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Questions tagged [indian-english]

for questions related to the English language as spoken and written in India.

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40 votes
16 answers
19k views

How can I get rid of my Indian accent and sound more neutral/native

I have recently moved to Canada and I feel I often end up having to repeat myself because of my typical accent. I am attaching a link to a very short audio and would love to know what can I do to fix ...
systemdebt's user avatar
26 votes
10 answers
11k views

What does "meat" mean?

I asked my friend what he was cooking and he replied, "I am cooking meat." I asked "what meat?" He said, "dude, meat. Don't you know meat?" I asked him again in a more clear way, "Yes, but what meat? ...
user avatar
22 votes
9 answers
67k views

What makes an Indian English accent hard to understand?

I have experience communicating with people from different nationalities and several have noted that Indian English accent is difficult to understand. Are there any suggestions on how a person with an ...
meow's user avatar
  • 339
22 votes
9 answers
31k views

If “I woke up at 10” is okay, what about “I slept at 10”?

When did you wake up? I woke up at 10. But then if I say, “When did you sleep?” I slept at 10. – seems difficult to digest! That's because sleep is a process that includes duration. I ...
Maulik V's user avatar
  • 66.1k
21 votes
9 answers
222k views

What's a preferred alternative to the phrase 'do the needful'?

In India, this is used zillions of times every day especially while referring someone some task or to do favor. Mr. Singh, I'm sending my cousin who is interested in learning guitar. As you have ...
Maulik V's user avatar
  • 66.1k
18 votes
9 answers
68k views

"Do the needful" -- Why is it used instead of asking a question?

Update: (Originally this was a comment, but I thought it was worth sharing here at the top.) In the original question, I asked if there was a polite, socially-acceptable way to ask an Indian co-...
inanutshellus's user avatar
17 votes
3 answers
5k views

What is the term for 'a......a.....a...' in speech?

Most Indians have this habit while speaking in English. It's not stammering that I'm aware of. It's not stuttering or bumbling either. I'm not sure what is it called. The speech goes like this... ...
Maulik V's user avatar
  • 66.1k
14 votes
4 answers
18k views

'miss call' or 'missed call' when it is 'yet to be missed!'

For many it will be surprising but it is true in India! Often, a person calls on his friend's cell phone and cuts before he picks up. Most of the times it is a 'mutually understood act!' The reasons ...
Maulik V's user avatar
  • 66.1k
13 votes
10 answers
3k views

Fear to speak in English [closed]

My mother tongue is Hindi. I also like to speak, write, read and learn English. My English is weak, I fear to speak English with my friends, Social media, and with professionals. I've fear about ...
Mithlesh Upadhyay's user avatar
9 votes
3 answers
3k views

Omission of definite article in Indian English

Prompted by comments against a previous ELL question about an Indian English usage, I found myself reading an article in The Times of India with the title Kidnapped doctor couple returns home, which ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
7 votes
6 answers
3k views

Is the present continuous idiomatic in "I'm liking to take it easy on the weekend"?

Is I'm liking to take it easy on the weekend idiomatic? The context is that I started to take it easy on the weekend recently and I'm liking the novalty, the new state of affairs. I like to take it ...
Pumpkin cake's user avatar
  • 1,015
6 votes
5 answers
62k views

Difference between "kindly" and "please"

Manager to player Kindly practice every day Please practice every day Teacher to student Kindly wipe the blackboard Please wipe the blackboard Student to teacher Kindly give me a ...
Vinod's user avatar
  • 61
6 votes
2 answers
8k views

Timepass or Passtime - I'm confused between InE and IntE

Two definitions straight from the Oxfordcitionaries pastime (n) - An activity that someone does regularly for enjoyment rather than work; a hobby. timepass (n) - The action or fact of passing the ...
Maulik V's user avatar
  • 66.1k
6 votes
4 answers
9k views

A steel glass Vs. A glass glass!

In India, it is quite common to serve water in a glass made of steel. Here it is... But then, we also have a glass made of glass(!) to serve it better. Here it is... My colleague asked that if '...
Maulik V's user avatar
  • 66.1k
5 votes
4 answers
8k views

co-son-in-law or co-brother

Indians especially have a tendency to use the terms co-son-in-law and co-sister-in-law while referring to relations. The husband of one's wife's sister is called Co-son-in-law. The wife of one'...
Jvlnarasimharao's user avatar
5 votes
3 answers
17k views

Which one is more correct, "near impossible" or "nearly impossible"?

Usually, I write This task is nearly impossible, but I read the following line in a blog: Even though prices have been dipping, it's near impossible to manufacture a smartphone at such a low price....
Rucheer M's user avatar
  • 3,820
5 votes
3 answers
1k views

How do 'days' and other non-living things 'observe'?

