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Questions tagged [interrogatives]

This tag is for inquiries about the interrogative grammatical form, element, or construction, such as would be employed in the formation of a question.

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Can a question begin with 'but'?

Extract from The Lottery Ticket by Anton Chekhov: "I forgot to look at the newspaper today." said Masha, as she was clearing the table. "Is the list of lottery numbers in it?" &...
James Mathai's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
31 views

meaning of the sentence in bold is uncler to me

As he walked through the dark night he was overwhelmed by an urge to escape from his present mental state. Thoroughly weak, agitated, unstable, anxious; seriously wanting in courage and bereft of any ...
Viser Hashemi's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
1k views

Is it correct to say "What, my family and friends would say, is ...?" instead of "What would my family and friends say is ...?"?

ell.stackexchange.com: (1) What would my family and friends say is the driving force of my life? my variant: (2) What, as my family and friends would say, is the driving force of my life? I think (2) ...
Loviii's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
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"Is monarchy relevant in the modern world or should it be abolished?"— Is it correct not to invert the word order and say "or it should be abolished"?

an example from the section "More examples" on cambridge.org: (1) Is monarchy relevant in the modern world or should it be abolished? Is it necessary to invert the word order in the second ...
Loviii's user avatar
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6 votes
2 answers
1k views

"Do you have planned" vs "Have you planned"

So, what exactly do you have planned for your little jaunt up north? https://www.spanishdict.com/examples/jaunt?lang=en I think the above sentence should be expressed as follows: So, what exactly ...
ForOU's user avatar
  • 1,689
-1 votes
1 answer
63 views

Difference between Aren't and Don't [closed]

Could someone please clarify my doubt on below questions. Aren't you on leave today? Don't you on leave today? Which one should I use to ask question. Thanks
Akilan Chandrasekar's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
99 views

Can 'eliminate' be used as intransitive verb?

I know the verb 'eliminate' is used only as a transitive verb. However, I have read some articles which use the verb as an intransitive verb, without any objects. For example, Your dog should find a ...
Mr. Peti's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
45 views

Help me to understand the construction "Why + noun / adjective / adverb ?" in which there is not a verb

I came across the sentence "Why + noun phrase?". This construction is not quite clear to me because it doesn't have a verb. britannica.com: (1a) Why the hurry? What is the full version of (...
Loviii's user avatar
  • 4,953
10 votes
2 answers
2k views

Which is your favourite X or what is your favourite X?

I just had an interesting conversation with a friend (non-native speaker of English, just like me) who was adamant that "which" can be used as an interrogative pronoun in constructions such ...
Helen's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
152 views

"Didn't she say something?" vs. "Didn't she say anything?"

I think the second statement has negative meanings maybe the speaker thought she didn't even say a single word. Or he/she hesitates between the person speaking or not(speaking), but it's more likely ...
Kaveh Behnia 's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
71 views

Indirect interrogative sentence; is it acceptable "not" to use it in verbal conversations?

It can be just a learner's habit, but I frequently (mis)use direct interrogative forms when I'm actually supposed to use indirect forms. Part of the reason is that it sometimes sounds even more ...
Gwangmu Lee's user avatar
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7 votes
3 answers
2k views

What's the difference between "Was this supposed to be...” and “Wasn't this supposed to be…"?

Was this supposed to be ‘cupboard’ instead of ‘cupbard’? Wasn’t this supposed to be ‘cupboard’ instead of ‘cupbard’? I was asking about a spelling error and I was confused if I should use "was&...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
28 views

"he does fear which humans could be in control."

This is from a news article. A common sci-fi fear that Altman doesn't share: AI models that don't need humans, that make their own decisions and plot world domination. "It waits for someone to ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
22 views

did he (deliberateky) say something

a. Did he say something for John to get angry? b. Did he say something in order for John to get angry? c. Did he say something you to get John angry? d. Did he say something you in order to get John ...
azz's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
194 views

What are the questions starting with "How long" that correspond to "I have three weeks to learn English" & "I have to learn English for three weeks"?

What will be the questions that start with "How long..." for these two following sentences? I have three weeks to learn English. I have to learn English for three weeks. The only question ...
Indu mathi's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
220 views

Questioning in this way: interrogative clause + "or" + affirmative clause + "?"

In my mother language, when we want to ask a question and we doubt between two conditions to be true we ask our question in this way: interrogative clause + "or" + affirmative clause + &...
alireza's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
63 views

wouldn't he like that?

