Questions tagged [idioms]

Use the idiom tag for questions which a dictionary cannot answer about set phrases with unusual meanings that can't be properly understood just from the separate words in them.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
3 votes
4 answers
915 views

graphic design is my passion so you are(is it true?)

Hi I want to say that "graphic design is my passion and you are my passion too" but in a shorter way. Can I say "graphic design is my passion, so you are." or "graphic design ...
sümeyyeTheGmc's user avatar
-1 votes
0 answers
35 views

Could you give some examples where the part following "nothing but" is omitted?

M-W says anything but idiom : not at all He looked anything but happy. **Though he said he was happy, he looked anything but.** This problem is anything but new. Is the highlighted example actually ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 3,289
0 votes
0 answers
62 views

What does it mean "to have your feet on backwards"?

I came across the following saying: The people who use this tool have their feet on backwards. That way they think they are walking forward, but are really walking backward. What is the meaning of &...
Vitalizzare's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
42 views

Difference between "at the drop of a hat" and "in no time"

Are there any differences in the meaning of or when we use the idioms 'at the drop of a hat' and 'in no time'? The definitions in the Collins Dictionary are: at the drop of a hat: If you say that you ...
Mohamad Mohseni Ahuii's user avatar
-2 votes
1 answer
66 views

What does "I think the night hits in the post" mean? [closed]

I think the knight hits in the post Link (last sentence of the video)
Kaveh Behnia 's user avatar
20 votes
3 answers
4k views

Why "having something UP one's sleeve," not "having something IN one's sleeve"?

I learned a new idiom: "having something up one's sleeve," which means to have secret plans or ideas. This idiom is from the practice of magicians hiding tricks or gimmicks IN the sleeve, ...
rei727's user avatar
  • 313
0 votes
2 answers
56 views

"I've been to see the manager" -- meaning of "been to see"

What does "been to see" in this excerpt from a listening test mean? Tutor: Hello Sam, come in and sit down ... Sam: Thanks. Tutor: You’re here to discuss your company-based IT project aren’...
hhhh's user avatar
  • 179
3 votes
3 answers
2k views

Allow troops to "shoot the hostages free"?

I get stuck (and shocked) by the expression 'shoot the hostages free', in the following context from Never Split the Difference: But until the Nixon administration, hostage negotiating as a process ...
Lerner Zhang's user avatar
  • 3,293
-1 votes
1 answer
54 views

What is the exact meaning of "cut into" in "I just cut into him" from the movie Sting?

What is the exact meaning of "cut into" in "I just cut into him" from the movie Sting? Here is the excerpt. Luther. Good God! We're millionaires. Jesus! Did you know he was that ...
user1026669's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
73 views

What is the meaning of 'run with' in "I wouldn't run with that nickname."?

I am watching the "Emily in Paris" Season 3, Episode 7. What is the meaning of 'run with' in "I wouldn't run with that nickname."? The following is an excerpt. Gabriel: Bonjour, ...
user1026669's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
13 views

"Have those off you" in context of an item/sale - does it imply free or purchased?

I was having a discussion with my wife, and I mentioned "X has already stated he will have X off us", in context of a batch purchase/subscription purchase. I have grown up used to that ...
user avatar
13 votes
3 answers
4k views

What Does 'It's on' Mean When Used in Anger?

I often hear the phrase "It's on" in conversations, particularly in situations filled with anger or confrontation. Could someone explain what this phrase means in such contexts? Is it always ...
Iman Mohammadi's user avatar
5 votes
3 answers
808 views

Her memory is like an elephant's (memory)

A grammar book for Japanese high school students gives the following example sentence: Her memory is like an elephant's (memory). Question: Is "Somebody's memory is like an elephant's" an ...
Kaguyahime's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
44 views

The workers balloted for a strike

The workers balloted for a strike. Does thhis sentence mean The workers — balloted to decide on whether to go on a strike or not, balloted and the result was to go on a strike (approved of a strike)...
gomadeng's user avatar
  • 4,258
0 votes
2 answers
55 views

Why does "depth" have to be in its plural form in these sentences?

Why is there an "s" after the word "depth" in these sentences? Is it grammatically wrong if I remove the "s"? Alvin can dive to ocean depths of 20,000 feet. (For ...
hhhh's user avatar
  • 179
1 vote
2 answers
572 views

Climbing without moving, how do you say that?

Climbing without moving, how do you say that? Running without moving on a treadmil would be running in place, but climbing on a sort of treadmill would be climbing in place? Is that an idiom, or there'...
Sayaman's user avatar
  • 13.5k
1 vote
2 answers
106 views

What's meant by ". . . he went the pace extraordinary"? (go the pace ?)