Not only the OALD, but many dictionaries I checked broadly say only one thing about the verb 'observe'. to watch/study/notice (don't go literally, this is the broad meaning I could extract from ...
Maulik V's user avatar
  • 66.1k
4 votes
1 answer
10k views

Which introduction is preferred: "Myself [NAME]" or "I'm [NAME]"?

I want to know that in an interview, what is the correct way to introduce yourself? Some use Myself ....(name), and some use I'm ___. I'm confused about what is correct way? Please guide me.
Garg's user avatar
  • 169
4 votes
2 answers
1k views

I'm suspicious about ONLY ONE thing. Do I have a doubt or doubts then? [duplicate]

The question rooted from the comment of J.R. on this question here. He edited my answer making 'a doubt' 'doubts'. In the comment it's mentioned that if I'm suspicious about something, generally it's ...
Maulik V's user avatar
  • 66.1k
4 votes
2 answers
188k views

Is it Lac or Lakh?

I am much confused to use whether 'Lac' or 'Lakh', So which word is correct to use? (In terms of money)
Emmanuel Angelo.R's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
181 views

How do people who do not speak Indian English "prepone" things?

According to Merriam Webster, Prepone is an Indian English word which means "to move to an earlier time", used as an antonym to "postpone". For example: "The publication date has been preponed ...
Satya's user avatar
  • 800
4 votes
1 answer
13k views

'He don't have knowledge ' vs 'He doesn't have knowledge' [duplicate]

Which one of the statements below is correct? He don't have knowledge about others. He doesn't have knowledge about others.
user93048's user avatar
4 votes
3 answers
462k views

"For your reference" or "For your information"

I always get confused whenever I find myself in this situation. I get emails asking to send someone some pictures and other information. When replying, what should I write? Kindly find the ...
Ideal's user avatar
  • 161
3 votes
2 answers
6k views

American Accent or American Intonation?

I found this: intonation (n) - the rise and fall of the voice in speaking, especially as this affects the meaning of what is being said. And, accent (n) - a way of pronouncing the words of a ...
Maulik V's user avatar
  • 66.1k
3 votes
3 answers
5k views

If 'get ready' is not proper here, what should it be?

In Indian dialect, the commonest phrase you find among us is get ready when we have plan to go out. It does not matter whether we are going to party, movie, outside eating or whatever... if we are ...
Maulik V's user avatar
  • 66.1k
3 votes
2 answers
313 views

If I want to use an infinitive as an adverb in the sentence then I can use an infinitive with any verb as an adverb?

If I want to use an infinitive as an adverb in the sentence then can I use it with any verb or specific verb? suppose I want to say " I went there to drive the car" so here to drive the car ...
Sammed's user avatar
  • 1
3 votes
3 answers
4k views

"in more better way" vs "more in better way"

I am new to English. I have two sentences below. I want to know which has better grammar and is preferable for use. They can help in more better way. They can help more in better way.   ...
MAK's user avatar
  • 133
3 votes
3 answers
28k views

I failed exams OR I failed in exams? I failed math OR I failed in math?

While going through Swan's PEU, I encountered this sentence in its example: My parents expected too much of me when I was at school. They were terribly upset when I failed my exams. Now this ...
Maulik V's user avatar
  • 66.1k
3 votes
1 answer
1k views

"saw it work" vs. "saw it worked"

I read yahoo news on a daily basis and sometimes I find some mistakes in it. I post that part of the news here to make sure it is wrong (a typo mistake) or I do not understand it perfectly. News ...
user62015's user avatar
  • 4,007
3 votes
3 answers
4k views

The confusion about the word 'accommodation'

First, the word accommodation is a mass noun: accommodation (mass noun) - A room, group of rooms, or building in which someone may live or stay This is chiefly in BrE. I got it. Next to this on ...
Maulik V's user avatar
  • 66.1k
3 votes
1 answer
81 views

Is using "seeing" in this case wrong?

Question: The couple who saw her off were probably her parents. (Make it Simple) My answer: The couple seeing her off were probably her parents. My teacher said that my answer is wrong, and the ...
user295079's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
4k views

Can anybody tell me what does this sentence mean "Apparently, this user prefers to keep an air of mystery about them."

can anybody explain me what does the sentence mean "Apparently, this user prefers to keep an air of mystery about them."
CSiva's user avatar
  • 53
2 votes
3 answers
674 views

"Man, it's not that easy!" - What if I'm talking to a woman?

We use the word 'man' in such context quite commonly. [Added note: To avoid ambiguity] In all these cases, I'm talking to a man. He's right there, in front of me. "Man, it's not that easy!" "...
Maulik V's user avatar
  • 66.1k
2 votes
1 answer
586 views

What is the difference between "could be" and "could well be"?