Can I use a. Can I send Tom's article to my wife to read, or wouldn't he like that? instead of b. Can I send Tom's article to my wife to read, or would he not like that? ? I know (b) is correct, ...
azz's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
55 views

When asking for definitions: “What is a cat?” or “What are cats?”

If I want to ask for the definition of a countable noun(e.g. cat). Should I say “What is a cat?" or “What are cats?” Are there any difference between the two expressions?
aLonelySheep's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
26 views

Interrogative form confusion for sentence with is

I have a simple sentence: The dialled number format is 6762 + 2 digits. When I try to convert it into interrogative form, it takes this form: Is the dialled number format 6762 + 2 digits? However, ...
abhijeet pathak's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
24 views

Double "not"s in questions starting with souldn't couldn't isn't etc

I sometimes make interrogative sentences that end up having double "not"s like, Isn't it not that great? (I think it's not that great) Shouldn't it not be there? (I think it shouldn't be ...
xiver77's user avatar
  • 133
-1 votes
1 answer
121 views

Use of question mark at the end of clause

Loving you is like breathing, how can I stop? He asked how I had failed in the examination. In example 1, firstly, there is a comma before the second clause. Secondly, it's in interrogative order. ...
Abid's user avatar
  • 429
-1 votes
1 answer
84 views

Who is you? Who are you?

Do you agree that "Who is you" and "Who are you" mean different things? I hear some say that "Who is you" is wrong. But why is it wrong? Who are you? - "Who" is ...
user1425's user avatar
  • 4,458
0 votes
1 answer
21 views

In how many percents does the yield increase if I water the trees every day?

I want to ask about the increase in the percentage of something, but I am not sure what is the way to ask it in an interrogative way. Can I say: In how many percents does the yield increase if I ...
Virtuous Legend's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
83 views

"will you not open the door" meaning

Will you not open the door? That could be a request for the listener to open the door. But could it also be a request for the listener not to open the door?
azz's user avatar
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9 votes
5 answers
3k views

Who's that book by? vs. Whom's that book by?

Who's that book by? vs. Whom's that book by? Which one is more spoken by native English speakers? Which one is more written by native English writers? In terms of grammar, in the past, only 'whom' ...
gomadeng's user avatar
  • 4,612
0 votes
1 answer
67 views

"Did the glass get broken"

I know if I say "The glass got broken" It is usually a passive construction and it could mean "The glass was broken" / as in an action instead of a state or it could mean "The ...
Bilal Zafar's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
52 views

in which/in how

Spring Flower Gifts trains every manager in its retail stores in _______ they should deal with customer service. a. which b. who c. what d. how The answer is d. I'd like to know why a. can't be ...
listeneva's user avatar
  • 720
0 votes
1 answer
74 views

"what function are they" or "what function they have"?

What is the grammatical structure of the second sentence? What is the indicative form would be? Is it equivalent to "What function or use they have in our lives? But why do we have to have ...
user52346's user avatar
  • 159
0 votes
1 answer
18 views

When will be A... p.p VS When will A be p.p

I'm confused between two interrogative sentences. The first is "When will my score be updated?" The second is "When will be my score be updated? Which sentence is a gramatically correct ...
UNUNUN's user avatar
  • 107
1 vote
2 answers
2k views

What year or Which year?

I am a bit confused between "What year or Which year" Below are some examples, although all seems correct to me. I hope someone can explain what is correct and why? Which year is a leap year?...
Adnan Ali's user avatar
  • 129
0 votes
1 answer
100 views

Where should a preposition be used in an interrogative sentence?

From where are you ? Or where are you from? 2.At what time do you come ? Or What time do you come at ? Aren't the latter sentences in both the examples correct ?
Rayhan's user avatar
  • 351
2 votes
1 answer
827 views

"Does this and this help?" or "Do this and this help?"?

Which one is correct: "Does this and this help?" ("this" and "this" as a whole/as one together) or "Do this and this help?" ("this" and "this&...
The Amateur Coder's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
580 views

What's the difference between "Would you like to go on a long drive with me?" and "Would you like to go with me on a long drive?"