(From The Wrecker by Robert Louis Stevenson and Lloyd Osbourne, Chapter XX, published 1892) Passage 319 But before he was out of long clothes, the cloven foot began to show; he proved to be no ...
philphil's user avatar
  • 719
1 vote
2 answers
186 views

Politicians talk too much

There's this sentence : "some people think Chicago's nickname is from politicians who talk too much I need to know what is the meaning of politicians talk too much And why politicians?
Afaq Nafar's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
51 views

What does "You need to keep your brain at the top of its game" mean?

When you’re on a complex task, keep your brain at the top of its game: dump all important stuff on paper. I don't know what it means (I searched in many different english dictionaries). Translator ...
Тимофей Главицкий's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
103 views

How does it really feel when people say "thank you for your patience" to their clients in English? [closed]

Yesterday I invited a client twice. For the first appointment I made, the client met with me but we could not complete our task due to lack of preparation. So the client left and I made the second ...
Stats Cruncher's user avatar
-2 votes
1 answer
97 views

pinch out vs. peter out [closed]

I would like to know what phrasing is the correct geological technical term for a lode or ore vein that grows narrower and narrower till it narrows down to nothing - is it pinch out or peter out? (...
philphil's user avatar
  • 719
1 vote
1 answer
102 views

The lead has pinched right out

(From The Wrecker by Robert Louis Stevenson and Lloyd Osbourne, Chapter XVI, published 1892) Passage 251 “This is the end of me commercially. I give up; my nerve is gone. I suppose I ought to be glad;...
philphil's user avatar
  • 719
6 votes
4 answers
1k views

Meaning of "That was a home word of Pinkerton's"

(From The Wrecker by Robert Louis Stevenson and Lloyd Osbourne, Chapter XV, published 1892) Passage 232 THE CARGO OF THE “FLYING SCUD.” In my early days I was a man, the most wedded to his idols of ...
philphil's user avatar
  • 719
0 votes
1 answer
37 views

Does "race against" mean "sail"?

High clouds raced against the sky American chapters, The storm, Greta Gorsuch Does "race against" mean "sail" in this context?
ben_mb's user avatar
  • 91
-2 votes
1 answer
81 views

What does "rogue for faith" mean?

It's definitely some kind of an idiom. But i haven't clue what does "rogue for faith" mean. Sry for the lack of additional information. Yes it's from Barry Lyndon. And it was pronounced ...
Strider1996's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
63 views

What does "pleasant rattle of a man" mean?

I've just watched Barry Lyndon. At the beginning Barry asked Nora if she was obliged to dance with another man and she responded: "He dances prettily, to be sure, and is a pleasant rattle of a ...
Strider1996's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
57 views

Does "on" mean "ready"?

Cecilia cut it into small, soft pieces. She piled the chicken onto the sandwiches and then put the sandwiches on the plates. Andrew Jr. called out, "Lunch is on!"
ben_mb's user avatar
  • 91
1 vote
1 answer
54 views

Meaning of the phrase "strike a bonanza"

Just as a tribe might occasionally strike a bonanza in the game of primitive warfare, sometimes a state might do the same, given the opportunities offered an Alexander the Great or a Hernan Cortes. ...
Dmitry's user avatar
  • 11
1 vote
1 answer
138 views

What does "lose blunt" mean?

I am absolutely confused about meaning of "blunt" here. Could not find any card game by this name, no idioms, nothing :( Thank you for you kind help. Setting: London's gaming hell, 1833. ...
Kristina Lukosevice's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
396 views

Does "Come apart" mean "dissipate"?

The fog thinned and came apart Does "Come apart" mean "dissipate"?
ben_mb's user avatar
  • 91
0 votes
2 answers
79 views

Is it "a second nature" or "second nature"?

I wanted to say, Driving a car is like a second nature to me. But Google Docs and ChatGPT both corrected my sentence to: Driving a car is like second nature to me. So which is correct, and why do ...
Stefanie Gauss's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
109 views

Do the sentences "Yes, you did, very well so" and "Yes, you did so very well" have the same meaning? [closed]

Consider the following sentences: Yes, you did, very well so. Yes, you did so very well. Do those sentences have exactly the same meaning? If they don't have the same meaning, can someone explain to ...
Marios Athanasiou's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
42 views

past tense after 'in order that'

His group members tried several recipes and prepared all the ingredients in order that they made delicious sandwiches. Is this sentence idiomatic? I think 'in order that they "could make"' ...
gomadeng's user avatar
  • 4,258
0 votes
2 answers
46 views

Is there an idiom for "making someone reveal their secret"?

