Questions tagged [informal-language]

is for questions about whether a word or phrase is appropriate in an informal context or that are requesting a word or phrase for use in an informal context.

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Is it okay to omit the first "as" in "as adj. as" in informal speech?

I think I sometimes hear sentences like "Much as I think ..." or "Soon as he ...". I'm not certain, but when the "as adj. as" form comes at the beginning of the sentence, ...
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-1 votes
1 answer
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Is there an omission of the word "why" in this sentence and if yes, what is the reason for it?

The following context is from the movie "Serpico" "Person 1: We'll take it from here, kid. You don't have to hang around. Person 2:What are you talking about? That's my collar. Person 1:...
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2 answers
37 views

A polite form of "bitching about something"

I'm looking for a phrase that would get along the full meaning (complaining about something, swearing at it, talking just out of the need to vent) but wouldn't sound as inappropriate.
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35 votes
3 answers
7k views

What does the ‘thank you very much’ mean in “they were perfectly normal, thank you very much”?

I have started reading Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone. I was way too excited for my first English book reading. But after I started reading it, I got stuck and can’t go onward. The question ...
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0 votes
2 answers
23 views

Is using the term "What can I do you for" workplace appropriate?

I've been watching Cheers, and in season 5, episode 1, Frasier says "Sure, Sam, what can I do you for?" I was taken aback, as I hadn't heard that phrase before. I did some research regarding ...
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2 answers
29 views

meaning of "make an everlasting first impression"?

i have this sentence "The competitive world has forced everyone to make an everlasting first impression". what does everlasting first impression meaning?
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3 answers
32 views

That box will never get opened vs will never be opened

What is the difference and which is more correct? That box will never get opened vs will never be opened.
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9 votes
5 answers
2k views

Does saying "Keep it up" put me in an authoritative position?

As a way of congratulating someone on starting a new project, I recently said "Keep it up". The other person said that "keep it up" isn't a phrase one would use outside of work and ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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Does including 'to be' after linking verbs sounds informal?

Here I provide the excerpt I took from Advanced Grammar In Use: Before a noun we include to be when the noun tells us what the subject is, but often leave it out when we give our opinion of the ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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Is it okay to ommit personal pronouns in such situations?

I'm wondering if it's considered casual and natural to start sentences without the pronoun, or if a native English speaker would find that odd and feel that I'm either being way too casual or that I'm ...
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1 vote
1 answer
78 views

Formal you vs. informal you

Since there just one form for both cases and context is one way to get the idea which one is used, is there a way to understand it out of context?
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0 votes
1 answer
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Does it sound werid to native speakers if the learners use formal words in casual/everyday speech?

I'm always curious whether using formal words in a casual/everyday speech sounds weird to native speakers. Or maybe the native speakers can notice such uses but don't care at all? For example, the ...
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-1 votes
1 answer
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Can use this form in the informal conversation? [closed]

Chatting with my club colleagues: If I get my winch driver qualification this weekend I can do winch on Friday. Can I say: If I'm qualified this weekend, I can do Friday.
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Does Relative pronoun in relative clause always follows the noun it modifies/referes?

I have studied about relative clauses in many blogs and i noticed in every blog that, the relative pronoun was followed by the noun it modifies, is it thumb rule of relative clause? Or any situations ...
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-1 votes
2 answers
176 views

Is there an expression or idiom to express that your brain has temporarily stopped working because you've been overwhelmed by something?

I am looking for an informal idiom or expression to imply that my brain has stopped working temporarily because say I have dealt with a heavy math question or I have gone through an overwhelming ...
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12 votes
3 answers
2k views

Is it okay to say "We are no more in the 20th century"? Using "no more" with periods of time

The most correct form is "We are no longer in the 20th century". But saying "We are no more in the 20th century" or "We are in the 20th century no more" is also correct? ...
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1 vote
1 answer
31 views

Other words in the construction "that's a me (problem/thing)"

Recently I have come across the construction "that's a me problem", which I found kind of interesting. Doing some googling I have found some variations such as "that's a you problem&...
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0 votes
0 answers
16 views

How prejudice affects our lives? VS how does prejudice affect our lives? [duplicate]

I'm writting an essay and I have a question... Which one of these questions is correct? How prejudice affects our lives? How does prejudice affect our lives?
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0 votes
1 answer
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Why do some people use 'It's ain't' as in "It's ain't true" with "Is + ain't"?

