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Questions tagged [imperative-sentences]

For questions about sentences use to give instructions, orders, or commands. For example "Sit down!" or "Do not leave your luggage unattended."

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In imperative situation; wear or put on jewelry

I'm wondering if I want to ask some one to put on her earings, should I say: Wear your earings. Or Put on your earings?
Afaq Nafar's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
52 views

Imperative, subjunctive or inversion (far be it from me)?

I ran into a phrase recently (the context, use the cc button for subtitles): Far be it from me to make moral judgements. The way it sounded was: It's far from me to make moral judgements. I'm in no ...
x-yuri's user avatar
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0 votes
3 answers
126 views

Is "Please be submitted" grammatical?

Is it grammatically correct to write Please be submitted the monthly financial report. Instead of writing the following? I would like to make a monthly financial report.
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
87 views

Subject omission in a compound sentence with both affirmative and negative sentences

These alerts are part of the testing process, do not indicate an actual emergency, and do not require any action at your end. Is it grammatical to omit the subject in a compound sentence with both ...
South Indian ɪŋɡlɪʃɪfaɪd's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
254 views

How to join more than two negative imperatives?

Don't run. Don't talk loud. When you unite the two sentences, which of the two below would be the more appropriate? Don't run and talk loud. Don't run or talk loud. I have another question. How do ...
kuwabara's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
350 views

"Don't you speak to me in that tone!" vs. "You don't speak to me in that tone!"

What's the difference in style, register and usage between Don't you speak to me in that tone! You don't speak to me in that tone!
Gulya's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
43 views

Is this expression idiomatic when you avoid eye contact with teacher because don't want him to ask to you answer a question: "Please, don't be me."

I have seen this on a advertisement. A teacher asks: "Who wants to do the problem 3?" And one of the students who is afraid that teacher would choose him to do the question try to hide his ...
Yunus's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
50 views

A sentence without a subject — is it an imperative? "…be as useless and boring as a gray rock"

It’s exactly what it sounds like—be as useless and boring as a gray rock. source I was confused when I read this sentence. In my opinion, there should be a subject before the word 'be'. But there is ...
Smith Tang's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
48 views

Aren't these the same: "KEEP OUT" vs "DON'T ENTER" or "KEEP QUIET" vs "DON'T MAKE NOISE"?

I have seen on a door of a room "KEEP OUT". Apparently, they do not want people to enter the room. But suddenly I reminded of other instances of "KEEP" being used as an positive ...
Yunus's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
85 views

"will you not open the door" meaning

Will you not open the door? That could be a request for the listener to open the door. But could it also be a request for the listener not to open the door?
azz's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
105 views

Carry the luggage for me, _________? A. Will you B. Won't you [duplicate]

According to the answer sheet, B is the answer. Does that make A incorrect? What difference do these 2 make in the meaning? Plus, is B more polite? It seems kind of frustrated to me.
Jax's user avatar
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0 answers
74 views

In the sentence "Wait to be seated" is it in passive voice or is seated and adjective?

I can figure out this sentence is an imperative sentence but is the word "seated" a verb or an adjective? and is it active or passive voice?
Dan's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
78 views

Continuous / Perfect (Continuous) Imperatives (with infinitive and subjunctive)

Sometimes it's necessary to use a specific aspect of tenses (simple, continuous, perfect, perfect continuous), but when we ask people to do something should (can) we use the same aspects in order to ...
IlyaTretyakov's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
179 views

Imperative: how to distinguish independent clauses and a compound predicate?

Consider the following imperative-sentence structure Do 𝑋 and do 𝑌. (Source: https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Commas/faq0067.html ) where I believe (but do not know this ...
user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
59 views

When do you use the imperative? [closed]

What are the right times to use imperative? If you are familiar with philosophy, there is the question about what makes an imperative true. I suspect an answer to that question would shed light here. ...
Benjamin Grange's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
294 views

imperative + will you?

