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Questions tagged [idiomatic-language]

is for questions about whether or not a particular phrase or sentence is a usual or common way that fluent English speakers might express something.

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1answer
22 views

Is the phrase “benefit from experiences” idiomatic?

We can benefit from experiences of other developers. We can benefit from experiences of development. Is the selected phrase idiomatic?
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1answer
33 views

Weird Flex But Ok

What does "Weird Flex But Ok" mean? I looked up on the Internet but I couldn't get any more!
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2answers
32 views

Using “almost” in a sentence

Which one of the following 2 sentences is grammatically/ idiomatically more correct: "She is almost a real fan of the jazz band." "She is an almost real fan of the jazz band" Tnx!
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1answer
30 views

Meaning of “manually” in “manually detect copyright infringement”

I saw AngryJoe, Youtuber, use this phrasing: manually detect copyright infringement This sounds wrong to me. I thought "manual" meant "done with the hands". How can you manually detect something ...
0
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1answer
26 views

Should “get back to the old times” be taken literally or figuratively?

When we say "get back to the old times" it sounds like we mean go back in time with a time machine, but often it seems to be used figuratively? Is it one or the other, or something else (neither ...
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2answers
25 views

specific details, concrete description [closed]

How to say that specific, concrete details are not required? Please avoid specific details and provide just a general description. Please avoid concrete details and provide just a general ...
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2answers
30 views

goes here vs is going here

Sometimes I see the phrase goes here when for example someone wants to avoid a concrete details and just puts a general description marked with this phrase. For example I've just asked another ...
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0answers
28 views

include but are not limited to

Does the bold part of the sentence sound idiomatic for native English speakers? The flaws include but are not limited to defect of this, defect of that, ...
0
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1answer
49 views

How to use purple correctly in my sentence

I would like to explain that there is a limited type of an object. For example, suppose that I have an object. Suppose further that the color of this object is very limited, for example, 2 colors only....
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2answers
12 views

Knowledge we pass / give / transfer / convey further?

When talking about knowledge which verb is more idiomatic and sounds more natural with it? I'll pass my knowledge to you, my students. We pass our knowledge (further) to the next generations. ...
0
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1answer
17 views

Whether + simple present or present continuous?

I was writing a comment that briefly describes what a function actually does in my source code, and stumbled upon a grammar question below. This function verifies whether the data is abiding by the ...
0
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1answer
28 views

“the shadow of a doubt” or “a shadow of a doubt” or “shadow of doubt”

It seems all these three versions are in use: "the shadow of a doubt", "a shadow of a doubt", and "shadow of doubt", as suggested by Google Dictionary and Google search results. Google Dictionary (...
0
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1answer
28 views

Any difference between “That would be mine” and “It would be mine”?

In a movie scene, a lady is with 3 others and are chatting. Suddenly, the lady finds a piece of hair on the ground. She picks it up and holds it in her hand and asks 3 others. - "Hmmm, whose hair is ...
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2answers
38 views

UK: Is “How do you do?” overly formal in these business situations?

I have learned that "How do you do? is very formal and is not used very much, especially by younger people, these days." (source: BBC — Learning English). I would still like to know if using "How do ...
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1answer
41 views

Is this correct?- He is still working here for the last 3 years

Is the below sentence correct? He is still working here for the last 3 years. Without a second thought, I typed in an important form as below- He has been & still working here for the last ...
1
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1answer
35 views

Poor aesthetic judgement

Is there a way to say that someone has a very poor aesthetic judgement? For example, you go to a house and you think everything is tacky or just ugly. How can you call the owner of the house? I tend ...
0
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1answer
52 views

Does idiomatic language improve my speaking score in IELTS?

If I use a very idiomatic language in speaking test, I gain point or lose point? For example suppose instead of saying: Medical graduates are considered the best in our university. I say: ...
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1answer
14 views

I read (it all/all of this story)?

Which is more idiomatic? I read (it all/all of this story), therefore I'm gonna talking about the whole story.
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2answers
38 views

Is it idiomatic to say in detail with information?

I want his information in detail Doesn't information itself mean details? I wonder if it's idiomatic or not?
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1answer
49 views

Is your coffee bottomless?

Which of the following is more natural for a customer to use at a coffee shop? a. Do you offer free refills on coffee? b. Is your coffee bottomless?
8
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3answers
1k views

“I'd like to have something to drink” vs “I'd like to drink something”

What differences in meaning between this: I'd like to have something to drink. and this: I'd like to drink something. I'm listening English audio course, and there are used "to have something ...
0
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1answer
51 views

collect/charge/receive money

First of all, I think it is worthwhile to mention that "What is nanny state?" Well, nanny state is a conservative term that conveys a view that a government or its policies are overprotective. The ...
1
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1answer
50 views

Which word is most common in everyday language for an electrical outlet - “socket”, “outlet”, or “plug”?

In everyday language, which standalone word denominates it best? "Socket", "Outlet" or "Plug"?
3
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2answers
754 views

Here's a bunch of versions of the word “smuggler's boat”. Please tell me which one is best or normal

As we English learners do, I fed words to google to find the most popular variation. This is what I ended up with: Word: Result count: A "smuggle boat" 56 B "smuggle ship" ...
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1answer
27 views

Is the usage of “ruling” in this case idiomatic?

Here is a sentence I wrote: In 1937, the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council struck down Bennett’s New Deal legislation, ruling the reforms unconstitutional and outside of federal jurisdiction (...
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1answer
185 views

A person working at a job for the longest period of time

How can I refer to a person who is working at a job for the longest period of time. For example, imagine there are 10 people who work at the same office and one of them, let's say Amanda, has been ...
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2answers
54 views

Is “to pull marks” a valid phrase?

