Questions tagged [intensifiers]

is for questions about modifiers that make adjectives stronger, like very, utterly, quite, absolutely, etc.

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23 views

Is it grammatical to say “It's much more cheaper. . .”?

I was confused when I corrected my student and he asked me if he could use "much more" in a sentence. I'm used to using "much" and "more" separately that's why I didn't know what to say.
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Where to place intensifiers for 'none'

[1] I met none of the Americans in the group who wanted to meet me. If you wanted to emphasize 'none' with 'whatsoever,' 'whatever,' 'at all,' 'in the least,' 'by any means,' or 'in any way,' where ...
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Should there be two commas in the construction so … so … that (intensifier)?

Here's an example: Her deception had been so deep, so disappointing(,) that he swore never to speak to her again. Should there be a second comma there? I'm sure you need a comma if you write ...
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43 views

Are those alternatives exactly equal to what they replace: “very + adjective”?

Thanks to this cool webpage, I got the following rich adjective vocabulary list: Furious —> Very angry Gorgeous —> Very beautiful Massive —> Very big Dull —> Very boring ...
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2answers
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Is the “too” in the idiom “too clever by half” redundant?

I read a sentence in "The Hindu" which was: Instead, the attempt to be clever by half in his affidavit by having the word "regret" in brackets has only landed him in a soup. Acoording to ...
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1answer
443 views

“She very wants to do it” instead of “She wants to do it very much”

Is the sentence "She very wants to do it." could be correct in a meaning of: She wants to do it very much. ? I mean to ask if it is a grammatical sentence at all.
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2answers
50 views

Intensifier or mitigator?

When we use pretty with please as on “pretty please, then “please is used as an intensifier, right? Can’t we use any other intensifier with please?
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As (Much) Instructive As Humorous

I have a question about the following sentence (from page 174 of the book "Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion" by Robert Cialdini): "Although designed for a laugh, the remark is as much ...
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1answer
90 views

What's the meaning of this sentence? “You must have quite a travel agent.”

Two questions here: First question,someone said "first I went to Europe, then I went to France."(we know there's something wrong with the logic of it.) and then someone replied "good, you must have ...
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1answer
73 views

The placement of an intensifier put between the syllables of a three- or more syllable word for emphasis

Playing an online lexicogrammar game, I met the word "unbelievable" written with a swear word "f_cking" inserted between the first and second syllables: "un-f_cking-believable". I understand that ...
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1answer
42 views

The intensifier “fantastically”

I know that we can use the intensifier "fantastically" in constructions such as: The team played fantastically well. The car is fantastically expensive. But can we say He was ...
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2answers
85 views

most interesting or the most interesting

a. Most interesting was what we saw on the fifth day of our stay in Paris. b. What was most interesting was what we saw on the fifth day of our stay in Paris. c. What we saw on the fifth day of our ...
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272 views

Difference:Too Vs Very [closed]

Grammar often says that very is used with the affirmative form of the adjective; since very is to denote positive connotation. But the following sentence seems to me the paradox of the above rule: ...
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444 views

Can strong adjectives have comparative and superlative?

I learnt that strong adjectives are "ungradable" so for example the adjective enormous can't be used with intensifiers such as very, slightly, a little, a bit, extremely, terribly, etc. So I wonder if ...
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Usage of “so” as an intensifier for adjectives

In the following sentences "so" acts as an intensifier for the subsequent adjectives. This car is so expensive. (okay) This so expensive car is John's car. (bad) Can we determine that "so" ...
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Which of either of “too” and “so” to use in “His eyes were … bad that . . . ”?

I got this question from the Cambridge website. His eyes were ...... bad that he couldn't read the number plate of the car in front. such too so very I answered too, but the ...
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3answers
312 views

How to intensify the structure: “someone is jealous of someone else”

How you would intensify the following sentence: He is jealous of me. I'm not sure, but which one of the following sentences works here: He is a serious jealous of me. He is a real ...
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60 views

Regarding so and very

As we use so before adjective like "the movie is so interesting," but can I say negative way like "the movie is not so interesting" means I want to say someone the movie not good?
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I'd like to know the meaning of 'oh~the heartache I found.'

