Questions tagged [informal-language]

is for questions about whether a word or phrase is appropriate in an informal context or that are requesting a word or phrase for use in an informal context.

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That movement right there, gets your back

I was watching standup of the comedian Bryan Callen on YouTube and his set was about how he always wanted to be a hero. He described what heroes are like and one of the aspects of them was the fact ...
Static Bounce's user avatar
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1 answer
59 views

Meaning and Usage of "Got You" in Conversations with Younger Individuals

I recently encountered the phrase "got you" while interacting with a younger individual, and I'm trying to understand its meaning and appropriate usage in this context. From what I gathered, ...
Iman Mohammadi's user avatar
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1 answer
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Meaning of . . . painted white, with tropical economy

(From The Wrecker by Robert Louis Stevenson and Lloyd Osbourne, Chapter XIII, Published 1892) Passage 208 I could not hold still whether in hand or foot; the slowness of the men, tired as dogs after ...
philphil's user avatar
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. . . we'll make that island to-morrow afternoon, and have the lee of it to lie under, if we can't make out to run in

(From The Wrecker by Robert Louis Stevenson and Lloyd Osbourne, Chapter XII, published 1892) From these signs, I gathered that all was not exactly for the best; and I would have given a good handful ...
philphil's user avatar
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I made one shoot of it off the house

(From 'The Wrecker' by Robert Louis Stevenson and Lloyd Osbourne, Chapter XII, published 1892) . . . And with that he smiled like a man recalling something. “Look here, that brings a yarn in my head,”...
philphil's user avatar
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1 answer
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Meaning of "I don't deny but what some of them are soft"

(From The Wrecker by Robert Louis Stevenson and Lloyd Osbourne, Chapter XII, published 1892) You don't know; you haven't a guess. How would you like to go on deck for your middle watch, fourteen ...
philphil's user avatar
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1 answer
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omitting 'a' in any phrase or sentence?

“It’s not a big part, but it’s a nice little part,” he said. “I got involved in the Mayberry thing over 20 years ago. I met the Howell brothers about three years ago at Mayberry Days in Mt. Airy, N.C.,...
Sayaman's user avatar
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4 votes
3 answers
1k views

"Who you don't know their name" vs "Whose name you don't know"

From urbandictionary.com: (1) G - word used to call someone who you don't know their name my variant: (2) G - word used to call someone whose name you don't know As far as I understand, entry (1) is ...
Loviii's user avatar
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1 answer
43 views

must vs have to vs have got to: How about "Gotta catch'em all?

I learnt that you use "must" when the speaker is the one who decided the choice. On the other hand, "have to" is used in case the choice was made by someone else. I also learnt ...
kuwabara's user avatar
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1 answer
74 views

If I use "all the same" will the sentence be grammatically correct

None of his requests were granted, he kept on asking all the same. If I use "all the same" in this sentence will it be grammatically correct? Thank you.
ihateithere's user avatar
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1 answer
241 views

How to express "stupid/fool/dumb brother" in a friendly way? [closed]

I vaguely remember in the past I heard a father said with a smile, "My stupid boy/son, it is a cat, not a dog." In this context, the father was not scolding his son. It's spoken in a ...
Gqqnbig's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
321 views

Is the suffix "-wise" in the sense 'relating to' really informal?

According to Cambridge Dictionary, the suffix "-wise" used in the sense 'relating to' is informal in BrE. The examples they list are as follows: What shall we do food-wise - do you fancy ...
Mooshi's user avatar
  • 109
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1 answer
71 views

them can be used in a informal way?

Them are two good ones, he said. James Joyce writes this sentence. is that used in an informal way?
William8964's user avatar
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2 answers
428 views

The meaning of “grab a bite”

I have the following sentence in my textbook: Let’s grab a bite before we get down to work. (English Collocations in Use, Advanced, Exercise 1.4) At first, I thought that the meaning of “grab a bite”...
Azat Khabibulin's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
174 views

Is "I got thinking" correct?

Is it correct to say "I got thinking about all my mistakes" instead of "I started thinking about all my mistakes"? I've heard "It got me thinking about...", which ...
Jo R's user avatar
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1 answer
70 views

Is there and what is the official name for omitting words from phrases?

