Questions tagged [idiomatic-language]

is for questions about whether or not a particular phrase or sentence is a usual or common way that fluent English speakers might express something.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0
votes
0answers
3 views

Is “there” omittable in this kind of sentence, “Have you ever wondered how many atoms are in a drop of water”?

This post says Have you ever wondered how many atoms are in a drop of water or how many molecules are in a single droplet? If I rewrite this as Have you ever wondered how many atoms are there in ...
0
votes
2answers
27 views

I got your message just now

Let's say I just turned on my computer, opened email and there is an unread message from my friend there - he sent it to me a few hours ago. First of all, I want to tell him that I didn't answer ...
1
vote
2answers
31 views

Backed up mail?

I'm working on a late Thank you email to my co-workers in response to the Get well soon card I got in the mail. Hi team, I got the backed up mail today from the mailbox and saw a very cool looking ...
0
votes
0answers
6 views

To ask about the process

I wish to confirm the process from the other party after I told them my assumption of the process. Are the following questions grammatical and idiomatic: Is it what the process should be? If ...
2
votes
1answer
34 views

Why study english?

Is the following grammatical and idiomatic (verb directly follow why) for both writing and speaking english Why study english? Why go home early? As I normally use the following format: ...
1
vote
0answers
14 views

addicted to drink coffee

Are the following sentences idiomatic and mean the same thing? I am addicted to drink coffee I am addicted to drinking coffee I am addicted to coffee drinking
0
votes
1answer
32 views

I can't survive without coffee everyday

I want to say that I need to drink coffee everyday, otherwise I can't survive. Is it idiomatic to say: It's not bearable for not having a coffee in a day; I can't go without coffee everyday; ...
0
votes
1answer
23 views

holes-in-her-purse bail meaning

In Breaking bad, when Hank was up against Walt, after everyone else was "out" in the game, he said the following: When old holes-in-her-purse bails, you know you're in deep. I know of money ...
0
votes
3answers
103 views

number to the number

In "Breaking bad" the recorded answering machine says: Yo, yo, yo, 1, 4, 8, 3 to the 3 to the 6 to the 9 representing the ABQ. What up, beyotch? Leave it at the tone. What does "to the" mean in ...
1
vote
1answer
33 views

“It was reported that..”, which is closer to this idiom: rumor or a fact?

I'm translating the 'Spectre (security vulnerability)' Wikipedia article to my mother tongue, and it contains a sentence like below; It was reported that Intel shared news of the Meltdown and ...
2
votes
1answer
32 views

How to ask about the last night sleeping, out of the following options - idiomatically?

In case of a couple lovers that slept together at night. Which phrase is more idiomatic to ask each other at the morning while waking up? Good morning honey:) How was your sleep (at night)? (sleep ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

the town of Castleford

From Cambridge dictionary: He was born in the small town of Castleford, in Yorkshire. I'm not sure whether I understand this correctly. Is it a town called "Castleford"? Or there is a bigger ...
0
votes
0answers
10 views

On the use of “by which to” in this sentence

The particle theory and the wave theory have been the only clearly defined models by which to describe light and its propagation. I found this sentence while reading a book on special relativity. ...
0
votes
1answer
15 views

Is it okay to say 'What's it like for them'?

Let's imagine I want to ask someone how do they feel about some situation or how do they live after something happened or even asking for opinion of some thing? Can I ask the question "What is it like ...
1
vote
2answers
55 views

Is it ok to say 'go Amazon shopping'?

