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Questions tagged [imperative-sentences]

For questions about sentences use to give instructions, orders, or commands. For example "Sit down!" or "Do not leave your luggage unattended."

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Is it simple present tense or imperative mood?

Evernote is an easy-to-use, free app that helps you remember everything across all of the devices you use. Stay organized, save your ideas and improve productivity. Evernote lets you take notes, ...
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1answer
15 views

What is the function of “careful” in the “You be careful!” command

If I were to write, "You be careful!", you is the subject, but is the verb...what is careful? I know it's an imperative, but is it an adjective? Thanks!
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2answers
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“Join us!” vs “Join in us!”

I ran today into a weird piece of English. We were a few colleagues chit-chatting on the hallway at work. Another colleague passed by, and we invited him to chat with us. I expected the invitation ...
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1answer
48 views

What's the difference between “Try not to blink” and “Try to do not blink”

I recently heard: Try not to blink. However I knew the following form: Try to do not blink. Is one of them wrong? What is the difference ?
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3answers
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Equivalents to the present tense

Do this to avoid having to do the dishes. Do this to not do the dishes. I am not sure what tense the first sentence is, I feel it's in the simple present too, but I am not sure. Is there a ...
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1answer
22 views

Adverbs that modify verb in an imperative sentence

I know of only the following two adverbs that are used before the verb of an imperative sentence; Always Always have your dictionary near at hand. Always be true to yourself. Never Never mind! ...
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1answer
31 views

Imperative special cases — “Everybody look!”

One of the Imperative Special Cases here are the Imperatives With Subject, explained as follows; Normally when we use the imperative there is no subject because the subject is obvious—it's YOU! ...
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1answer
80 views

Nuance between said to him/told him

Imperative: She said to him "Buy milk" Infinitive: She told him to buy milk. Couldn't it have been, She said to him to buy milk Although said to him doesn't sound ungrammatical, it doesn't sound ...
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1answer
60 views

Where is the object in the sentence?

In the example of John baked Mary a cake for her birthday. and John cried a river of tears over Mary. Which is the object in the sentences? Are both the object 'Mary'? If so, why?
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1answer
59 views

Are didn't and haven't imperatives?

a) Do come in! Must come in!* Should come in!* b) Don't cry! Did'nt cry!* Haven't cry!* (the asterisks represents a wrong answer.) How am I able to explain that an imperative has an understood ...
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2answers
165 views

A strange usage of a bare infinitive

Look upon this sentence please: "But again, truth be told, if you're looking for the guilty, you only need to look into a mirror." Why "be"? The sentence isn't in the subjunctive mood, because there'...
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1answer
55 views

When to use the plain form of a verb without “to”

To know when to use a verb with or without "to" depends always on the verb that precedes it? I am aware that after modal verbs and in imperative sentences the verb is used without the "to", Are there ...
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1answer
227 views

Could it be imperative sentence without exclamation mark?

Based on the definition of Cambridge dictionary for the "imperative sentence": a sentence that gives a command or gives a request to do something. Then, as far as I can see, command or request ...
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3answers
1k views

Can an imperative sentence be without verbs?

In English there are 4 types of sentences as it's taught in schools: 1. Declarative. 2. Interrogative. 3.Exclamatory. 4. Imperative. Now, as far as I can see, all the first three types of sentences ...
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1answer
27 views

Any difference between “don't forget it” and “don’t you forget it!”?

Sometimes it gets confusing whether we should include "you" when we want to tell someone not to do something. For insantance, normally if we want someone not to do something, we would say "Do not do ...
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2answers
55 views

Why is “Tell me about…!” not rude, but “Give me the pen!” is; whereas both are imprerative clause?

It is quite often on TV channels that when TV presenters ask their guests to talk about somehing funny or important things they often use this structure: "Tell me about XXXX". We are taught at school ...
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1answer
296 views

Imperative form of second conditional?

I'm already familiar with the imperative form of first conditional, for example: tell me if you need something alert the guards if you see anything suspicious. but how about the use of second ...
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11answers
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Shouldn't it be “Nobody touch him!”

I heard in a movie Nobody touches him! Shouldn't it be in the imperative form, like "Nobody move!"? Background: from Brubaker After Redford's character aggravated the members of the prison board,...
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2answers
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Convert “want not*, waste not” to the passive voice

Please convert Waste not, want not to the passive voice. (This was asked in an exam, by the way.) Normally, converting a sentence to the passive voice requires a clear subject and object, which ...
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1answer
1k views

Is “Be noticed that…” considered correct in use of an imperative sentence?

If I want to request attention of a hearer, I know that I can create an imperative sentence such as: "Be aware that there are some exceptions." or "Be note that there are are some exceptions."...
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1answer
46 views

Can we use be in its basic form without any auxiliary verb?

Be can be used without auxiliary But for commands. For example Be cool Be stylish Be as you are But what about this sentence Peace be upon you?
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2answers
1k views

Difference between “let the party get started” and “let's get the party started”

What's the difference between 2 sentences? Or specifying the question: Can "let's get the party started" be interpreted the way -> Let the party get started for us -> like "experience" form of ...
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1answer
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Let's get the party started =? Let's start the party

What does the sentence of "let's get the party started" mean? Or in general what does the meaning of get sth past participle?
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2answers
906 views

The meaning of “Actually” at the beginning of a sentence followed by an imperative

What is the exact meaning of "actually" at the beginning of a sentence, followed by an imperative, like: Actually write down the rules. Edit: More context: The writer who has written this sentence ...
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1answer
5k views

Please vs Kindly [duplicate]

The word "please" is similar to "kindly". But somehow when I thought of using them, the approach is kind of different. When using "please" you'd like to ask for assistance. While using "kindly", ...
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2answers
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“Please come to me” or “Please come here” or “Please come to my desk.” [closed]

In my workplace many of my colleague are using the phrase "Please come to me" is that a correct a sentence?
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<verb> yourself <adjective> (eg: “eat yourself skinny”)

I ran into such phrases: eat yourself skinny sleep yourself to death run yourself thin As far as I understood from the context they mean: eat until you become skinny sleep until you die run until ...
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2answers
81 views

“Stop talking now!” or “You must stop talking now.”