Would you like to go on a long drive with me? Would you like to go with me on a long drive? The position of "with me" is different in both of the above interrogative sentences. As per my ...
Sandeep Kalra's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
433 views

what all did they do

a. What all did they do last night? I think 'what all' is used informally in American English in questions such as (a). I was wondering if it is used at all in British English and would also like to ...
azz's user avatar
  • 2,981
0 votes
2 answers
886 views

'Not' before a noun subject in a question

We know that if we don't use contraction, the structure of a negative question is as follows: Auxiliary verb + subject + not + verb ...? e.g., (1) 'Does he not go to school everyday?' (2) 'Does the ...
Sandip Kumar Mandal's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
38 views

Usage of "How" for referring to amount or quality instead of proposing questions

As I know, I can start an interrogative sentence with "How" for proposing questions like: How fast does this car go? How much does this car cost? Can I start a declarative sentence or a ...
alireza's user avatar
  • 1,070
1 vote
1 answer
53 views

“Any of the rest of…”

Two members of a ten-member group are going to a conference. A person wants to know if anyone else from the group is going. Is the following question naturally phrased? “Are any of the rest of them ...
user142322's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
70 views

Can the same thing be said as both an imperative sentence and an interrogative sentence?

"Guess what it is going to be next." "Guess what is it going to be next?" Do both the sentences express the same thing i.e. asking or instructing the listener to guess?
Curious's user avatar
  • 43
0 votes
1 answer
938 views

Question about using 'how many days' in interrogative sentences

As far as I observed people would use when instead, but still, I wonder if the sentences below are grammatically correct. How many days later will you come (back)? After how many days will you be ...
Xfce4's user avatar
  • 287
1 vote
0 answers
45 views

is + past perticiple? and was + past participle?

When is the last time you danced? When was the last time you danced? Yesterday I saw the first sentence written and I don't know if it's correct. Are both of these options correct? If so what's the ...
LuisC's user avatar
  • 11
1 vote
0 answers
242 views

Why is inversion applied in some subordinate interrogative clauses when a subject is asked for?

Preamble The main concern of this post was discussed in this thread. However, both the OP and I were not convinced of the explanation in the existing answer and comments. I tried to talk to the author ...
Later's user avatar
  • 427
1 vote
0 answers
20 views

"what" or "which" when no prior range is given

Which of the following sentences are natural? If the context didn't name a range of hotels, would it be okay to use "which"? Location is one of the factors I would consider when deciding on ...
Apollyon's user avatar
  • 5,986
1 vote
1 answer
48 views

how better for me to

a. How better for me to learn English than to hang out with you? b. How faster for me to get there than to come along with you? Are both of the above sentences grammatically correct? I think (a) is ...
azz's user avatar
  • 2,981
0 votes
1 answer
25 views

George became a writer of detective stories. (What / Which) did George become a writer of?

In the declarative sentence: George became a writer of detective stories. We changed it to interrogative sentence: (What / Which) did George become a writer of? Should I use What or Which?
Y. zeng's user avatar
  • 1,233
6 votes
4 answers
3k views

Is using "ed" (2nd form of verb) with "did" correct in "Did she have us figured out all along?"

Recently I was watching an anime named Armed Girl's Mischiavellism (DUB). In episode 7 at 2:37 - 2:40 minutes, the guy says: Did she have us figured out all along? Is this sentence correct? If so, ...
Techno Gamer's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
42 views

Is it correct to use both verb-to-be and verb-to-have in an interrogative sentence?

Is the man you met good-looking and have a stable job? Is it vegan and have high protein?
Umm Mubashshir's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
283 views

What will "the weather be" or "be the weather"?

The question about the weather should be 1- What/how will the weather be? While I found a lot of examples with the form of: 2- What/how will be the weather? Doesn't the grammatical form of questions (...
Sameh Fawzy's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
67 views

Why can't we say "if will there be any novels" as a question? [duplicate]

Which is correct and why: I'll be grateful if you give me some details: where can I find the library and if there will be any novels? I'll be grateful if you give me some details: where can I find ...
Sameh Fawzy's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
31 views

know what he did to some

a. Do you know what he said to some people in my neighborhood? b. I want to know what he said to some people in your neighborhood, because they've started hating me. c. Do you know what he did to ...
azz's user avatar
  • 2,981
0 votes
1 answer
44 views

which scientist vs. what scientist

a. What scientist invented the steam engine? b. What man invented the steam engine? c. Which scientist invented the steam engine? d. Which man invented the steam engine? Which are grammatically ...
azz's user avatar
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