What is the difference between could be and could well be in this sentence I found at the bottom right side of page 4 on https://d2cyt36b7wnvt9.cloudfront.net/exams/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/12173028/...
Abcdef's user avatar
  • 33
2 votes
2 answers
3k views

Is "He has gone for playing cricket" correct?

"He has gone to play." "He has gone for playing cricket." The first sentence is correct. Please explain if the 2nd one is right? If so, then why? If not, then why not?
Pareek Amit's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
7k views

When to Use Indeed

How should the word "indeed" be used? I know what it means, but I don't know when it should be used. For example: "You are such a good person indeed" Is this usage correct?
Sundar Rajan's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
724 views

You're at a restaurant waiting for a table. People leave a table, now can you say "a table just became free"?

You're at a restaurant waiting for a table. People leave a table, now can you say "a table just became free"? or "a table just became available"? or something else? What's the most common/natural way ...
user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
1k views

What means of transportation is used - "by trains"?

Is it safe to travel by trains in India? Travelling by train in india is safe. I know by train is correct. But it's confused to me whether it is correct or not using plural forms of the ...
canoe's user avatar
  • 2,516
2 votes
1 answer
1k views

India specific- Addressing multiple men and women in an interview

In an interview in India, how am I supposed to greet the people (all of them together) in the interview panel? The interview panel consists of at least two men and at least two women. Good morning, ...
Severus Snape's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
176 views

Dash against Vs crash into

The car dashed against a tree. The car crashed into a tree. I have heard both expressions while listening to the news. In certain grammar books the first sentence is considered to be wrong and ...
Jvlnarasimharao's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
3k views

A confusing word - 'formalities'

In InE, the word formality (yes, we use it in singular!) is too often used in different contexts. And in most of the cases (especially in a social matter), the word, contrary to its definition, means ...
Maulik V's user avatar
  • 66.1k
2 votes
1 answer
82 views

Where does the practice of saying "the same" instead of "it/that/etc." come from in Indian English?

One often uses "the same" instead of "it/that/etc." in Indian English. Example: Meanwhile, Microsoft's chief technology officer Kevin Scott was informed by OpenAI's chief ...
Franck Dernoncourt's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
480 views

How to ask people to speak slowly so they really speak slowly?

I'm learning English for many years, and I use English at work. Some clients I cannot understand. I ask them to speak slowly. They do, but then they speak quickly again. My bigger problem is talking ...
Felipe's user avatar
  • 21
2 votes
1 answer
12k views

Is it correct to say "kindly acknowledge my leave."?

Is it correct to say "kindly acknowledge my leave", if I want the recipient to know that I'll be on leave? Here's the whole email: Hi Recipient, I am not feeling well today. Therefore I will ...
Praveen's user avatar
  • 121
2 votes
1 answer
2k views

Meaning of "Don't look down upon your own kind"

What is the meaning of "Don't look down upon your own kind"? This sentence has been used when one person is upset or frustrated about something. Can anyone explain a little bit about this.
saravanan's user avatar
  • 141
1 vote
2 answers
3k views

Are "maternal uncle" or "cousin brother" commonly used in English?

Expressions like "maternal uncle" (meaning mother's brother) or "cousin brother" (meaning male cousin), used commonly in e.g. Indian English, define more subtly the relationship between people in ...
wondering's user avatar
  • 133
1 vote
4 answers
814 views

Does "throw up" have alternative meaning?

I always thought that "throw up" means to vomit. But I heard on a news channel ... The police officials cornered < robber's name >. He had no other option than to Throw up. .... I initially ...
Bhargav Rao's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
5k views

What's the plural of project in-charge?

Check this scenario - "There's a bug in software your company built." "Oh, I'm so sorry. You may meet the project in-charge (say he's Jack) for that." The question now: What if ...
Maulik V's user avatar
  • 66.1k
1 vote
3 answers
206 views

Do you say "Namaste, you", "Namaste, Grandpa", "Namaste, Daddy", "Namaste, Sirs", "Namaste, Boss" or "Namaste, + [proper name]"?

Namaste (exclamation) (Indian English) ​a polite greeting said when giving a namaskar (= with the hands placed together as in prayer and the head bent forwards) ​(also namaskar) [...
Tom's user avatar
  • 24.2k
1 vote
1 answer
204 views

Do we "learn byheart something" or "byheart something"?

Do we "learn byheart something" or "byheart something"? We learn by heart something and produce it Verbatim. Some Indian professors of English are using Byheart as a verb. Is byheart used as a ...
Jvlnarasimharao's user avatar