I wonder if there is an idiom for "making someone reveal their secret" by acting or speaking to them in a cunning way. Let's suppose X does not want to tell his colleagues the real reason ...
Rezes Molnár Hilda's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
247 views

"He was 'happily married' with two young children." Can somebody explain to me the meaning of "happily married" in that sentence? [closed]

Consider the following sentence: He was happily married with two young children. Can somebody explain to me the meaning of "happily married" in that sentence? Is "happily married"...
Sam's user avatar
  • 1,855
3 votes
2 answers
163 views

How does the phrase "to fall sway to [something]" work synctactically?

I was reading an article and came across that phrase referring to a writer who "fell sway to influences." I understood what it was saying (give way to, fall prey to, etc.), especially after ...
James Campbell's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
426 views

Wagering on the stock market bounce was always a long shot. Now it looks like a sucker’s bet

Wagering on the stock market bounce was always a long shot. Now it looks like a sucker’s bet. https://www.bnnbloomberg.ca/warnings-of-a-stock-market-bubble-finally-prove-too-much-for-s-p-500-1....
gomadeng's user avatar
  • 4,258
0 votes
2 answers
146 views

The grammatical function of ''just so''

I didn't do it just so my land could be invaded. How to understand the structure of this sentence? I check the dictionary, it says 'just so' can be used as a adverb idiom, meaning 'in a particular way'...
Date1's user avatar
  • 15
-1 votes
1 answer
23 views

Combinig past and present tenses together

I've made a discovery that a phrase to be out of the question is an idiom, meaning to be an event that cannot possibly happen. In a book (Charlotte Bronte - "Jane Eyre") I approached the ...
Stone Paul's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
62 views

Can you say "a project is on par with schedule"?

Is it idiomatic to say The project is on par with the schedule ? Or does "or par" mean "up to the standard", so you need to say The project is in line with the schedule ?
Stefanie Gauss's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
99 views

What does "we're out of clock" mean?

I found something in the movie The Channel. Bro, we're out of clock I know the meaning of that (we are late, the time is almost finished.) But I searched any kinds of dictionary I knew like Oxford ...
Sajjad Khorrami's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
108 views

Feel strongly (about something)

In his book, “Surely You’re Joking, Mr. Feynman!”, he recalls that he ‘felt very strongly’ after he returned to his normal life. He goes on to say that ‘fortunately’, atomic bombs had been useless for ...
stevenvh's user avatar
  • 209
0 votes
2 answers
215 views

Let someone/something go

Does the subject of the idiomatic phrase "let someone/something go" have to be understood as ultimately being in charge of freeing someone/something? If that's the case, does the idiom "...
Notarobot's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
127 views

British idioms in America

There is a question I asked a lot of people about that and everyone answered differently. Can I use British idioms in America or in front of an American citizen? Because some beautiful idioms are ...
Sajjad Khorrami's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
41 views

Could someone clarify the distinctions between 'beside,' 'besides,' 'aside from,' and 'apart from'?

I often find myself confused when choosing the right word in various contexts. Are these words interchangeable, or do they have specific situations where they should be used?
Licey Soremap's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
35 views

Term for predecided meaning of an unrelated expression

I just heard a friend telling me about a concept of gryps. Translating it to English produced very little (let alone anything of relevance). Originally, a gryps, is a message passed to, from or within ...
Konrad Viltersten's user avatar
1 vote
4 answers
998 views

Take a taxi or catch a taxi?

Catch a taxi Take a taxi Catch a bus Take a bus What is the difference between these phrases in meaning? Are they all correct?
Elaheh's user avatar
  • 11
0 votes
1 answer
33 views

What's the difference between these two "Get to" vs "Arrive at" in terms of meaning?

What would be your reaction or answer to these declarative statements? I arrived at the hotel. I got to the hotel.
Kaveh Behnia 's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
260 views

meaning of "I've been you" [closed]

What does (I've been you) mean? I was watching a movie in which a girl said : Do you still fancy me? The boy answered : Yes She said: You are lying. I've been you Source Closer (2004) - full ...
Maede's user avatar
  • 1
1 vote
1 answer
353 views

What's the difference between: "in a home”, "in the home” and "at home”?

I don't quite understand the difference among these constructions: at home, in a home, in the home. Especially, the difference between in a home and at home. I didn't find anywhere information (...
Ann's user avatar
  • 11

1
2 3 4 5
42