[...] in the paper, there happens to be an entire section that is dedicated to creative writing. The section usually consists of 3-4 options for a creative writing task. Each option gives a topic/...
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1answer
53 views

Correct way to say that my house was robbed

My house has been robbed recently and from my new job I am getting a Laptop (MacBook). But I am afraid to take such a valuable piece of equipment after the break in. Taking these things into account I ...
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1answer
251 views

Would you mind if I + past simple/base form (When you want to ask for permission to say something in the class)

My first question is: What are we talking about, Present or Future? Student: Excuse me sir, would you mind if I say something? Teacher: No, I wouldn't. What's the matter? ...
1
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1answer
42 views

Which tense to use for a permanent change?

Some activities may change or resume, Which tense is better to use in such cases? Here are some examples. I used to smoke but I don't smoke now. or ... I am not smoking now. I know you never ...
2
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2answers
459 views

Job was completed, job has completed and job has been completed?

I have written an email which I believe the sentence was incorrect. Mr. A, Mowing at the job site has completed. It could be better if I say: "Mowing was completed at the job site" or "mowing has ...
1
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1answer
58 views

Is “get something straight for” an idiom?

He really needed to get his accent straight for, although in Europe he was considered something of a prodigy in Persian, South Asians found Jones impossible to understand when he spoke to them in that ...
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2answers
208 views

What's the proper way to ask if you're expected to go to a meeting? [closed]

I received an e-mail in which I was CC'd by my boss. In it is a timetable of meetings and shoots. I'm the junior of a 4-man team so I don't really expect to be part of these meetings but since I ...
7
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2answers
2k views

Why so many verbs in this sentence in the published book?

There is a bird on the lawn that I think must be a nightingale come over on the Cunard or White Star Line. (The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald, emphasis added) Isn't it better to write "there ...
3
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1answer
131 views

“From 4 years out” meaning

I was listening to NPR where Michele Krebs the executive analyst of autotrader came on to be interviewed on "How the auto industry is reacting to the tentative US-Mexico trade deal". The program was ...
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3answers
65 views

Does the sentence sound “I am an introvert with a bit pessimistic views of things” natural?

I am an introvert with a bit pessimistic views of things. As pointed out by @Tᴚoɯɐuo in this thread, the part "with a bit pessimistic views of things" doesn't look idiomatic. I am an introvert, ...
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1answer
21 views

When did “reinvent myself” come into use? Was there a belief a person could do that for many decades? It seems a new bilief to me

When did “reinvent myself” come into use? Was there a belief a person could do that for many decades? It seems a new bilief to me I think it is a falsehood Is there debate? Thanks! Elizabeth
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2answers
79 views

I wanted to know whether there are some similar English idioms for this Persian Idiom or not?(look at the definition)

There is an idiom in Persian (I translated it in English) and also I wrote its meaning. I wanted to know whether there are some similar English idioms for this Persian Idiom or not? PERSIAN: ...
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1answer
30 views

… results in lower evaluation measures

A sentence like ... results in lower evaluation measures seems OK to me, but Google didn't find even a single result for "in lower evaluation measures". Is there any problem with the construction?...
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2answers
56 views

idiomatic ways to express that “I don't want to force you to do this, so please don't be nervous or feel presured”

If I ask a friend (or a professor asks a student or a boss asks an employee) to do something for me and I don't want to let him feel that I am forcing him to do so and I won't be upset if he fails to ...
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3answers
84 views

more informal synonym for “compose one's thoughts?”

Is there a more informal and idiomatic synonym for compose/collect/organize one's thoughts? I was thinking of "get my thoughts/ it/ my head together" or "get my thoughts in order"- are these ...
0
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1answer
22 views

To come short of something

Can I use to come short in the following context? If we come short of snacks and refreshments, I'll pick up a watermelon. I know that to come up short is used when talking about not meeting ...
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2answers
118 views

Not everything what appears so is chocolate.

Not everything what appears so is chocolate. I am not sure if the sentence above is OK. Does it make sense to a native speaker?
4
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1answer
155 views

They can take our lives, but they will never take our hats!

"They can take our lives, but they'll never take our hats" What is the meaning of this? Is this an idiom?
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1answer
27 views

In The Context In Which-> Any replacement?

I have this sentence: "Many people's personal information on the internet has been stolen by hackers. In this context, we can build a better security software to combat the problem". However I ...
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1answer
25 views

What does “of continuing scientifc utility” mean exactly?

Tragically, the specimens still missing as a result of the theft are vanishingly unlikely to be in a physical state, or attached to data, that would make them of continuing scientific utility. (source)...
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0answers
22 views

“This time of year” v “this time of the year”

It seems to me "this time of year" is the idiomatic and common phrase of the two. Why is "this time of the year" wrong? Isn't there a song by Andy Williams called It's the Most Wonderful Time of the ...
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3answers
130 views

A word for something that is too visible?

How to call something/someone that is too visible, more that it/she should or deserves, or more than it is natural and accepted? The word I have in mind is "over-visible". Are over-visible and over-...
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1answer
41 views

“Taken out to the medowlands” what does this mean?

Watching an interview with Anthony Bourdain and he says the following, Interviewer: "Have you ever fired anyone?" Anthony: "... I'd go to the hiring person (female) and say, 'Pauly', I don't wanna ...
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7answers
181 views

The ground is going to fall apart/crumble

Let's say a heavy rain is going on: The torrential downpour has loud-banging sound because of thunder that is so intense the air waves from it seem to slam the ground, like it is going to fall ...