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Questions tagged [imperative-sentences]

For questions about sentences use to give instructions, orders, or commands. For example "Sit down!" or "Do not leave your luggage unattended."

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70 votes
11 answers
16k views

Shouldn't it be "Nobody touch him!"

I heard in a movie Nobody touches him! Shouldn't it be in the imperative form, like "Nobody move!"? Background: from Brubaker After Redford's character aggravated the members of the prison board,...
Eddie Kal's user avatar
  • 18.9k
20 votes
5 answers
6k views

Why isn’t the third person singular used in “The Lord bless you”?

I saw the following statement within the Longman Dictionary: The Lord bless you and keep you. But I think it should be like below: The Lord blesses you and keeps you. Because The Lord is a single ...
shapoor's user avatar
  • 719
12 votes
5 answers
23k views

'Make it happen' or 'make it happens'

We use the phrase make it happen. But why don't we use happens since it has the third-person pronoun it? Why not Make it happens
Vinayak's user avatar
  • 295
8 votes
10 answers
5k views

What does the word "just" mean in this context?

It was written on a T-shirt: "Do not disturb. Just don't." What does "just" mean here? Does it mean that all I want is that you don't disturb? There is a difference of opinion ...
mbmoosavi's user avatar
  • 121
8 votes
2 answers
1k views

Why are imperative verbs used in computer science?

I came across such a question when I needed to design some diagrams, take the below diagram as an instance. As you clearly see, all verbs are imperative, I think it depends on the point of view ...
Devin Hudson's user avatar
7 votes
3 answers
2k views

Is "I be quiet" correct?

I be quiet. Is it incorrect? One of my friends told me that "I be quiet" is an incorrect sentence. I don't know what to say. Please clear this confusion. Also, when I looked for this sentence, ...
I don't know who I am.'s user avatar
7 votes
4 answers
11k views

Don't let's wait / Let's not wait / Let's don't wait

I was reading a book today and I got confused by the sentence 'Don't let's wait.' Don't let's wait? Is it correct to say this? I have seen sentences like: Let's wait. ... and I found lots of ...
user avatar
6 votes
4 answers
5k views

It is said that we cannot use articles with "abstract nouns" but what about "Don't tell a lie"?

It is said that we cannot use articles with "abstract nouns". But here articles are used with them? I am just confused. How do you explain this in detail? Don't tell a lie. Speak the truth. I ...
I don't know who I am.'s user avatar
6 votes
2 answers
3k views

Imperative with go (go do something )

I saw imperative sentences with the above-mentioned pattern with verbs "go", "come". The verbs are sometimes joined with "and". I understand it as informal usage with the first verb used as "...
V.V.'s user avatar
  • 7,115
5 votes
3 answers
5k views

Why don't we add an "s" on to these verbs?

Why we don't add an "s" on to the verb in these examples? John, turn on the light. Stig, eat your breakfast. Maya, wait a minute, please. I learned in school if the verb comes before "...
user21002's user avatar
5 votes
4 answers
3k views

What is "No parking" short for?

I am studying in the imperative sentence and I wonder what "No parking" is short for.I also want to get more comprehensive material of the imperative sentence.
user48070's user avatar
  • 4,764
5 votes
1 answer
7k views

Go to play VS go play

Please check both sentences and let me know which one is correct. You can't just order your children to go play while you watch TV. vs. You can't just order your children to go to play while ...
user62015's user avatar
  • 4,007
4 votes
4 answers
32k views

Correct passive voice version of "Do not disturb me"

This multiple-choice question appeared in an exam: Change the voice active /passive: Do not disturb me. Options: A. Let me not be disturbed. B. Let I not be disturbed. C. Let disturb me not. D. ...
Heisenberg's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
243 views

How to join more than two negative imperatives?

Don't run. Don't talk loud. When you unite the two sentences, which of the two below would be the more appropriate? Don't run and talk loud. Don't run or talk loud. I have another question. How do ...
kuwabara's user avatar
  • 1,488
3 votes
2 answers
113 views

where is the subject?

I have this sentence : Today's lecture will spark a lot of discussion, and I just want to let you know that I welcome it, so please feel free to jump in. I have three questions: Where is the ...
Smolina Fezaphitsh's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
10k views

Difference between "let the party get started" and "let's get the party started"

What's the difference between 2 sentences? Or specifying the question: Can "let's get the party started" be interpreted the way -> Let the party get started for us -> like "experience" form of ...
qasxc001's user avatar
3 votes
6 answers
4k views

Requesting someone to ask a question of another person

Which one would be correct, please a) Just ask him if he has received the payment b) Just ask him has he received the payment c) Just ask him whether he has received the payment
Oscar's user avatar
  • 544
3 votes
1 answer
1k views

affirmative imperative + "will you?"