I know that we can say go grocery shopping, go clothes shopping when you want to buy groceries and clothes. Can I say I am gonna go Amazon shopping when I want to buy stuff on Amazon? (I'm not ...
0
votes
1answer
28 views

“scene in” vs “scene from”

Do we say "best scene in the movie" or "best scene from the movie"? I feel like both are grammatical and idiomatic, but the second phrasing sounds better, but I was wondering if both were completely ...
1
vote
1answer
28 views

lost time and lost money

Are "lost time" and "lost money" common, idiomatic expressions? What article should be used with them? For example: Before starting to work you need to make sure all requirements are discussed. ...
0
votes
0answers
23 views

How do you reword this sentence into a shorter one

They need to develop the country into a secular and prosperous country for other countries to adopt as a model. I am not sure why, but the sentence sounds weird and ungrammatical. Is it grammatical?...
0
votes
0answers
11 views

the time the task is in progress

Let's suppose we are talking about managing a project, tracking progress of tasks: This chart is good, it shows which tasks are in progress and which ones are not started yet, but I also need to ...
0
votes
1answer
11 views

Is “fill in the variable with” idiomatic?

Is "fill in the variable with" idiomatic? For example: I didn't fill in the variable with a custom value yet, don't use it. I didn't fill in the variable with a custom function yet, don't use ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

How to say this naturally

When I meet a friend and I want to talk about a friends gathering that took place yesterday. We missed you yesterday. It was an awesome gathering, and it would have been far better with you. ...
0
votes
0answers
27 views

A good experience for\to a child

What is the right preposition in the following sentence: It was really enjoyable to fire an air rifle. It was a fantastic experience especially for\to a child. I mean something like: it was a ...
0
votes
1answer
28 views

What tense should come after “It was the first time”

I guess the direct answer is "past perfect", but I don't understand why. Given the following sentences: Newsweek: It was the first time my son had ever seen a homeless person It was the ...
1
vote
2answers
65 views

Is “He was killed by himself” correct?

(1) He killed himself. (2) He was killed by himself. Which one is better? If I want to passive 1st sentence is it correct to use 2nd one? If it is possible or not possible.
0
votes
0answers
23 views

provided desserts and drinks or served desserts and drinks

I don’t remember a lot of details about the event but I guess that as a child I liked the provided desserts and drinks. Is there a better word than provided? Can I use "served" instead? I wan't ...
1
vote
1answer
66 views

Which one is common “they are leftover cigarettes” or “they are cigarette butts”?

Look at this picture. Do we say "they are leftover cigarettes" or "they are cigarette butts"? leftover (adj): that has not been eaten or used at the end of something Use any leftover meat ...
0
votes
1answer
28 views

What is the way to say that something is common, believed, advised?

What is the way to say that something is common, recommended, advised? I've come up with the following phrase: It's considered that a good developer must know algorithms. Is it idiomatic?
1
vote
1answer
19 views

'the' or 'a' to indicate a specific data type (CS context)

I googled myself a little to see which article is more commonly used with types, and I understood one commonly uses a to indicate a general type such as integer. But what about a specific type such ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

afraid of the cold?

Is it natural to say people living in the tropical countries are typically "afraid of the cold," meaning they are not used to cold weather and find it uncomfortable? I'd appreciate your help.
1
vote
2answers
39 views

Scientific vocabulary for 'to remove flaws and make something complete'

There are tons of vocabularies related to this concept, such as strengthen, improve, or enhance, but I've never found one proper vocabulary for a scientific (or at least formal) usage with this ...
1
vote
1answer
28 views

Which is the appropriate preposition in “… and this has been well documented [in/by] Bryant (2010), Jordan (1998), and James (2016)”?

I have been wanting to ask this question for a while, but I am not sure if this would be on topic. But I really need a solution, so here goes. This is a sentence that I wrote: ... and this has ...
1
vote
3answers
162 views

Using “those” in comparison structures

The fuel tanks of 4*4 cars are larger than these of sedan cars. BBC News: New research shows that human "mini-brains" develop more slowly than those of other primates. The Guardian: ...
0
votes
1answer
13 views

What's the idiomatic phrase for the following situation (cut off vs. hang up)?

