Questions tagged [idiomatic-language]

is for questions about whether or not a particular phrase or sentence is a usual or common way that fluent English speakers might express something.

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1answer
11 views

Would all the suggestions be grammatical and natural to insert in my dialog?

A: I know what you're going through. B: You do? A: Yes. ______________________________. So if you ever want to talk, you can always come to me. Would all the suggestions below be grammatical and ...
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1answer
33 views

Have I phrased this naturally?

I'm on my way to a party which has been underway for a few hours already. Lili is going to be at the party too. Is the above phrased naturally if I know that Lili already is at the party that I'm on ...
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0answers
24 views

Can I say this?

If someone asks me: What were you doing in Italy? Can I answer this: I just needed to get a little away from everything. Is it perfectly natural?
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24 views

So I've been taking some time off from work to _______________

I recently got divorced from my wife of ten years, so I've been taking some time off from work to ____________________ To try and recover. To try and get back up again. To try and get back on track....
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1answer
22 views

Looking for other ways to say “I've experienced the same, I can understand”

There are many movies and tv shows I've heard them saying but can't remember or figure out the way how to express that I've experienced the same thing, so I can understand how it is I believe there ...
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22 views

“minced pork rice” or “braised pork rice”

I'm wondering whether the term "minced pork rice" or "braised pork rice" sounds like a natural English expression, or it sounds like a word-for-word translation from another ...
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1answer
17 views

Is “'cause” perfectly natural as a connector word here?

So if you ever wanna talk, or if there's anything else I can do, then don't hesitate to give me a call, okay? Anything. 'Cause I'd hate to see a good guy like you not being happy. Is 'Cause completely ...
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2answers
29 views

Idiomatic ways of expressing disagreement

Are there any idiomatic ways in english writting to express disagreement as regards someone's opinion? These are what i normally read: "i respectfully disagree" "With due respect, i ...
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2answers
27 views

You have no respect

Let's say someone has made me very angry, so I say: "You're rude. You have no respect. You're just a big idiot." Is it natural to say "You have no respect" without adding more to ...
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1answer
18 views

For all I know, he left last night

Are the following sentences both correct? If so, is there any difference? For all I know, he left last night. For all I know, he might have left last night.
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2answers
24 views

Come over here/Get over here

Come over here. Get over here. Do these mean the exact same with the only difference being that the second one sounds a little more like an order?
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1answer
17 views

Move off/Head off/Leave

Tom is at a party, hanging at the bar. A guy he knows, Matt, comes up to him to say hi. They talk, then - Matt: Well, it's good to see you again. Enjoy the party. Tom: Thank you. Matt moves off/heads ...
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0answers
28 views

Sarcastic response

Context: Someone has behaved in a very bad way at work and wants to apologize for it a few days later. He's talking to a coworker of his. Person: I hope you can forgive me. I bought some chocolates to ...
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1answer
28 views

Till (hell freezes over / a cold day in hell / sun sets in the east / pigs fly)

I was wondering whether any of the following sentences do not make a good sense to you or that phrasing or idiom sounds a little bizarre to you. Actually, whereas all of the following idioms indicate ...
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1answer
26 views

Luckily/fortunately

...but luckily/fortunately there was a lifeguard who saw what happened. Could anyone please tell me if luckily and fortunately are equally natural to use in contexts like this or if one of them is ...
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2answers
32 views

Am I missing something vs anything

"Am I missing something?" or "Am I missing anything?": I can see how there is a subtle difference in the meaning but is one of these idiomatic?
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2answers
28 views

I'm going to have to ask you again to

A man has left his seat and been told to go back to it, which he has done. The man has now left his seat again... Sir, I'm going to have to ask you again to go back to your seat. Is the sentence ...
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1answer
28 views

He is unathletically built [duplicate]

He is unathletically built. Is this description grammatical and natural? Is "unathletically" unidiomatic?
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0answers
18 views

In/During the lunch break [duplicate]

We got into a big fight. It happened in/during the lunch break, so everybody was there. Question 1: In North America is "lunch break" the natural term for the break at work around noon where ...
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0answers
21 views

Everyone at work

The cake is not just for Gina (a coworker of the speaker), it's for everyone at work, to apologize for my behavior the other day. Question: Is it clear that "at work" refers to the speakers ...
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2answers
28 views

Is “I lost it” clear without adding more to it?

I lost my temper and started yelling at them. It was unforgiveable. I lost it and I shouldn't have. Is the phrase "I lost it" clear without adding more to it? Is it perfectly natural to use ...
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0answers
18 views

Can we say, “And you?” or “You?” to a person that said “What’s up”?

As far as I know, we can say “How/What about you” to a person that said “What’s up” to us like in “Not much. How about you/What about you?” Is it also okay to say “You?” or “And you?” instead of “How ...
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1answer
21 views

Which of the combinations sounds more natural to your ear?

Which of the combinations in the sentence below sounds more natural to your ear? I felt disrespected so I just completely lost my cool and started yelling and screaming. (1) yelling and shouting. (2) ...
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2answers
26 views

I do have a certain experience with this

Is the highlighted part natural in the context? Woman - Is he going to be okay? Veterinarian - Yes, your dog will be fine. Woman - Are you sure? Veterinarian - Yes. Trust me, miss, I do have a certain ...
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1answer
17 views

Have I used “on behalf of” correctly and naturally?

