Questions tagged [idioms]

Use the idiom tag for questions which a dictionary cannot answer about set phrases with unusual meanings that can't be properly understood just from the separate words in them.

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1answer
148 views

How to clarify a mixed-up situation addressing someone

I was talking to someone in a texting environment but someone else thought I was addressing him and I had no idea what could I have said to him to make myself clear and avoid a mixed-up situation. I ...
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1answer
487 views

a one-stop shop for all things definition lists has to be — meaning?

A one-stop shop for all things definition lists has to be the excellent article “Definition lists—misused or misunderstood?” (www.maxdesign.com.au/presentation/definition/) on the hugelyuseful Max ...
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1answer
6k views

What is the meaning of “to work my socks off”? [closed]

Would you please explain the meaning of "to work my socks off"? example- I'm working my socks off, and you're just sitting there doing nothing! Thanks a million.
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1answer
31 views

“inside out” vs “ins and outs”

Are there any differences in the meaning of or when we use the idioms 'inside out' and 'ins and outs'? The definitions in Cambridge English Dictionary are: ins and outs : the details or facts ...
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1answer
47 views

About nick your beer

My Twitter listening parties are like gigs-but nobody nicks your beer. What's "nicks your beer" here? I can't take it straight. Source: https://amp.theguardian.com/music/2020/apr/10/tim-burgess-...
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1answer
57 views

Does the phrase “no sh*t” imply the same meaning as “no kidding”? [closed]

Used sarcastically, does "No sh*t, Sherlock." imply the same meaning as "no kidding"?
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1answer
72 views

Is there a restriction in the use of the idiom “I am done with”?

Is there a restriction in the use of the idiom "I am done with"? For example, when we say "I am done with the paper", can it mean you finished reading it, writing it, copying it or burning it, etc.? ...
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1answer
49 views

“Get through to sb” and “Get (a)hold of sb”

I have looked up many definitions in various dictionaries, but still I can't tell these two similar expressions apart. What is the difference betwen the two idioms "get through to sb" and "get (a)hold ...
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1answer
40 views

“Cheers to a new year” is idiom or literal?

On New year greetings card we get to see: Cheers to a new year. Is it idiomatic or literal? I am familiar with : Cheer --Noun and verb. I have heard about: Cheer for someone Online ...
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1answer
94 views

I don't hold anyone's ambitions against them senator?

Post-credits scene from Mafia III I don't hold anyone's ambitions against them, Senator! And you were certainly ambitious weren't you? What does Mr. Donovan mean by these sentences ? What ...
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1answer
39 views

Share interest, Unique ranking [closed]

What does "sharing interest" means? Ex) Managers often give the highest rankings to workers who share the manager's interest outside of work What does unique ranking means? Ex) Some companies ...
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1answer
232 views

Can I use the expression “go honey nuts”?

Someone has replied to my greeting with the expression "honey nuts". What does it mean? I was not able to find it!
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1answer
53 views

Prices Turn Higher [closed]

I have a question about the phrase "prices turn higher" here: Crude prices turned higher at the end of June as sanctions imposed on Iran over its nuclear program by the U.S. and EU took effect. ...
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1answer
29 views

Idiom- once (in) a blue moon

Opportunities like that come once a blue moon. Opportunities like that come once in blue moon. I did a little searching on the internet and found out the correct phrase/idiom is the second one, but ...
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2answers
32 views

What is the meaning of “lay it on” in this sentence?

I read a sentence in "The Tempest" which was: Lead, monster; we’ll follow. I would I could see this taborer. He lays it on. And it is translated to: Lead on, monster. We’ll follow. I wish I ...
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1answer
53 views

What does keeping one's arms covered up mean?

I was reading Eurotrash by Irvine Welsh. Richard in the novel says "You know what I mean. You keep your arms covered up." and I don't know what it means.
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2answers
2k views

How to use the idiom “long face” [closed]

Suppose someone has gone out to do something and when he comes back you see he is very unhappy because he has not succeeded in doing the job in his question. Could someone please let me know which one ...
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1answer
229 views

(As you mentioned / pointed out) and (Thank you for mentioning / pointing out)

I know that when you 'point something out' you have already found something important with that and would like the listener(s) know about it too in order to draw their attention to it. Now, please ...
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1answer
218 views

is it idiomatic to mix expressions “to nail something” and “the sh* out of”?

The expression to nail something usually means to "to achieve something or do something right". (informal) The expression "the sh*t out of" is used to "emphasize the degree of force of an action that ...
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1answer
3k views

Translation of some pashto idioms to corresponding or nearly equal meaning english idioms [closed]

These are some of idioms in the Pashto language. I've translated them literally and also tried to explain it, and i'll really appreciate if the corresponding English idiom is provided. The challenging ...
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1answer
35 views

“Deep down inside” Vs “In one's stomach”

I am going to imply that I have a feeling which doesn't let me believe something can be absolutely true (I have some doubts in my mind whether it is true or still I should not believe it completely.) ...
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1answer
550 views

“Overcome” Vs “Get over” Vs “Get the better of”

To me, all the three choices: Overcome Get over Get the better of mean so much the close things that can be often used interchangeably (at least in my two made up examples below.) I would ...
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1answer
141 views

A British equivalent of saying “tell it to the marines” [closed]

is there a British saying similar in meaning to American "tell it to the marines"? Thanks. source- Cambridge dictionary: http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/tell-that-it-to-the-marines
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2answers
226 views

Question about meaning of “type A personality” and “free meal”

I absolutely love to travel whether it be domestic or international! I have traveled all over the world for work and pleasure (Europe, UAE, Russia, Africa, Canada) but I still have quite a few places ...
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2answers
363 views

Make A Receipt From?

If I purchased something a merchant, then, according to members of this forum, I could write this: I made a purchase from the merchant. as standard English, with the preposition "from" denoting ...
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1answer
77 views

what's the meaning of “Am i on jerk'd?”“ in this context- 7th episode of ”Big Mouth" , an American adult animated sitcom

What the hell are you gonna jerk off to? - Nothing. I guess I'm not gonna jerk off. [BREATHLESS LAUGH.] Yeah, you're you're not gonna jerk off. All right, where are the cameras? [CHUCKLES.] Am I on ...
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1answer
667 views

What is the meaning of “can't helpful wondering about” clearly?

I have came across with the following marked sentence and couldn't understand clearly. Is it correct sentence? Could you interpret it? Its meaning is able to be "I can't hold myself"? Every time ...

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