Questions tagged [infinitives]

The infinitive is the base verb form, conveying no information about person, number, mood or tense.

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0
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1answer
23 views

“hear him tell” vs. “hear him tells”

Which one is correct : Now let’s hear Marco tell his story. Now let’s hear Marco tells his story. And why?
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1answer
98 views

“all they did was (to) leave”

I've come across this sentence: [...] I've spent my all life making people happy when all they did was leave. Shouldn't it be "To leave" or something?
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24 views

Some misunderstandings with the usage of the verb like as a gerund and infinitive

The book says this at the beginning of the chapter: The theory The exercises The solutions My questions I used to work in a supermarket. I didn't like it much. So they used to work there ...
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1answer
45 views

except drink / to drink / drinking - difference

She had nothing to eat except drink water She had nothing to eat except to drink water? She had nothing to eat except drinking water Are all the above sentences grammatical? IF So, What is the ...
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4answers
2k views

“On their way to killing”. Does it sound right?

Today I saw this tweet from Donald Trump: Russia, Syria, and Iran are killing, or on their way to killing, thousands of innocent civilians in Idlib Province. Don’t do it! Turkey is working hard to ...
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1answer
31 views

Difference between “not being tall” and “being not tall.”

___ should not become a serious disadvantage in life and work A. To be not tall B. Not being tall C. Being not tall The above is a test question, to which the answer is B. I kind of doubt it ...
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20 views

What is Defining And Non Defining Relative Clauses

I am reading an article on infinitive verbs and there is a sentence and there mention this: Give him an ornament to polish here they mention that the to polish is used as an to-infinite ...
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1answer
37 views

In Which Position To Place Adjective In Infinitive Form Of It

I Want to know when we use infinitive verb as an adjective what is the position of the to-infinity adjective as i noticed in this url examples it always use the last postilion https://www.grammar-...
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1answer
30 views

Can I omit ‘to’ after ‘and’?

For example I want to go and leave you. I want to go and to leave you. Which one would be accurate?
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1answer
33 views

Splitting the infinitive particle with the verb…is it lawful?

I was taught that the infinitive particle "to" cannot be separated from the verb under no circumstances, but my friend (a Canadian) told me that she would prefer "I try to never tell a lie" over "I ...
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1answer
20 views

“Speaking English or to speak English?”

What is the difference between these two sentences? I guess the first one is correct but what about the second one? In what circumstances can we use it? "Speaking English is not so easy." "To speak ...
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2answers
30 views

why not say 'to do'?

I have an advanced student who said that she feels that something I wrote needs a ‘to’ immediately before the word ‘do’. I told her that I don’t know a grammar based explanation, but that I’d find one....
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2answers
22 views

be benign, being benign or to be benign

Is there any dichotomy among the following three sentences? The mold on the plants proved to be benign. The mold on the plants proved being benign. The mold which is benign on the plants proved. If ...
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25 views

“Useful for you to understand or ”useful to understand"

a. This book is useful for you to understand the basic concepts of physics. b. This book is useful to understand the basic concepts of physics. Which of the above sentences are grammatically correct ...
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0answers
15 views

Do we follow “is” with a gerund or infinite?

Do we follow "is" with a gerund or infinite? For instance, should I say "Our goal is to eliminate distractions?" or "Our goal is eliminating distractions?" Thank you
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24 views

Helps plus infinitive or gerund

This equipment helps improving people's lives. This equipment helps to improve people's lives. Which one is correct?
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2answers
33 views

a great technique to keep in mind

a. This is a great technique to keep in mind when arguing with narcissistic people. Is that sentence slightly ambiguous? Is it a great technique per se which is to be used when you are arguing with ...
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0answers
32 views

Infinitive usage with tense

Does infinitive conveys meaning according to the tenses it will be the one of the causes for the transaction to fail. it was the one of the causes for the transaction to fail. Are those ...
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2answers
28 views

I didn't go to sleep though I wanted to

If I want to say I didn't go to sleep but I wanted to go can I say I didn't go to sleep but I wanted to (go) ? I heard we had to still write this "to" showing that "wanted" was followed by a verb, ...
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2answers
40 views

Why did he use “looking” word in this situation?

I was watching Sky news live and the journalist said: "And now, it's time for looking the weather". I would have said: "And now, it's time for look the weather". Using look in infinitive form. ...
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3answers
654 views

“To <verb> a <noun>”

To kill a Mockingbird. To catch a thief. To catch a cheater. Why is "to" used in this examples what does this phrases mean? I am unable to interpret any of these phrases.
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3answers
166 views

Is the Infinitive Mood an actual Mood?

Some English help websites don't even mention it when they explain Moods. Grammar-Monster.com, for example, has it down as "the infinitive form of a verb" on a completely different page and does not ...
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1answer
32 views

Using not to <verb> or to not <verb> [duplicate]

Which of these is the correct one, or are both correct? I moved slowly, to not wake my parents. - Intended meaning I moved slowly, not to wake
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1answer
39 views

whether + infinitive

I am not sure how the construction "whether + [infinitive verb]" is used. Examples: I don't know whether to turn left or right. (= I don't know if I turn left or right ?) I don't know whether to turn ...
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4answers
4k views

Why is “I let him to sleep” incorrect (or is it)?