Now and then I come across an "affirmative imperative + will you?" construction where, I suspect, the speaker seems to be telling someone NOT to do something or censuring him/her for doing so, as ...
goldbrick's user avatar
  • 189
3 votes
1 answer
1k views

Imperative form of second conditional?

I'm already familiar with the imperative form of first conditional, for example: tell me if you need something alert the guards if you see anything suspicious. but how about the use of second ...
Faradin's user avatar
  • 49
3 votes
1 answer
9k views

Please vs Kindly [duplicate]

The word "please" is similar to "kindly". But somehow when I thought of using them, the approach is kind of different. When using "please" you'd like to ask for assistance. While using "kindly", ...
firecatcher's user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
2k views

Imperative in reported speech

I've been told that I should use simple past in reported speech when the direct speech is in simple present such as I **am** the best ~> He said he **was** the best but what happens for ...
Mohd Zulkanien Sarbini's user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
8k views

Can an imperative sentence be without verbs?

In English there are 4 types of sentences as it's taught in schools: 1. Declarative. 2. Interrogative. 3.Exclamatory. 4. Imperative. Now, as far as I can see, all the first three types of sentences ...
Virtuous Legend's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
320 views

A strange usage of a bare infinitive

Look upon this sentence please: "But again, truth be told, if you're looking for the guilty, you only need to look into a mirror." Why "be"? The sentence isn't in the subjunctive mood, because there'...
Abbasi's user avatar
  • 649
2 votes
1 answer
191 views

Johnny get angry

Here's a part of the lyrics of an old song of 1960s "Johnny get angry". https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wslyYxN8Nlg Oh, Johnny get angry, Johnny get mad Give me the biggest lecture I ever ...
Makoto Kato's user avatar
  • 2,006
2 votes
2 answers
368 views

<verb> yourself <adjective> (eg: "eat yourself skinny")

I ran into such phrases: eat yourself skinny sleep yourself to death run yourself thin As far as I understood from the context they mean: eat until you become skinny sleep until you die run until ...
DimanNe's user avatar
  • 540
2 votes
1 answer
45 views

Imperative, subjunctive or inversion (far be it from me)?

I ran into a phrase recently (the context, use the cc button for subtitles): Far be it from me to make moral judgements. The way it sounded was: It's far from me to make moral judgements. I'm in no ...
x-yuri's user avatar
  • 511
1 vote
2 answers
987 views

Convert "want not*, waste not" to the passive voice

Please convert Waste not, want not to the passive voice. (This was asked in an exam, by the way.) Normally, converting a sentence to the passive voice requires a clear subject and object, which ...
tushit maheshwari's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
973 views

Language for a warning sign in a place like a library

Which sign would be more appropriate in a place like library: Please don't make noise. Do not make noise. Keep quiet. I mean when should we prefer to use " Do not do that" and when ...
Mrt's user avatar
  • 11k
1 vote
2 answers
67k views

Please do call me vs. Please call me

Which one is correct? Which of the following statements is grammatically correct, and why? Please! Do call me. Please! Call me. And, If someone asks you: "Will you call me?" What should I say? Which ...
hellodear's user avatar
  • 1,158
1 vote
3 answers
104 views

Equivalents to the present tense

Do this to avoid having to do the dishes. Do this to not do the dishes. I am not sure what tense the first sentence is, I feel it's in the simple present too, but I am not sure. Is there a ...
Sayaman's user avatar
  • 13.6k
1 vote
1 answer
47 views

Why is there no subject in 'Consider these markets when looking for...'?

Consider these markets when looking for places to sell your work. shouldn't it use a subject such as you?
colona's user avatar
  • 1,205
1 vote
2 answers
61 views

Omitting pronouns like "it" or "they"

In a style guide for writers by Apple there are a lot of sentences like alternate Don't use when you mean alternative. America, American Refers to both North and South America. Don't use when you ...
user90726's user avatar
  • 693
1 vote
2 answers
3k views

"Join us!" vs "Join in us!"

I ran today into a weird piece of English. We were a few colleagues chit-chatting on the hallway at work. Another colleague passed by, and we invited him to chat with us. I expected the invitation ...
virolino's user avatar
  • 9,199
1 vote
1 answer
778 views

Could it be imperative sentence without exclamation mark?