I found that many people use the form of 'is ain't' on the Internet. I don't know why they use "Is" + "Ain't" whereas it doesn't make any sense? According to Google, there are ...
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0 votes
1 answer
33 views

Is this correct use of "I guess"?

The following is one definition of "I guess" on Urban Dictionary: -apathy towards something or someone Jack: So, are you pro-life or pro-choice? Because I really feel that when you analyze ...
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0 votes
3 answers
68 views

What is the opposite of "a soft spot"?

If one can have a soft spot for cherished things, one can have a ________ for dreaded ones. I've thought about words like "imperviousness" or "immunity", but they sound more formal ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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'X' no longer or no longer 'X'

What is the difference between following sentences: "This outpost is no longer used". "No longer this outpost is used". Do both of the given sentences grammatically carry the same ...
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-2 votes
1 answer
294 views

What does "Book skin" mean in this context? (I've got extra book skin from breastfeeding) [closed]

"I've got extra book skin from breastfeeding" What does "book skin" exactly mean here?
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0 votes
0 answers
25 views

What are some adjectives that are usually used without a subject or verb in response to something, similar to "agreed"?

Consider the following example: A: How about I do the dishes and you make dinner? B: Agreed. Could you give me other examples for adjectives that are usually used in this way?
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0 votes
1 answer
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Can I omit the article in this case?

Certain nouns, such as "baby", "Mom" or "Dad", can be used without the article "The", and I think that by doing so you give a sense of intimacy and informality. ...
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2 votes
1 answer
162 views

Usage of the suffix o-meter in compound words like: busy-o-meter, happy-o-meter

Someone on another website was wondering whether a certain word was correct. After they asked the question they said: I guess I'm asking how it rates on the correct-o-meter. The usage of correct-o-...
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  • 1,395
0 votes
0 answers
59 views

Sarcasm through words like "yay" and "thanks"

The other day I came across an interesting usage of yay. Context: a YouTuber was reviewing a book in which the author painted a too optimistic picture of how the future might look like, she ...
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1 vote
1 answer
72 views

"Well done to even think of it", is this correct?

I came across this sentence: Well done to even think of it. which struck me as odd grammar-wise. I did some research and well done to seemed to be always followed by a name or a pronoun but never a ...
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1 vote
1 answer
639 views

Usage of 'almighty' in informal language

I had always thought that almighty was only used in religious contexts until I came across: An almighty sigh of relief which I found interesting. I am wondering, is using almighty considered ...
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0 votes
0 answers
33 views

"Is that the words?!" or "are those the words?!" when forgetting the lyrics of a song

I was watching a video and I heard the following sentence: We're gonna take you on a journey here today, literally I'm about to call this guy, the scammer, up, and we'll be watching him, [music ...
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-2 votes
1 answer
56 views

Informal or formal? "mind your p's and q's" [closed]

"mind your p's and q's" Is this phrase formal or informal?
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1 vote
0 answers
29 views

Can I say "Hoping for good"? And some other songwriting problems

I'm writing a song with the following draft lyrics: My little soul, don't be so blue This little song is made to be happy, My tall body, don't be so shy: There are just two of us here: you and I. ...
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3 votes
1 answer
305 views

Why sometimes in the U.S.A do they skip verbs?