When somebody says "Be all right" with the implied meaning of "It will be all right" or, similarly, saying "Hope for us yet" with the implied meaning of "There is ...
Michael Munta's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
73 views

have got / have gotten

I barely say "got" or "gotten" and thus I'm trying to add it to my vocabulary. I live in the United States and fully understand they are best used in informal context. I see a load ...
Gqqnbig's user avatar
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1 answer
35 views

Is this paragraph informal conversation or in writing and formal format?

I just started learning English and I listen to podcasts like this. My question is that the following paragraph is an informal conversation or in writing and formal format: In 1436 in Germany, ...
Mehdi Rahimi's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
179 views

Is the adjective "crucial" really informal?

I was looking for synonyms for "necessary" in Collins dictionary, and to my surprise, I saw that they mark the adjective "crucial" as informal. Is this really accurate? It's not ...
Gerda's user avatar
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1 answer
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The word "InnerTube" in a different context

I´m translating a subtitle of a movie but I have not understood this sentence: " The things these kids post out on them InnerTube, ohhh boy I do not get that" What is the meaning of "...
Rogerio Sarmento's user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
146 views

Is 'legitimately' informal when it means really?

In many videos, the streamers there use the word 'legitly' or 'legitimately' to mean very or really. For examples, the Anime Man says, I legitimately thought, the first time i saw this article, I ...
Michael's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
35 views

Can we use "Jill has got hers" here?

Hey have you got an eraser? No I don't. But Jill has got hers. Ask her. I know that we can use one instead of hers, but can we use hers as well?
ihateithere's user avatar
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1 answer
33 views

meaning of "gets a shot" and "get it on target" [closed]

I don't understand what "get" means in this sentence because it has a lot of meanings. Could you explain? 68' Chance for Leeds! Gelhardt gets a shot away from the edge of the box but he can'...
Jembot's user avatar
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12 votes
6 answers
4k views

Can I replace 'have not' or 'haven't' with 'ain't' in oral English?

In an English lesson, the teacher said, I ain't been to Jamaica. Obviously, she replaced 'haven't' by 'ain't'. If 'haven't' or 'have not' is used to form a perfect tense, can I always replace it ...
Michael's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
54 views

Meaning of "because he took himself right out of the line-up. He quit cold."

Part of a movie script of King Creole. Can’t understand words in bold and a whole scene: My mother was killed in an accident three years ago. It might as well have gotten the old man, too, because he ...
Ola's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
87 views

'Mom to 2 Yorkies' is that sentence grammatically correct?

I have seen people writing on social media like 'Mom to 2 Yorkies' (mostly for pet animals). Is that usage grammatically correct? My question is about 'to'. What is the difference between Mom of 2 ...
shanila sukumaran's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
410 views

What are more formal words/phrases for "pass sth on to sb" and "get back to someone"?

In the following sentence, I feel that the phrases "pass on to" and "get back to" are rather informal. Am I right about this, and, if so, what are more formal expressions I could ...
Helen's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
47 views

Is "real talk, me?" grammatical?

Is "real talk, me?" grammatical? To me, it is grammatical and completely valid, and by "real talk, me?" I mean "You're expecting real talk from me (I am a clown)?". Is ...
Sayaman's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
32 views

How to explain the different tenses here?

I'm doing TOEFL speaking practice, and today I met something I can't explain in TPO15: the girl is in the choir where everyone is asked to wear a white shirt and black pants. But she just spilled ...
babeimi's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
147 views

Is it okay to omit the first "as" in "as adj. as" in informal speech?

I think I sometimes hear sentences like "Much as I think ..." or "Soon as he ...". I'm not certain, but when the "as adj. as" form comes at the beginning of the sentence, ...
xiver77's user avatar
  • 133
-1 votes
1 answer
44 views

Is there an omission of the word "why" in this sentence and if yes, what is the reason for it?

The following context is from the movie "Serpico" "Person 1: We'll take it from here, kid. You don't have to hang around. Person 2:What are you talking about? That's my collar. Person 1:...
Static Bounce's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
106 views

A polite form of "bitching about something"

I'm looking for a phrase that would get along the full meaning (complaining about something, swearing at it, talking just out of the need to vent) but wouldn't sound as inappropriate.
Probably's user avatar
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35 votes
3 answers
8k views

What does the ‘thank you very much’ mean in “they were perfectly normal, thank you very much”?