MY favorite song is 'I was looking for someone to love.'sung by Leif Garrett. In the lyrics of the song, I found the phrase like 'I was looking for someone to love and oh the heartaches I found.' I'd ...
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1answer
9k views

It made me really laugh. vs. It really made me laugh

Someone asked me, "What is the difference between these two sentences?" It made me really laugh. It really made me laugh. I'm a native speaker, and I feel like either one is grammatically fine. ...
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1answer
193 views

Is an adjective with an intensifier an adjective phrase?

She is a very beautiful writer. The bold part is a phrase.What kind of phrase it may be- a verb phrase, an infinitive phrase, a prepositional phrase or else?
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274 views

Intensifier do in the past tense [duplicate]

They did create/created the first representative government. Which one is better? Different non-native people think differently.
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Intensifiers: Which one intensifies to the highest degree, and which one to the lowest? [closed]

Here are the examples of adjectival intensification: It's quite cold here in March. It's pretty cold here in March. It's fairly cold here in March. It's rather cold here in March. To ...
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1answer
750 views

Meaning of 'more than average' in the context of pretty/rather/quite/fairly

I have found that adverbs such as 'pretty', 'fairly', 'quite', and 'rather' imply the same meaning as 'more than average' or 'to some extent' when these adverbs are used with gradable adjectives. But ...
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Ask/tell straight up/to his face/off/out something: most usual vs. most intense etc.?

The following are example sentences and comments extracted from the Merriam Learners' entry for the adverb straight : 1 — She walked straight up to him and slapped him in the face. [in a straight ...
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Intensifying “is” using “do”

A strange question: is the form 'do is' correct? For example: HTML is not a programming language. On the other hand, JavaScript, that can be used in a HTML document, do is a programming language.
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The use of “very” and “so” in the “that-clause”

I'm very sorry that I can't join you. I'm so sorry that I can't join you. Which one is grammatical and correct? Thanks in advance.
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1answer
747 views

the usage of 'very' in negative sentence [closed]

Can we use 'very' in 'negative' sentences? I can't go out as it is very cold. Please answer me whether I can write the above sentence or not.
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2answers
5k views

“You ain't no Human.” What is the need of “no” here?

You ain't no Human What is the need of "no" here? isn't it already meaning same without "no"?
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4answers
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How is the expression “very much” used and is “I like very much to play volleyball on weekends” correct?

I know in general terms how to use "very much" but since my students started making specific questions and writing sentences like the one above I got very confused (I'm brazilian, and I just started ...
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1answer
6k views

Is it the formal writing to use double adverbs like “very very” or “really really”?

I am writing a letter, I want to mention a thing by using double adverbs. For instance, it is really really cool, it is very very nice. Something Like that, is it the formal writing or not?
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297 views

“I'll give you more, even.”?

This is about the use of even as an adverb. I only found this. The question is whether you can express surprise by using something like a comma followed by the adverb. Here's a typical interaction, ...
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842 views

so an adjective/ adverb that

... the period was so far like the present period that some of... She was so much beautiful that... She was so beautiful that... As far as I know the bold one is incorrect because we mustn't add ...
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much longer VS. any longer

Neither sides is inclined to protract the dispute much longer; a settlement is expected presently. I am wondering if we could replace much longer in the stand of any more. Extracted from the book ...
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1answer
694 views

“the very image” VS. “the spitting image”

He is the very/ the spitting image of sophistication I am wondering whether or not those mean the same thing, if so, are they interchangeable? Would you please throw a light on this confusion in a ...
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2answers
50 views

an especial usage of the construction“ much of”

...He is much of a gentlemen, and he has traveled enough to throw off that... When or in which situation or condition would you rather use the bold part construction and could you please show me a ...
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explanation of the term “the very”

1.He is the very image of sophistication( he has all the qualities of sophistication)( extracted from the inside reading book 3) 2.This is the very much the story of a story I am wondering if the ...