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Questions tagged [infinitive-vs-gerund]

For questions about the difference in meaning or grammaticality between using a gerund or an infinitive in a particular context.

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What does "to" mean in "The figure for Japan rose sharply to reach 2 million cars in 2010"?

I've seen this usage of "to" pretty often in data reports: "Then, the figure for Japan rose sharply to reach 2 million cars in 2010." I guess to here doesn't mean in order to. ...
An IELTS Learner's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
40 views

The rides are dangerous to the teenagers {to play/playing} there

The rides are dangerous to the teenagers to play there. The rides are dangerous to the teenagers playing there. Are both acceptable expressions? Is there any difference in meaning between the two ...
TUALL's user avatar
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2 answers
69 views

Base form or gerund: "Curricula should keep up with rapid changes in education, instil/instilling values… and enlighten individuals…"

I wrote this sentence. My teacher corrected it to me. I used instilling instead of "instill". Can anyone help why "instill" correct and "instilling" incorrect? Curricula ...
Rafeq's user avatar
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1 answer
70 views

Using a verb after a verb

I'm always confused in using a verb after a verb. For example: I prefer using the computer. I prefer to use the computer. I like to help people. I like helping people. ... etc. Actually the verb+ing ...
Emre's user avatar
  • 113
3 votes
2 answers
71 views

risking missing

As a secretary, I always risked forgetting to take notes while the discussion was most interesting, as I was concentrated on listening. As a secretary, I always risked missing taking notes while the ...
Francesco Potortì's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
163 views

"It's useless worrying about it." VS "It's useless to worry about it."

(1) It's useless worrying about it. (2) It's useless to worry about it. Question: A Japanese teacher of English explains that (1) implies that the interlocutor is actually worrying about it, but (2) ...
Kaguyahime's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
54 views

What should use "returned to find" instead of "returned finding" in this sentence?

I once found this sentence. Why is 'to find' used here instead of 'finding' He returned home to find his wife waiting for him. I'm curious about this. Because normally, when it comes to describing ...
ricky chow's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
25 views

five more to come OR five more coming

I have made up the examples below. (1) I said to my customer, "You ordered fifteen packages of toilet paper. I'm going to get them for you right now." (After one minute) I said to him, "...
ansonman's user avatar
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3 votes
3 answers
124 views

He didn't need asking twice - what's this grammar?

In one of the Paddington the Bear books, there's a scene where the characters plan to go shopping and explain Paddington what it is like to shop at a market. The following line is: Paddington didn't ...
Arseny Aleev's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
39 views

Passive voice: see somebody ___ (send) back into society

Which one should I fill in the blank [being sent/ to be sent/ sent]: Without access to books in prison, my world view would still be shaped by violence. It’s not who I want to see ( ) back into ...
Robin's user avatar
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1 answer
52 views

I paid him money to stay in his house

a. I paid him money to stay in his house. b. I paid him money for staying in his house. Which sentence should be used if I paid him but ended up not staying in his house? Which sentence should be used ...
azz's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
449 views

"A question needs raising/to be raised" Which is preferable?

I heard "a question needs raising" from a student of mine who is very fond of picking set phrases from manuals and it sounded weird to me. I would have used "A question needs to be ...
Carolus's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
17 views

The only action she performed was to withdraw/withdrawing the money - why both are ok?

We know that when the verb in the subject is a form of the verb "do", we have to use the infinitive form of a verb. For example, The only thing I can do is (to) give him money as ...
VinceL's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
218 views

Don't be afraid of being different. vs. Don't be afraid to be different

Don't be afraid of being different. Don't be afraid to be different. Is there any difference between the above two sentences? I usually see 'be afraid of ing' more than to-infinitive. ps: It's not ...
gomadeng's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
52 views

To Do v.s. To Doing

Sentence in question: (From Yahoo News) Beijing’s apparent openness to easing tensions with Washington may be no coincidence. ('to'- preposition? ) What is the difference between the above sentence ...
J.Joe's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
38 views

What better way to

Do the following all work? If so, is there any difference? What better way to please John than to give him a candy? What better way to please John than giving him a candy? What better way to please ...
Apollyon's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
56 views

"To become" or "to becoming"?