What effect does the "will you?" tag at the end of a question have? To my ear, it sounds a little rude, adds emphasis. "Be quiet, will you?" As compared with the bare imperative ...
Benjamin Grange's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
357 views

The use of "please" in instructions

I'm translating instructions for my company's employees on how to enter data into a database. Most of the instructions are phrased as statements rather than imperatives (e.g. "In this field XX ...
Lillatanten's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
1k views

'Let not + noun/pronoun' vs 'Let + noun/pronoun + not'

I know that the sentence "Do not let him go" sounds okay. Now-a-days the phrase "Let not" is, however, old-fashioned ("Let me not to the marriage of true minds" sonnet ...
Sandip Kumar Mandal's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
81 views

Comma before independent clause of imperative sentence [closed]

It is considered good style to place a comma before or when it begins an independent clause. An independent clause is a clause which could stand alone as its own sentence, because it has its own ...
user90726's user avatar
  • 693
-1 votes
1 answer
71 views

Can the same thing be said as both an imperative sentence and an interrogative sentence?

"Guess what it is going to be next." "Guess what is it going to be next?" Do both the sentences express the same thing i.e. asking or instructing the listener to guess?
Curious's user avatar
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1 answer
57 views

Reduced adverb clause in the imperative sentences

1- (I - implied subject) Thank you for being a good listener unshortened situation: I thank you because you are a good listener 2- (You - implied subject) Promise her for being a good listener ...
gobels' eskiya's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
820 views

Is it wrong to say "be reminding me in your prayers?"

Is it wrong to say "be reminding me in your prayers?" Most often when we ask people to pray for us, they initially answer by saying they always pray for us. So I perceived such thoughts and ...
Isaac's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
2k views

The difference between 'Don't do something' and 'Not do something'

The difference between 'Don't do something' and 'Not do something' For example, as following scene: A: I want to buy toy? B: Don't buy toy! Could I just say not buy toy? There are any difference ...
yixuan's user avatar
  • 269
1 vote
1 answer
138 views

Can "You, too" be a negative short reply to a negative command, if you want to tell him not to do what he has just wanted you not to

Suppose there are two people. One of them tells the other to do something and the other wants the other person to do the same. So, A tells B "Eat an apple", B wants A to do the same thing. ...
Yunus's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
79 views

What is the subject of the sentence "Go home now"?

Go home now! home go you While 'you' isn't in the sentence, it was picked as the subject. Is 'you' the correct answer?
user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
63 views

Reported speech with two parts

When we turn direct reported speech into indirect reported speech, the rules are different depending on whether the speech is an imperative or a statement. Direct: He told her "Turn right at the ...
Englishfreak's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
196 views

Which sentence is it? Causative or imperative?

"Let not thine eyes be blind", my son. I think it is imperative because it is just an advice to her son to take care of himself.
Rafiullah's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
81 views

Can imperatives function as interjections?

I have no direct example, but sentences like 'Look! it doesn't work,' and 'listen! I have no time' make me wonder if imperatives can function as interjections, so a comma can be between an imperative ...
user126927's user avatar
20 votes
5 answers
6k views

Why isn’t the third person singular used in “The Lord bless you”?

I saw the following statement within the Longman Dictionary: The Lord bless you and keep you. But I think it should be like below: The Lord blesses you and keeps you. Because The Lord is a single ...
shapoor's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
76 views

"Except for" before an imperative sentence

Except for Louisa, who’s away in Berlin this weekend, we’ll all be at the party. The first example is from Cambridge Dictionary. Move all the furniture except the desk to the first floor. Except for ...
john c. j.'s user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
61 views

Omitting pronouns like "it" or "they"

In a style guide for writers by Apple there are a lot of sentences like alternate Don't use when you mean alternative. America, American Refers to both North and South America. Don't use when you ...
user90726's user avatar
  • 693
8 votes
10 answers
5k views

What does the word "just" mean in this context?

It was written on a T-shirt: "Do not disturb. Just don't." What does "just" mean here? Does it mean that all I want is that you don't disturb? There is a difference of opinion ...
mbmoosavi's user avatar
  • 121
1 vote
3 answers
600 views

Imperative form: Have or Make?

I was listening Somebody That I Used Know (Gotye ft. Kimbra), I realize there's a phrase that is in the base form. Have your friends collect your records and then change your number... ...had me ...
SaulJP's user avatar
  • 55
0 votes
1 answer
284 views

Is this an order or a suggestion?