Which one is more commonly used (in this context) ? Imperative form or must? I don't believe you, stop talking now! I don't believe you, you must stop talking now.
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2answers
293 views

What type of grammatical construction is “Look at the mess you're in”?

There is the sentence such as "Look at the mess you're in". What is it mean? And could you write me some more examples? So maybe I'll understand the grammatical constructions better.
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2answers
152 views

What is the verb form of “as you would have them do unto you”?

Do unto others as you would have them do unto you. How would linguists or grammarians characterize "would" in this saying, as far as English grammar rules go?
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2answers
141 views

Is this a dangling sentence?

Below is a paragraph I've come across on BBC. Is the first sentence dangling? The paragraph is introduced earlier in the article as part of a section in which business leaders "share their plans or ...
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2answers
589 views

Imperative with go (go do something )

I saw imperative sentences with the above-mentioned pattern with verbs "go", "come". The verbs are sometimes joined with "and". I understand it as informal usage with the first verb used as "...
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3answers
12k views

Correct passive voice version of “Do not disturb me”

This multiple-choice question appeared in an exam: Change the voice active /passive: Do not disturb me. Options: A. Let me not be disturbed. B. Let I not be disturbed. C. Let disturb me not. D. ...
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Several verbal complement for “warn”

Consider: The government warned Tehran's citizens to stay at home, close windows, don't walk in streets, don't sport in parks and finally try to travel to another city if they can. Must it be "not ...
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3answers
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Imperative in reported speech

I've been told that I should use simple past in reported speech when the direct speech is in simple present such as I **am** the best ~> He said he **was** the best but what happens for ...
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6answers
763 views

Requesting someone to ask a question of another person

Which one would be correct, please a) Just ask him if he has received the payment b) Just ask him has he received the payment c) Just ask him whether he has received the payment
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2answers
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Can we add subject 'you' in the imperative sentence?

Can we add subject 'you' in the imperative sentence? Without studying regularly, don't expect to get high marks. → Without studying regularly, you don't expect to get high marks.
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2answers
544 views

Why are imperative verbs used in computer science?

I came across such a question when I needed to design some diagrams, take the below diagram as an instance. As you clearly see, all verbs are imperative, I think it depends on the point of view ...
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Is 'Ladies center, men sashay, left allemande.' a complete and grammatical sentence?

Source: https://www.google.co.in/?gfe_rd=cr&ei=B2NRV_X_F8WL8Qe-xpvwDg#q=sashay+meaning Ladies center, men sashay, left allemande. Roll away with a half sashay, then face your original ...
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100 views

Use of be+infinitive in different meanings

I know that be + infinitive is used for order, instruction and plan but some of the example sentences are confusing to me they are: I'm to go now. ( what's the meaning of this sentence ?) Mr ...
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2answers
407 views

Language for a warning sign in a place like a library

Which sign would be more appropriate in a place like library: Please don't make noise. Do not make noise. Keep quiet. I mean when should we prefer to use " Do not do that" and when ...
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4answers
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Don't let's wait / Let's not wait / Let's don't wait

I was reading a book today and I got confused by the sentence 'Don't let's wait.' Don't let's wait? Is it correct to say this? I have seen sentences like: Let's wait. ... and I found lots of ...
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2answers
144 views

whether “you” after “Either” can be used or not

Either you tell me the truth or I will beat you. I'd like to know whether "you" after "Either" can be used or not. Can we omit the first "you", as in: Either tell me the truth or I will beat you.
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4answers
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It is said that we cannot use articles with “abstract nouns” but what about “Don't tell a lie”?

It is said that we cannot use articles with "abstract nouns". But here articles are used with them? I am just confused. How do you explain this in detail? Don't tell a lie. Speak the truth. I ...
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1answer
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Why is there no subject in 'Consider these markets when looking for…'?

Consider these markets when looking for places to sell your work. shouldn't it use a subject such as you?
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3answers
932 views

Is “I be quiet” correct?

I be quiet. Is it incorrect? One of my friends told me that "I be quiet" is an incorrect sentence. I don't know what to say. Please clear this confusion. Also, when I looked for this sentence, ...
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1answer
287 views

Is it correct to say “Don't YOU cry” instead of “Don't cry”?

Is it correct to say "Don't YOU cry" instead of "Don't cry". I mean that I know that usually people you the second form (don't cry) but my question if there are cases that the first form (Don't YOU ...
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1answer
561 views

affirmative imperative + “will you?”

Now and then I come across an "affirmative imperative + will you?" construction where, I suspect, the speaker seems to be telling someone NOT to do something or censuring him/her for doing so, as ...
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Let's do/ make competition or let do competition?

If I want to tell someone to make /do competition with me or with other guy, what is the right way to express it? Let's do/ make competition! Let do competition! Let make competition! Let'...
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How construct a suggestion?

I want to use a sentence-suggestion, but I am confused how to (or how not to) use pronouns. Example: (If you) Share on facebook, and (you will) get free a something! This will be used in an ...