I am trying to explain to someone why the sentence "I let him to sleep" is wrong, but I fail to come up with a good explanation other than "it's wrong". And now I am even doubting myself. Is this ...
2
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1answer
61 views

Putting to+infinitive at the beginning

My question is about the place of to+infinitive in some sentences. For example, 1- Before I went on holiday for a week, I was really eager to study at mathematics. I know this is correct. How ...
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2answers
185 views

Is “to infinitive” a myth?

Let us observe the following examples I want to speak to you I am looking forward to seeing you I am interested to learn English In the sentence 1 we say "to speak” is a to infinitive and to as a ...
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1answer
11 views

Difference between “going to” and “not going to”

I wonder what is the difference between going to and not going to in the following sentences: We're going to play football in my garden. you're not going to play football in my garden.
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1answer
37 views

All I did today was hang around the house and watch TV

I saw this sentence yesterday and wonder why it uses the bare infinitive (hang/watch) instead of the to-infinitive (to hang/to watch). All I did today was hang around the house and watch TV. Any ...
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1answer
32 views

Can the structure “somebody doing” replace a clause?

Consider the situation. A soldier returns home safe and sound from war. And his mother says It is such a blessing for him to come back safe! It is grammatically correct to change this to Him ...
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2answers
37 views

Right way to express a thought

I want to express that I would like to write a book before I turn 40. I want to know which among the below listed is best way to express this thought and which among them are grammatically incorrect....
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1answer
27 views

When we should add “to” before verb?

I am a beginner in English. I read this sentence in an example: "If you work at a job you enjoy, you will probably do your job better than if you work at a job only to earn money.". Why do we use "to ...
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2answers
30 views

using several to-infinitive subsequently

Can we say: "I want to learn to drive my car to go to my workplace to earn money"? Is it appropriate to use several infinitive with to subsequently?
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1answer
43 views

find/discover + object + to infinitive / past participle

Examples from Quirk: 1. They found him worn out by travel and exertion. 2. They discovered him worn out by travel and exertion. My remade sentences with "to be": 1a. They found him to be worn out ...
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1answer
83 views

“see someone doing something” or “see someone to do something”?

Tell me please what is the difference between the following sentences. I saw him doing his homework. I saw him to do his homework. Not so long ago, I would have thought that the second ...
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1answer
94 views

be better to do/ be better doing/

1- l'll get engaged like all the others. Get married. Maybe it's better doing things the way everyone does. (original) 2- l'll get engaged like all the others. Get married. Maybe it's better ...
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0answers
84 views

To complete or to be completed?

It took so long years to complete It took so long years to be completed Which is right? Both are okay?
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2answers
41 views

To: complement or telling the purpose

This research contributes to filling a considerable gap in academic literature dissertating on the application of CSR(corporate social responsibility) policies to address negative publicity. Does "to ...
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1answer
28 views

Negation after the to-infinitive

Do the following sentences mean the same? He seems to have not eaten for ages. He does not seem to have eaten for ages.
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2answers
38 views

Meaning of the sentence which begins with a verb in infinitive form

I cannot understand the following sentence because of its grammar. To borrow a phrase from the old Star Treck series, the "prime directive" of the limbic brain is to ensure our survival as a ...
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2answers
39 views

Can the subject of an infinitive be omitted in passive voice?

The technicians were fired to reduce costs. I have a doubt about whether this sentence is grammatically correct or not and whether I must add "for a noun" so as to make it clear what was to reduce ...
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2answers
41 views

to infinitive vs happen + to infinitive difference

Is there any difference between the following sentences, respectively? “It so happens that today is my birthday.” -- Today is my birthday. “I happen to have exactly what you need.” -- I have ...
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3answers
496 views

“I am safe” vs. “He is safe”

(A) I am safe. (B) He is safe. How do I distinguish the meanings above in sentences with the verb "to report"? For example: "I reported him to be safe." Who is safe?
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1answer
51 views

have had problem

Police claimed to have had sent the file. As have-had is used to connect past with present then how this sentence make any sense??
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1answer
29 views

“For + him/her/them + was + to+infinitive” vs “ was + for him/her/them to + infinitive”

The following sentence is from a book. [1] Her dying wish was for him to hike the Ap. trail. Why didn't the author write it as: Her dying wish for him was to hike the Ap. trail. Is there any ...
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2answers
78 views

Infinitive as adverbial modifier of purpose

I read this sentence in the Barron's practice exercises book (you should choose the incorrect usage): The understanding (a) electricity (b) depends (c) on a knowledge of atoms and the subatomic ...
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1answer
41 views

Used to vs would structural difference

I have a doubt on the following question. 1) I ______________ want to be a practising doctor but now I'm more interested in research. Options: A. was used to B. used to c. would I was ...
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21 views

Can {this/that/it} refer to “infinitive or gerund” when it is the object of “do”?

For example: I just thought it would be very hard for her to move the desk on her own, so I did {that/it} for her. ("that/it" is referring to "to move the desk") To me, moving the ...
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22 views

Why “being stripped” was used in this example ? Why not “to be stripped”? [duplicate]

The warning from the European commission could lead to that country being stripped of its European rights.
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Can we use “to be stripped” instead of “being stripped” in this sentence?

The warning from the European commission could lead to that country being stripped of its European rights. (As far as l know we must use infinitive after nouns )