I have started reading Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone. I was way too excited for my first English book reading. But after I started reading it, I got stuck and can’t go onward. The question ...
Ebdullah Khan's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
61 views

Is using the term "What can I do you for" workplace appropriate?

I've been watching Cheers, and in season 5, episode 1, Frasier says "Sure, Sam, what can I do you for?" I was taken aback, as I hadn't heard that phrase before. I did some research regarding ...
AndreasKralj's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
152 views

meaning of "make an everlasting first impression"?

i have this sentence "The competitive world has forced everyone to make an everlasting first impression". what does everlasting first impression meaning?
arcane_data's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
46 views

That box will never get opened vs will never be opened

What is the difference and which is more correct? That box will never get opened vs will never be opened.
Eleanor Phyle's user avatar
9 votes
5 answers
2k views

Does saying "Keep it up" put me in an authoritative position?

As a way of congratulating someone on starting a new project, I recently said "Keep it up". The other person said that "keep it up" isn't a phrase one would use outside of work and ...
nocomment's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
38 views

Does including 'to be' after linking verbs sounds informal?

Here I provide the excerpt I took from Advanced Grammar In Use: Before a noun we include to be when the noun tells us what the subject is, but often leave it out when we give our opinion of the ...
user516076's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
152 views

Is it okay to ommit personal pronouns in such situations?

I'm wondering if it's considered casual and natural to start sentences without the pronoun, or if a native English speaker would find that odd and feel that I'm either being way too casual or that I'm ...
Vendrameto's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
490 views

Formal you vs. informal you

Since there just one form for both cases and context is one way to get the idea which one is used, is there a way to understand it out of context?
Andrei's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
75 views

Does it sound werid to native speakers if the learners use formal words in casual/everyday speech?

I'm always curious whether using formal words in a casual/everyday speech sounds weird to native speakers. Or maybe the native speakers can notice such uses but don't care at all? For example, the ...
yaobin's user avatar
  • 313
-1 votes
1 answer
37 views

Can use this form in the informal conversation? [closed]

Chatting with my club colleagues: If I get my winch driver qualification this weekend I can do winch on Friday. Can I say: If I'm qualified this weekend, I can do Friday.
0___________'s user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
100 views

Does Relative pronoun in relative clause always follows the noun it modifies/referes?

I have studied about relative clauses in many blogs and i noticed in every blog that, the relative pronoun was followed by the noun it modifies, is it thumb rule of relative clause? Or any situations ...
Sunil K's user avatar
  • 181
-1 votes
2 answers
2k views

Is there an expression or idiom to express that your brain has temporarily stopped working because you've been overwhelmed by something?

I am looking for an informal idiom or expression to imply that my brain has stopped working temporarily because say I have dealt with a heavy math question or I have gone through an overwhelming ...
A-friend's user avatar
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12 votes
3 answers
3k views

Is it okay to say "We are no more in the 20th century"? Using "no more" with periods of time

The most correct form is "We are no longer in the 20th century". But saying "We are no more in the 20th century" or "We are in the 20th century no more" is also correct? ...
Xfce4's user avatar
  • 287
2 votes
1 answer
584 views

Other words in the construction "that's a me (problem/thing)"

Recently I have come across the construction "that's a me problem", which I found kind of interesting. Doing some googling I have found some variations such as "that's a you problem&...
Mohammad's user avatar
  • 1,477
0 votes
1 answer
63 views

Why do some people use 'It's ain't' as in "It's ain't true" with "Is + ain't"?

I found that many people use the form of 'is ain't' on the Internet. I don't know why they use "Is" + "Ain't" whereas it doesn't make any sense? According to Google, there are ...
NIA Team's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
226 views

Is this correct use of "I guess"?

The following is one definition of "I guess" on Urban Dictionary: -apathy towards something or someone Jack: So, are you pro-life or pro-choice? Because I really feel that when you analyze ...
Mohammad's user avatar
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0 votes
3 answers
509 views

What is the opposite of "a soft spot"?

If one can have a soft spot for cherished things, one can have a ________ for dreaded ones. I've thought about words like "imperviousness" or "immunity", but they sound more formal ...
ROX's user avatar
  • 19
0 votes
1 answer
57 views

'X' no longer or no longer 'X'

What is the difference between following sentences: "This outpost is no longer used". "No longer this outpost is used". Do both of the given sentences grammatically carry the same ...
Koko moko's user avatar

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