion on a bicycle, a motor cycle or a horse. So, I am aware of the concept of '...
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Is it idiomatic to say “come out with me” to invite a friend

I see an example somewhere A: Can you come out with me for dinner at 7 in the evening? B: What about my English class that falls on the same time? I guess guy A is trying to invite guy B to hang ...
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the situation is not good

Is the following sentence, especially on the part the situation is not good, grammatical and idiomatic? if the situation is not good, please contact me.
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“go to the bathroom one time”, is it idiomatic to say that?

To describe How I was busy, I could say I worked the whole day. to emphasize the non stop work, I guess I could add more I worked the whole day, I didn't even go to the bathroom one time. or ...
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Is it idiomatic to say “He doesn't drink much water at school”?

In my another post ("Have you done a poo?" vs. "Did you poo?") I said He doesn't drink much water at school. Is it idiomatic? Does that sound natural? How about other ...
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Is it idiomatic to say “Pretend that I have a 10 year old son”?

In my another post ("Have you done a poo?" vs. "Did you poo?") I said Pretend that I have a 10 year old son. Is it idiomatic? Does that sound natural? Is it an appropriate ...
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Is it idiomatic to say “I've learned a lot”?

I guess it is idiomatic to use "learned a lot" to express gratefulness. And I found much more people using "learned a lot" than "have learned a lot". So, is it idiomatic to use "have learned a lot" ...
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Is it idiomatic to say “The sentence is stating a fact”?

The sun rises in the east, everyone knows it. When I say the sentence "The sun rises in the east", I am stating a fact. Is it idiomatic to say, The sentence is stating a fact. Although, it is ...
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“why could sth not be used as …”, is it an idiomatic expression?

In my another post ("only has" vs. "has only", when to use which?) I said This post is not a duplicate of ..., since that post does not explain why could "only" not be used as ...
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Is using “far away” and “far from” idiomatic when talking about the position of adverb?

Note: I am aware of the basic meaning and usage of far from and far away. This post is NOT duplicate of Use of 'Far' and 'Far away.'. Since the answer to that post does not mention ...
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“have a think, think about, consider”, are these all idiomatic for the beginning of a discussion?

My another post (It seems that using **even** sounds more idiomatic and natural in lots of situations, is it true?) starts with Consider these 2 sentences I guess I could also use these ...
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It seems that using **even** sounds more idiomatic and natural in lots of situations, is it true?

Consider these 2 sentences Alice's cooking is so bad that her dog doesn't want to eat it. Alice's cooking is so bad that even her dog doesn't want to eat it. The latter sounds more ...
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Is “still cannot” idiomatic?

In another post (Could some help analyze the structure of this sentence "Sleet is *rain and snow mixed together*"?) I said I still cannot get a completely clear understanding due to the ...
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Is it idiomatic to say “more complete”?

A meta post What are the reputation requirements for privileges on sites, and how do they differ per site? gives a list of reputation levels. I left a comment on that post Is it more complete if ...
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Is “complete list” idiomatic?

My another post uses the expression "complete list". A meta post uses "full list". So, I guess "full list" is idiomatic. The question is, Is "complete list" also idiomatic? Are those 2 ...
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gerund or if clause, when to use which?

In a question (The difference of a sentence with and without the phrase "in use") I said If I get rid of "in use", will the meaning be affected? I suppose the following expressions could ...
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1answer
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Is “this **type of** work” idiomatic?

I've read lots of posts that talk about "type of", "sort of" and "kind of". This post focuses on a particular scenario rather than a general discussion. I guess the following expression is ...
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Is it idiomatic to say “please always close the door behind you”?

my sister's bedroom is face to my bedroom and she play music loudly, which is disturbing me. So, I said to her, please always close the door behind you. I would like to have her remember this, and ...
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Takes awhile longer

I heard someone say It might take awhile longer for the document to be signed It might take a bit longer for the document to be signed Is it grammatical and idiomatic? What they meant is that ...
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Is it an idiomatic expression, “in a very near future”?

Oxford Dictionary (https://www.lexico.com/en/definition/just) gives a bunch of definitions about “just” one of those is 1.1 Exactly or almost exactly at this or that moment and gives this example ...
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The teacher gets through this chapter too fast

The teacher gets through this chapter too fast I want to say that the teacher has not covered the chapter in details, and get through it too fast. Is it idiomatic to for the sentence above?
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Ways to talk about the last 3 hours

Are all the following grammatical? and which one is the most natural? I haven't eaten anything for 3 hours. I haven't eaten anything over the last 3 hours. The last time I ate ...
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The usage of “also”: is it idiomatic put “also” at the end of a sentence in writing?

This video (https://youtu.be/38-K2rPu8fc?t=167) is talking about the usage of "also" and gives this example She wrote three emails to him but he didn't answer, he ignored her calls as well. And ...

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