We have a group conversation (of 3 friends) on phone, after some time one of us was 'cut off' / 'hanged up' of the conversation. Which of them is more intended for unexpected or non-wished such ending ...
-1
votes
1answer
27 views

I think it's a manhood thing

I always wanted to buy a 4*4 car because it's safer and stronger. I think it's a manhood thing. I mean that men usually like big and strong things as it's part of their childish nature, and I'm not ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

Expressions to refer to some point in the future

Which of the following expressions is idiomatic and\or grammatical? I think I will be busy until I become 45 or something. By that time, my children will be mature enough to depend more on ...
1
vote
2answers
112 views

Is a plastic bag torn or ripped?

If we refer to a plastic bag (or fabric bag) that its content went outside due to a an heavy weight which the bag can't carry. Which one is more natural? The fruits fell down on the street's ...
1
vote
1answer
29 views

nobody Vs anybody Vs. nobody in a specific context

How to ask from a friend to not tell something / to keep something something in secret? If I want to choose between these two, which is natural or idiomatic? Please, don't tell it to anybody. ...
0
votes
0answers
28 views

What does “make oneself heard above the chatter” mean?

Example sentences: Many people are glad to have someone who can make themselves heard above the chatter. How can you make yourself heard above the chatter? I know the meaning of every single ...
0
votes
1answer
29 views

The grammar lying under “I'm no Superman.”

I'm living in a non-English-speaking country, so I usually contact English only through mass media (drama, for example). I've seen some use cases where no is used as if it's interchangeable to not a, ...
0
votes
2answers
32 views

Alternative expressions for “there's a possibility of something”

I usually say "there is a possibility of ..." to describe something that can still happen anytime later, but I don't think this is the only way to describe it. The problem is that, while searching ...
0
votes
2answers
126 views

“Look at there!” or “Look there!”?

Which of the orders is more idiomatic "Look at there!" (see this thing there) or "Look there!" (see this thing there) ?
0
votes
0answers
16 views

Can the word “Intense” be used in this context? [duplicate]

"He's here all by himself it seems. He's on the fifth drink or something since we got here. It looks pretty intense. Maybe we should go talk to him." Can I use the word intense here, what do you ...
0
votes
0answers
36 views

OK or very strange? [duplicate]

"He's on the fifth drink or something since we got here. It looks pretty intense. Maybe we should go talk to him." Is the line in bold OK or very strange?
0
votes
2answers
46 views

Is this a correct expression in English?

Once, my friend and I wanted to go to some place, so we took a tram (train) to reach this place but we missed our destination twice, forward and backward, because we were busy talking to each ...
0
votes
0answers
20 views

“On the ground further ahead” or “Further ahead on the ground”?

The mafia people throw the dead guy off the rooftop. On the parking lot below, Mia, heading for the building, is busy checking messages on her phone. She doesn't see the body drop/crash down on the ...
-2
votes
2answers
46 views

Is it ok to say 'come out as a winner'? [closed]

Grammatically, semantically, there seems to be nothing wrong with it, but Google News finds only several thousand search results. Why? (please, don't ask for context, it's perfectly clear as it is)
0
votes
0answers
36 views

To go off of something meaning

I hear this a lot especially in group discussions when someone says, "Going off of [an earlier comment],[I want to say that]..." I've also heard "I want to bounce off of [another person's point and ...
0
votes
0answers
18 views

Can square mean a reounded number?

Can square mean a rounded number as in "Can you knock 50 dollars off the price and make it a thousand dollars square"? The seller is asking 1050 dollar for the merchandize and the buyer is trying to ...
0
votes
1answer
51 views

Is it natural to say “I’d like a…” when ordering from a restaurant?

If ordering from a restaurant over the phone are the phrases written in bold completely natural in the context? Me: "Hi, I'd like to order a cheese burger..." Restaurant guy: "A cheese ...
0
votes
1answer
52 views

How natural for Native English Speakers these phrases and how to recognize it in advance?

I'm using Mark Skipper Advanced book and there are some phrases which in my opinion are strange. Do you use the following phrases in your speech (books, films, etc.) today? Are they common/relevant? ...