So, I have been with a friend shopping. After we bought almost everything, I have seen some shoes and I wanted to suggest him nicely then he can get some this shoes. He answered me rudely that he is ...
Yaakov's user avatar
  • 111
0 votes
1 answer
124 views

"Use them" vs. "Place them"

A dialog between two persons, John and Mike, Mike is not a native a speaker: example 1 M: John, look at this sentence, should I place commas here and here? J: Yes, place them. example 2 J: Yes, use ...
user90726's user avatar
  • 693
0 votes
1 answer
49 views

Could we form commands with "we, he, she, it, they & you don't": "we/they do it", "he/she open the door", "You don't do it"?

According to Cambridge grammar We use imperative clauses when we want to tell someone to do something (most commonly for advice, suggestions, requests, commands, orders or instructions). ...
Tom's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
279 views

Question like imperative sentence

Is it possible to use the structure of a question but to make commands? Like these ones. Don't you talk back to me young Landy. Oh, Don't you worry. I'll be fine. I have another question. ...
Mhmd's user avatar
  • 25
0 votes
0 answers
56 views

Grammar -Negative Imperative ( Weep not, Strive not.... or Don't weep)?

I would like to know if those sentences are gramatical. I believe that is an old-fashioned way of saying "don't + base verb", but I'm not sure Strive not to be a success but rather to be of value ...
Jason O'Neil's user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
535 views

have vs. have yourself (imperative)

Why do you say Have a nice trip! but the Frank Sinatra song goes: Have yourself a merry little Christmas! What's the motivation for adding yourself? I know the motivation for adding for ...
Ben A.'s user avatar
  • 471
0 votes
2 answers
913 views

Imperative sentence and the following tag question

If the main sentence is an imperative sentence, such as, "Do it at once," Grammatically speaking, should the tag question that follows the imperative sentence be "will you?" or "won't you?" not "...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
819 views

Do imperative sentences have intransitive verbs?

Please guide me if the verbs in these sentences are transitive or intransitive: Please do me a favor. Close the door! Write this note. I enjoy walking in the park. I think these all ...
Learner's user avatar
  • 691
-4 votes
1 answer
1k views

Please post good answers- is it a request or an order?

Please post good answers Is the above sentence an order or a request? Since it is an imperative, it may be an order. Since the sentence begins with please, it seems to be a request. I think it is ...
Jvlnarasimharao's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
49 views

Difference between "going to" and "not going to"

I wonder what is the difference between going to and not going to in the following sentences: We're going to play football in my garden. you're not going to play football in my garden.
user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
856 views

"You can't do this!" vs. "You can't be doing this!" Any difference?

https://www.facebook.com/complex/videos/367883957181836/ If I were the security guard, could I just say, "You can't do this!"
Kevin's user avatar
  • 29
1 vote
1 answer
74 views

On the imperative mood

I've already learnt that if we want to make a sentence sound like imperative, there is no subject needed as in 1.Go see if she is okay! 2.Tell me if she is okay! But is it possible to include ...
GKK's user avatar
  • 2,546
0 votes
1 answer
62 views

Is it simple present tense or imperative mood?

Evernote is an easy-to-use, free app that helps you remember everything across all of the devices you use. Stay organized, save your ideas and improve productivity. Evernote lets you take notes, ...
Ally Fe's user avatar
  • 153
0 votes
2 answers
635 views

What is the function of "careful" in the "You be careful!" command

If I were to write, "You be careful!", you is the subject, but is the verb...what is careful? I know it's an imperative, but is it an adjective? Thanks!
Christa's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
3k views

"Join us!" vs "Join in us!"

I ran today into a weird piece of English. We were a few colleagues chit-chatting on the hallway at work. Another colleague passed by, and we invited him to chat with us. I expected the invitation ...
virolino's user avatar
  • 9,209
0 votes
1 answer
105 views

What's the difference between "Try not to blink" and "Try to do not blink"

I recently heard: Try not to blink. However I knew the following form: Try to do not blink. Is one of them wrong? What is the difference ?
Ced's user avatar
  • 1,073
1 vote
3 answers
104 views

Equivalents to the present tense

Do this to avoid having to do the dishes. Do this to not do the dishes. I am not sure what tense the first sentence is, I feel it's in the simple present too, but I am not sure. Is there a ...
Sayaman's user avatar
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