Based on the definition of Cambridge dictionary for the "imperative sentence": a sentence that gives a command or gives a request to do something. Then, as far as I can see, command or request ...
Virtuous Legend's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
2k views

The meaning of "Actually" at the beginning of a sentence followed by an imperative

What is the exact meaning of "actually" at the beginning of a sentence, followed by an imperative, like: Actually write down the rules. Edit: More context: The writer who has written this sentence ...
Name's user avatar
  • 125
1 vote
2 answers
93 views

Sail to discover those magic islands

Sail to discover those magic islands Sail - here it means, travel by ship on or across (a sea). How grammatical the use of the word "sail" here? (even if we think little poetically)
arm's user avatar
  • 535
1 vote
1 answer
101 views

Carry the luggage for me, _________? A. Will you B. Won't you [duplicate]

According to the answer sheet, B is the answer. Does that make A incorrect? What difference do these 2 make in the meaning? Plus, is B more polite? It seems kind of frustrated to me.
Jax's user avatar
  • 87
1 vote
1 answer
137 views

Can "You, too" be a negative short reply to a negative command, if you want to tell him not to do what he has just wanted you not to

Suppose there are two people. One of them tells the other to do something and the other wants the other person to do the same. So, A tells B "Eat an apple", B wants A to do the same thing. ...
Yunus's user avatar
  • 7,411
1 vote
3 answers
575 views

Imperative form: Have or Make?

I was listening Somebody That I Used Know (Gotye ft. Kimbra), I realize there's a phrase that is in the base form. Have your friends collect your records and then change your number... ...had me ...
SaulJP's user avatar
  • 55
1 vote
1 answer
461 views

Nuance between said to him/told him

Imperative: She said to him "Buy milk" Infinitive: She told him to buy milk. Couldn't it have been, She said to him to buy milk Although said to him doesn't sound ungrammatical, it doesn't sound ...
user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
160 views

whether "you" after "Either" can be used or not

Either you tell me the truth or I will beat you. I'd like to know whether "you" after "Either" can be used or not. Can we omit the first "you", as in: Either tell me the truth or I will beat you.
thein lwin's user avatar
  • 1,805
1 vote
1 answer
1k views

Is it correct to say "Don't YOU cry" instead of "Don't cry"?

Is it correct to say "Don't YOU cry" instead of "Don't cry". I mean that I know that usually people you the second form (don't cry) but my question if there are cases that the first form (Don't YOU ...
Virtuous Legend's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
25 views

In imperative situation; wear or put on jewelry

I'm wondering if I want to ask some one to put on her earings, should I say: Wear your earings. Or Put on your earings?
Afaq Nafar's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
84 views

Subject omission in a compound sentence with both affirmative and negative sentences

These alerts are part of the testing process, do not indicate an actual emergency, and do not require any action at your end. Is it grammatical to omit the subject in a compound sentence with both ...
South Indian ɪŋɡlɪʃɪfaɪd's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
1k views

'Let not + noun/pronoun' vs 'Let + noun/pronoun + not'

I know that the sentence "Do not let him go" sounds okay. Now-a-days the phrase "Let not" is, however, old-fashioned ("Let me not to the marriage of true minds" sonnet ...
Sandip Kumar Mandal's user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
515 views

have vs. have yourself (imperative)

Why do you say Have a nice trip! but the Frank Sinatra song goes: Have yourself a merry little Christmas! What's the motivation for adding yourself? I know the motivation for adding for ...
Ben A.'s user avatar
  • 471
1 vote
1 answer
72 views

On the imperative mood

I've already learnt that if we want to make a sentence sound like imperative, there is no subject needed as in 1.Go see if she is okay! 2.Tell me if she is okay! But is it possible to include ...
GKK's user avatar
  • 2,536
1 vote
1 answer
2k views

Adverbs that modify verb in an imperative sentence

I know of only the following two adverbs that are used before the verb of an imperative sentence; Always Always have your dictionary near at hand. Always be true to yourself. Never Never mind! ...
Zeeshan Ali's user avatar
  • 1,798
1 vote
2 answers
1k views

Any difference between "don't forget it" and "don’t you forget it!"?

Sometimes it gets confusing whether we should include "you" when we want to tell someone not to do something. For insantance, normally if we want someone not to do something, we would say "Do not do ...
Yunus's user avatar
  • 7,411
1 vote
2 answers
144 views

Why is "Tell me about....!" not rude, but "Give me the pen!" is; whereas both are imprerative clause?

It is quite often on TV channels that when TV presenters ask their guests to talk about somehing funny or important things they often use this structure: "Tell me about XXXX". We are taught at school ...
Yunus's user avatar
  • 7,411