"It will take 7 years for you to become a good doctor" is correct but I would like to know if this would be also correct " It will take 7 years to becoming a good doctor" . I don't ...
Yves Lefol's user avatar
  • 7,635
0 votes
1 answer
79 views

"the problem is + v-ing" vs "the problem is + bare infinitives" vs "the problem is + to-infinitives"

A: What is the problem? B: The problem is making sure that everything works fine. B: The problem is to make sure that everything works fine. B: The problem is make sure that everything works fine. ...
alireza's user avatar
  • 1,070
0 votes
1 answer
254 views

"I'm committed to deliver results" vs. ". . . delivering results"

I'd like to describe myself in a cover letter as someone who's committed to deliver results, but: Should I use "deliver" or "delivering"? How do I choose between the two?
HeyJude's user avatar
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-1 votes
1 answer
38 views

going through such an experience

a. Going through such a traumatic experience is difficult to describe. b. To go through such a traumatic experience is difficult to describe. I think (a) is grammaticak and natural and (b) is not. ...
azz's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
151 views

Is there a difference in a degree of effort between "try to" and "try ing"? [duplicate]

according to a grammar site Try + -ing means that you are trying something as an experiment, especially as a possible solution to a problem, to see if it works or not. And Try + to + infinitive means ...
doraemon1's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
52 views

It is to be selfish or pro-social

“We found that time pressure tends to magnify the predisposition that people already have, whether it is to be selfish or pro-social,” Krajbich said. Source What's the reason why "being" ...
Aaaaaaassssss's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
52 views

necessary or extremely useful to manage / for managing

Are the following both okay? Is there any difference? A life skill is one that is necessary or extremely useful to manage well in daily life. A life skill is one that is necessary or extremely ...
Apollyon's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
19 views

try to make/making your meal plans exciting [duplicate]

I was told that "to try to V" means "to make an effort to V," while "to try Ving" means "to give the specified action a try." Suppose I am giving advice on ...
Apollyon's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
105 views

Why in this example do we need to use "working" in the gerund form after the verb "love"?

In the example below I believe do we need to use "working" in the gerund form? You will love working here I thought that verbs following "love" can be either in the gerund form ...
Jo R's user avatar
  • 119
0 votes
1 answer
80 views

Gerund or infinitive?

The only way to find the Secret Room is solving x. Is this sentence incorrect? Can we use the gerund here? I assume we can because if we reverse it, it'll be correct (Solving x is the only way to ...
Ninnananna's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
61 views

which of these phrases/sentences are valid English?

the context: I want to write a sentence/phrase in which I convey the idea that when one make a choice in life one have give up on something else. So the options are: 1 - each choice means forgo. 2 - ...
cynthia grillas's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
441 views

Swear followed by the infinitive and gerund

I swear to do it tomorrow! is standard. What about the prefect infinitive and gerunds? 1 I swear to have done it yesterday! - CORRECT? 2 I swear doing it yesterday! - CORRECT? 3 I swear having done it ...
user1425's user avatar
  • 4,458
2 votes
2 answers
72 views

Why is it 'doing something' rather than 'to do something' here?

In the page of 'memory lane' in theFreeDictionary, there's such a sentence as follows. It was lovely finding our old photo albums and taking a trip down memory lane. We should use 'to do', rather ...
Michael's user avatar
  • 3,488
2 votes
2 answers
542 views

Get to followed by a gerund or an infinitive?

I got to poking around and I found this oyster. He gets to feeling ashamed of the showing he is making. The new neighbours got to know each other. I'd really like to see you again and get to know you ...
Abid's user avatar
  • 429
0 votes
3 answers
156 views

Grammar with gerund or Infinitive

He tried ________ (work) in a newspaper firm but he still wasn't satisfied. These variants are wrong: working / to work / work / having worked What is the correct form of (work)?
Olga Klimchuk's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
317 views

"to be invited" vs "being invited"

I try to say It's a great honor to be invited/being invited by you. Which one is correct? If both are correct, what is the difference between them?
aoz's user avatar
  • 41
0 votes
1 answer
92 views

to meet or meeting: when talking about an activity

I enjoy to meet my friends and grab lunch together. I know that the phrase above is incorrect, that it should be: I enjoy meeting my friends and grab lunch together. But I don't understand why we ...
seven's user avatar
  • 37
1 vote
2 answers
3k views

"look forward to keep working" or "keeping working"?