My boss gave me a bouquet of flowers on behalf of the whole company. Is the use of "on behalf of" correct and natural here to mean that my boss gave me flowers which were from him and the ...
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1answer
31 views

Is “receive” natural in this context?

I was a big bully in school, and I haven't seen any of them since then, so I'm just a little nervous about how they're going to receive me. Is "receive" natural in this context? Is it formal?...
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3answers
665 views

Blue-white or white and blue?

What is the most natural way to describe the color of an object as a combination of blue and white? For example we prefer "black and white" to "white and black". Does it matter ...
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1answer
15 views

Are the phrases “comes down to” and “boils down to” interchangeble?

I do get the meaning of the phrases separately, but I would like to know if they can be used interchangeably at least in some scenarios.
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30 views

in what cases should I use “out of” instead of “from”?

I heard a lot of natives speakers use "out of" instead of "from" she is out of Mexico I want to know why do English speakers make that change
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1answer
28 views

To put something out of order unintentionally

What verbs would you use to convey the idea of someone having broken/putting something out of order. My car won't start! You /broke it/broke it down/put it out of order/ruined. My computer doesn't ...
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1answer
20 views

Can I use both “real” and “actual” in this dialog?

Dialog: Guy 1: I like to paint. Guy 2: Really? You paint? Guy 1: Yes. Guy 2: Okay. So... real / actual paintings? Guy 1: Yes, real / actual paintings. Guy 2 is very surprised to find out that Guy 1 ...
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1answer
13 views

Chase for/after x

He played basketball alone in the park to chase after new friendship. He played basketball alone in the park to chase for new friendship. None of them sound particularly correct, but I can't think of ...
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1answer
25 views

…but no matter “how”

A: Was she the one who left? B: Yeah, but it wasn't exactly a happy marriage. A: Okay. But no matter how, I guess a divorce is always difficult. B: Sure. Does it make sense to use "how" ...
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0answers
25 views

How did you cope/deal with

How did you cope/deal with the divorce? I am aware of the technical difference between using "cope with" and "deal with" but are they used interchangeably in a context like this? ...
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0answers
9 views

Work/Be working

You don't deserve to work for this great company. I hope they fire you. You don't deserve to be working for this great company. I hope they fire you. Which of the above sentences is more natural?
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0answers
39 views

Are the two sentences equally natural?

X: It wasn't exactly a happy marriage. Y (1): Okay. But no matter how, I guess a divorce is always difficult. Y (2): Okay. But I guess a divorce is always difficult no matter how. Are the two ...
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1answer
17 views

You want me to go/leave?

Two people are having dinner at a restaurant. They have a heated argument and... A: Maybe you should just go somewhere else. B: You want me to go/leave? In this context are "go" and "...
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2answers
29 views

Is it natural to say “You think it's going that bad”?

A: I think I'm just gonna go. B: You think it's going that bad, huh? A: Yes, I do. I tried searching "You think it's going that bad" on Google but it had no hits. Is it not natural at all?
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1answer
44 views

Is “Get well soon” a cliché?

Some say clichés are over-used terms. Are the following sentences cichés? If not, why? Get well soon! Wishing you a speedy recovery I hope you recover quickly
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1answer
22 views

I can sense that

I can sense that you think we had more to discuss. Is it perfectly natural to use "sense" here instead of "tell"?
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1answer
14 views

Emotion/Emotions

Mike got in the car and drove away. The sight of his dad's grave didn't seem to have brought out any emotion/emotions in him. Is "emotion" a fitting word to use in this context? If so, are ...
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1answer
22 views

How to express “smth has been leaking and is almost empty” in a shorter way?

Here is a situation: a bottle has been leaking water so it is almost empty. How can I express the situation without using the second part of the sentence (without "so it is almost empty")? ...
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2answers
30 views

Is “things” natural?

X: We have barely talked since the divorce. Y: Things are still complicated? X: Yes. Is Y's question natural (in particular "things") here?
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1answer
13 views

kick off - usage

If someone does something suddenly, is it correct to say that he did it "from a kick-off"? Another situation: if someone gets angry, is it correct to answer "don't kick off"? Thank ...
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1answer
16 views

Is “I think I could do it too” natural in this context?

A man is in a session with his therapist and very annoyed with him. Man: It's an easy job you've got, huh? Therapist: You think so? Man: Yeah. I think I could do it too. Therapist: You do? Man: ...
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1answer
17 views

Is the sentence “I went to the balcony.” grammatical and idiomatic?

I was in my room, then I went to the balcony. Does it need any preposition like "onto", "out to", "out onto", "out on" or "on" instead of "to&...
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4answers
2k views

“What does it sound like” vs “How does it sound like”

I'm currently doing a presentation and I have a slide where I show some speech examples from English speakers who have a certain type of pathological speech. I wrote the title "How does X speech ...
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1answer
30 views

“Usually” in the beginning of the sentence to achieve parallelism

Guard statements They’re usually useful, but there are also cases where they make the code less readable or at least give nothing. here goes an example Guard statements Usually, they’re useful, but ...
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2answers
23 views

for a long time

Jane: He's been pressuring me to see them for a long time. I have also been pressuring myself. It's just not that easy when you're not feeling well. (He = Jane's ex-husband) (Them = Jane's and her ex-...
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1answer
35 views

Talk to/with me

I just want to know what I've done since you suddenly don't want to talk to me anymore. Is "...talk to me..." natural if my intention with the sentence is this: "...since you suddenly ...

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