Reading some lyrics from American songs, I've noticed that sometimes they skip verbs. For example in F.N. by Lil Tjay he says "You a Man, I don't fear you" Isn't this wrong? I think it ...
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1 vote
2 answers
61 views

synonym for "introspection" or "thinking inwardly"

I want to use a word that not only conveys the meaning of "thinking inwardly" but also is common, informal and normal in native English. I use the examples below and some synonyms for ...
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0 votes
2 answers
358 views

"What do you mean?" vs "what you mean?"

I looked it up online and came across the same question asked on different forums online, and all the answers say the only correct way is "what do you mean?", as a stand alone question. But ...
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1 vote
2 answers
2k views

He and I / Him and me / He and me / Him and I [duplicate]

A: Where would you have the perfect date? B: In a place without people. Just him and me. Is this written correctly?
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0 votes
0 answers
31 views

Informal word or rude

Is there some rude or informal word if you want to sell broken thing to buyer without letting him know that it's broken?
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26 votes
2 answers
10k views

What does "ima" mean in "ima sue the s*** out of em"?

Is "ima" an informal spelling of "I must"? MegaCharizardZord Replying to @nytimes about COVID-19 vaccine: i just hope when i take it don't die lol. i trust the government in ...
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0 votes
2 answers
43 views

What does the following sentence mean ? "Since when is ..."

I saw the following sentence and I cannot understand its exact meaning. Since when is W equal to PV ? I do not understand the combination of "since + when". Is it also formal or informal? ...
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0 votes
0 answers
49 views

"Would you like to go on a holiday together?" -- is this correct English?

One person asks another person: Would you like to go on a holiday together? or Would you like to go out together? I take it that "with me" or "with us" is implied. Is that use ...
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4 votes
2 answers
147 views

Having terrible spoken English in daily contexts

Short background of me: I was originally from the Philippines and have learned English for 14 years in school. I came from a family with humble beginnings and grew up surrounded by people who speak ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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Why were some English phrases written in double negatives when the speaker actually wants to express a single negative? [duplicate]

For example, I just saw this phrase on social media: The way 2020 going, I ain't buyin' no PS5. I mean, in this instance, I can ultimately see that what the poster actually mean is that "I ain'...
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1 vote
2 answers
66 views

Omitting "and", "or" in enumerations

In TV series and films I sometimes come across enumerations that lack the "and" or the "or", and sometimes even have something very different used instead. What do you want coffee ...
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0 votes
3 answers
89 views

Using the adverb (so) with a noun

From time to time I hear this construction used informally by some native speakers, I think it conveys the intended meaning in a unique way, as in: It's so summer! I would love to know if there are ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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I was toxic MYSELF

I've tried looking up 'myself' but the only results I get is 'myself or by myself.' But my problem is a bit different. I was talking about a few toxic friends who I used to play video games with and I ...
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0 votes
1 answer
303 views

Is it normal to find mistakes in the novel “Lord of Flies”?

I started reading “Lord of Flies” from William Golding, and so far I really like it. However, I came across many grammar or verb mistakes like the ones below: “Your dad don’t know, nobody don’t know......
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0 votes
1 answer
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I can't stress enough how this position/job is appropriate for me

I wrote the following sentence but am not sure enough if it is appropriate to use it in a job interview and if the word "appropriate" is good choice for the sentence to show your willingness ...
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0 votes
1 answer
39 views

Rewriting short sentences to full sentences

Michael Swan in his book Practical English Usage (page 1) writes: Some styles of writing and speech have their own grammatical rules, often because of the need to save space and time. Informal notes, ...
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0 votes
0 answers
32 views

Why do native speakers sometimes call some one 'name + boy'?

I've heard male native speakers call their male friends by their name + boy. For example, a man's name is David, and a male friend of his once said to him 'Hey David boy...' And I've heard another ...
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0 votes
0 answers
217 views

Is the phrase "with flying colours" informal

As suggested in the title, I wonder if i can use it in my thesis? I'm discussing the education of spoken English in China, I just thought about the phrase just now, probably I'll be using it like ...
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