It seems to me that the construction "look forward to" requires the accompanying verb to be in the gerund. But what should one do if there is more than one accompanying verb? Ludwig found ...
flen's user avatar
  • 589
0 votes
3 answers
50 views

What's the usual way <of/for> foreign travelers arriving at the airport <to visit/visiting> your hotel?

When inquiring about the transportation from the airport to a hotel, which is better? a. What's the usual way for foreign travelers arriving at the airport to visit your hotel? b. What's the usual ...
listeneva's user avatar
  • 720
2 votes
2 answers
152 views

To learn / for learning

Are both versions correct? Do they convey the same meaning? I think board games are the best games to learn / for learning different subjects such as history, literature and science.
Simo Ita's user avatar
  • 355
0 votes
2 answers
60 views

Writing or to write?

"Peter is very good at ( ) stories" . I chose 'to write' to fill ()but correct answer was 'writing'. Can anyone explain why 'to write' was wrong and 'writing' is correct?
H Yukiko's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
39 views

Expressions like "All I am doing lately is" should be fallowed by "listening to music" or "listen to music"?

I have read the following links and have a question similar to them: All we seem to do is argue or is arguing “All you have to do is read” vs. “All you have to do is to read” "What I have to do ...
alireza's user avatar
  • 1,070
1 vote
1 answer
226 views

"to resolve" or "to resolving"?

What is the difference between these two sentences: I have a good reason to resolving my question. I have a good reason to resolve my question.
user2925716's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
24 views

Working / To work at Google taught me how to work efficiently. - which one?

Scenerio: I used to work at Google. When I was an employee at Google, I learned how to work efficiently. Now I am not a Google employee. Example 1 Working at Google taught me how to work efficiently. ...
VinceL's user avatar
  • 2,313
0 votes
1 answer
67 views

The research he devoted himself to [blank] the farmers have a better harvest is very important

My question is which answer is correct to fill in the blank? The research he devoted himself to [ ] the farmers have a better harvest is very important. A.helping B.to help I think an easier way to ...
wonderfulwonder's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
126 views

Is 'What I prefer is to spending time with you' correct grammatically? [duplicate]

I have seen a promotional video for Beyond the Future in Mr Love: Queen's Choice, I copied its lines and want to rewrite them to practice my expression and grammar. Here is the one confused me of the ...
Beau Garçon Idol Lucianus's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
294 views

I don't know the difference between to infinitive and gerund in terms of nuance

I like to sing. I like singing. I don't know the difference in meaning. please tell me the difference. I am talking about nuance.
박용현's user avatar
  • 3,329
2 votes
3 answers
368 views

Why is "becoming" a gerund and not a to-infinitive in "pertinent to becoming a polished engineer"?

I cannot figure out why "become" is used as a gerund and not as a to-infinitive in this sentence: He wanted to bolster his problem-solving abilities, which, as he well knew, are pertinent ...
Roland Antonio Geldres's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
35 views

Which one is better sentence? "...a class for becoming/to become a tour guide"

I took a class for becoming a tour guide. I took a class to become a tour guide. Which one is more natural of saying?
yoshyosh's user avatar
-2 votes
1 answer
77 views

"He called me to repair the computer" or "for repairing the computer" [duplicate]

Could you please tell me which are grammatically correct Whether To+verb or for+ verb+ing? He called me to repair the computer or ... for repairing the computer" "I am here to repair the ...
Bilal Zafar's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
120 views

It was good meeting versus It was good to meet [duplicate]

If I have just met my friend's girlfriend, which of these would be more idiomatic? It was good meeting your girlfriend. It was good to meet your girlfriend. She seems nice.
Bobobobobo11's user avatar
  • 1,281
1 vote
1 answer
29 views

Is it possible to change gerund to infinitive in here?

Can I change the gerund in the following sentence: "Being an activist means using your voice" to the infinitive? That is, the sentence would look like: "To be an activist means using ...
Bari's user avatar
  • 69
11 votes
6 answers
5k views

Why does this sentence use "to writing" instead of "to write"?

This is a quote by Hemingway. Don't get discouraged because there’s a lot of mechanical work to writing. Should not the sentence be the following one? Don't get discouraged because there’s a lot of ...
Xing's user avatar
  • 121
1 vote
0 answers
49 views

Continue to provoke vs continue provoking [duplicate]

Do both forms of the verb "continue" have the same meaning in these sentences? Did I even use "to continue" correctly? He taunts the player from the opposing team. Since he did ...
Paul Levi's user avatar

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